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I found THE BEST community college to start an arch career

JawkneeMusic

It's is central Wisconsin.  Programs | Northcentral Technical College (ntc.edu)

 
Jun 2, 21 8:23 am
Non Sequitur

Is your definition of "best" equal to "will accept anyone with a pulse"?


Jun 2, 21 8:31 am  · 
2  · 

None of those programs will allow you to become an architect.  

Jun 2, 21 10:03 am  · 
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OneLostArchitect

a licensed architect... No... but its a good way to wet someones toes in the industry before they go all-in at a university. Plus it will give good building blocks to work off of... especially if credits do transfer over as electives. Or if someone just wants to be a drafter and enter the field... nothing wrong with that. I know a lot of people that went to community college and they are great assets within the firm... they just don't have the aspirations to be an architect. 

For me I learned a lot of community college level stuff at high school. I was thankful I went to a high school with a big focus on trades. l got sucked into the drafting classes with a very talented architect as an instructor. Took 4 years of drafting and I blame him to this day for the reason I got into this forsaken field! :-)

Jun 6, 21 10:15 pm  · 
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The_Crow

You're definitely not going to learn how to design anything here... Maybe produce technical drawings, but there's a lot more to the profession than that. 

Jun 2, 21 10:24 am  · 
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tduds

So I actually have an associate's degree from a community college (CAD + Engineering) and I can tell you firsthand - it's not how you start your architectural "career". However, you'll have a technical leg up on your classmates when you start your architectural education.

Jun 2, 21 3:05 pm  · 
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You won't be getting an accredited degree from a community college though. Nor will you get a degree that allows you alternate paths to licensure in most states.

Jun 2, 21 4:22 pm  · 
1  · 
randomised

but you might develop skills that can be useful when furthering your education

Jun 2, 21 5:50 pm  · 
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tduds

Great point Chad - I should add that I have an associates degree from a community college *and also* a BS in Architecture & Design and also a Masters in Architecture. The AS alone gets me a decent drafting job and little else.

Jun 4, 21 1:35 am  · 
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msparchitect

@Chad you're making the assumption that the student is looking for the fastest, most efficient path. Or that they're suggesting this is the only education to receive. I agree with you if that's the case, but everyone's life is different and some people may need that extra few years of education or time to get it completed in the end. I myself did not attend community college, but I did take 6 years to finish my B.Arch and ultimately it was worth it. I needed that first year taking general courses to focus my path. 

Jun 2, 21 6:04 pm  · 
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Non Sequitur

Don’t give Jawknee the benefit of the doubt here. He’s got quite a long and deranged history and likely 2 or 3 restraining orders.

Jun 2, 21 6:24 pm  · 
1  · 
midlander

i had a b.arch classmate who transferred in from community college, worked himself crazy, and eventually went on to a post-prof masters at harvard. he runs a nice studio with his wife now. CC didn't save him any time since it didn't reduce the core curriculum requirements much - and in fact he still graduated late - but he was figuring out a lot. so for some people it works as part of their path, probably not a useful first step for most though.

Jun 4, 21 7:36 am  · 
3  · 
Arc_verbose

Share with us portfolioo pics or it didn't happen 

Jun 4, 21 12:01 am  · 
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rainonme

I went to a good community college on west coast. Theyre actually better at teaching softwares like Rhino, GH than at Cornell. Also learnt some Revit, Maya, Keyshot. The two professors were actually quite skillful and knowledgable about the contents. They're young and passionate. Cornell professors don't even know how to use most of these softwares. They are pretty pretentious. They talk a few words and just leave the class early and let the TA teach, who is your one year older classmate and barely knows anything more than you do. Also Cornell only does some really really basic GH, vray tutorial in a really messy teaching style. But hey I heard Yale Princeton weren't any better at this either 

Jun 6, 21 4:23 pm  · 
1  · 
tduds

I don't mean this to sound condescending but I know it inevitably will - university-level architecture programs shouldn't give instruction on Rhino for the same reason that university level literature programs don't teach penmanship. You're not learning how to use a tool, you're learning how to think in a certain way. Whatever tool you need to express that thought is up to you, and ultimately your own responsibility to learn. As I said above, CCs & junior colleges are a great place to get a technical leg up because they're technical programs. They're not architectural education, though.

Jun 7, 21 12:44 pm  · 
3  ·  1
Non Sequitur

learning how to use the tool of the day is the easy stuff. You don't need to pay someone 50k/year to know what buttons make the rendering machine hamsters run.

Jun 7, 21 12:54 pm  · 
1  · 

I took a night class while in high school to learn AutoCAD back in the late '90s (PSO). More than half the class where students from the local architectural program.

Jun 7, 21 2:54 pm  · 
2  · 
Non Sequitur

Chad, funny story, I was one of those arch students doing a night college course in CAD in 01/02... and beside the one or other arch student, most of the people there were older folks. Likely trying to pick up new tricks to keep up. I also remember having to hand my assignments on 3.5" floppies.

Jun 7, 21 3:23 pm  · 
1  · 
midlander

my university actually had a very good course on digital modeling... in form-z

Jun 7, 21 7:43 pm  · 
1  · 
midlander

we also had a mandatory cad course. both were widely skipped by busy third year students. and not particularly helpful towards working in an office where understanding workflows and how to organize your work to follow standards was the main challenge.

Jun 7, 21 7:45 pm  · 
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midlander

my least favorite studio instructor was the one who saw it his purpose to make sure we had all the core skills for working in an office, as he observed them to be during his career peak in 1969.

Jun 7, 21 7:48 pm  · 
1  · 
midlander

to a surprising extent, the basic tool skills needed for production work changes rapidly and i don't think it's realistic for universities to keep up. better might be organizing some seminars or forums every semester with production managers from leading offices who could describe the skills they look for in junior staff.

Jun 7, 21 7:49 pm  · 
2  · 
Non Sequitur

I was also thought FormZ in undergrad. I recently had to use it to get a very old office project out of archives. Boy... was that a time capsule.

Jun 7, 21 8:02 pm  · 
2  · 

Ah, FormZ. Memories from school . . .

Jun 8, 21 5:16 pm  · 
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