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Building Enclosures/Building Science Professional Development

atelier nobody

There have been a few threads in the past with questions about sources of education in building enclosures and building science. I have been thinking for a while about a deep dive into this area, and have been doing some research. Attached is a (redacted) memo I prepared for my boss to wrap our heads around the likely cost of such a deep dive - prepare yourself for sticker shock.

 
Apr 22, 21 8:01 pm
Non Sequitur

Fascinating list and I do like your attempt to slide in a new drawing tablet too.  What strikes me here is, how many of these items, like the lesser $ courses on gypsum board, roofing, etc are just glorified specification reading?

We did, a few years back, take a bunch of staff to a building p.eng's office for a thorough session on upcoming energy code changes. Very useful to get an idea of what forces are out there + testing methods... but in the end, our projects that require that level of work will have consultants on payroll who will advise and review the design as it makes it's way through CD.

What I don't see in your list are fire-protection courses.  Not exactly envelope but still a big part of a project with plenty of room for confusion.  

Apr 22, 21 11:20 pm  · 
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atelier nobody

Thanks, NS. I work for a huge company with almost every flavor of engineer and specialist in-house, that tries to avoid using outside consultants, so I'm trying to convince them this is a void they need to fill. On a recent very large government project, the government's reviewers really raked our team over the coals about enclosure detailing (I was not part of the team responsible for enclosure detailing - I should have been), so I'm hoping to convince management they need to make this investment before the next huge government project.

Apr 23, 21 1:22 pm  · 
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No PHIUS certification?

Apr 22, 21 11:28 pm  · 
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atelier nobody

Maybe down the line - not as applicable to the work I do (I'm part of the military-industrial monster).

Apr 23, 21 1:13 pm  · 
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What about the NGA? I've been invited to present and participate in the state glass association for the local chapter's meetings and discussions that I found to be quite good. They were really looking for more input from architects and general contractors and I found their perspective to be interesting on a number of topics. 

There is also the FGIA (combined AAMA and IGMA). I've used so many resources from AAMA regarding testing and performance standards when digging into curtainwall testing and specifications.

Apr 22, 21 11:42 pm  · 
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atelier nobody

Also good ideas for the future.

Apr 23, 21 1:15 pm  · 
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proto

I just did Lstiburek’s Building Science Fundamentals (saw it recommended in another thread this winter). I enjoyed it & def learned some stuff. But it was most definitely a lot to take in if it’s the first time you are seeing some of it. Use the “record” feature on your zoom app so you can go back. He doesn’t read from the slides like a bad lunch/learn.

Apr 23, 21 11:19 am  · 
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atelier nobody

Doing it in May. I'm not quite starting from zero, so hopefully it won't overwhelm me, but I will definitely record.

Apr 23, 21 1:10 pm  · 
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When I took the seminar, it was immediately apparent who hadn't done the reading beforehand. I wasn't starting from zero, but pretty close to it, and I was able to keep up because the reading was the first time I was seeing a lot of it. People who thought they knew better and didn't do the homework were the ones struggling to keep up. But having recordings of it would have been fantastic either way.

Apr 23, 21 1:24 pm  · 
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Wood Guy

That does add up! I just bought ASHRAE Fundamentals, that's all I can swing at the moment. Should keep me busy for a while. 

Apr 23, 21 1:18 pm  · 
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