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Trying to become an architect of some sort

LilMiss30

hey everyone, I found this forum while searching for information on where to even start if architecture is a dream job of mine and I thought maybe y'all could help me out. I have zero college credits and not fresh out of high school. I do not have a clue where to begin when it comes to learning how to draft house designs. I love designing homes inside and out and thats all I really want to do honestly. But I'm scared if I call a comm coll they will push me into classes and degrees I dont need just to squeeze money out of me. Any suggestions for a noob like me would be amazing! 

Note - I know I want to design homes because of my love of the sims literally my entire life and I've only gotten better with time, I play the game just to build homes, I could care less about the actual game play, and I can't imagine what i could do without video game limitations. 

 
Jan 6, 20 12:29 pm
Non Sequitur

eummmm... start by not using fucking dumb short form for real words.  

With that obvious point out of the way, most places do not technically require you to be an architect to design/draft single family housing and plenty of local community colleges offer basic technology and architectural drafting diplomas.  These places don't squeeze money from you, you pay them for the education you need to have a fighting chance in this over saturated profession.

Also, that SIMs mansion is terrible design.  Pick up a pencil and sketch something.  There are zero limitations with pencil & paper.

Jan 6, 20 12:41 pm
Chad Miller

I kind of like the symmetry of the thing.

LilMiss30

wow you dont have to be such an asshole to someone you dont even know. First of all, there is nothing wrong with short hand, this is an internet forum, not a job application you piece of crap. 


Thanks for the insulting results of my post I'll just look elsewhere thanks for nothing 

Jan 6, 20 1:38 pm
Non Sequitur

good luck in the real world.

RickB-Astoria

Jessica Stemmer, You are on this forum using what may be your real name. Consider how you are representing yourself. If you are forward thinking, it might help your case in job hunting in architecture if you proof read what you write and use proper spelling and avoid use of contraction. Contraction should be avoided but if you use a contraction, use proper contraction. Yes, this is an internet forum but first impression can effect your job opportunity. As people have said, what you write on the internet is a simple search on the smart phone away from any job interviewer and they can bring this up in seconds and not employ you because of it. The same is potentially true for any prospective client. All they have to do is look you up and they have all the time in the world to do so. I'm not trying to be mean but I am suggesting to think about how your present yourself on the internet as that will be there for anyone to look up and dig up and use against you for the rest of eternity or until the sun burns the planet up and there is no more internet. It is a good suggestion that you and word of advice from experience, it is best to not respond with negative words, profanity or otherwise to anyone for any reason. It is better to take the high road and not respond to such. Calling someone an asshole is never professional. It shows lack of professionalism. Be like Jesus.... slow to anger. Never speak or write in a derogatory or otherwise negative way. Stand above and apart from vitriol and the gutter that exists on internet forums (ANY OF THEM). It isn't easy but the less of these to find, the better it is for you in job hunting especially when it is common practice for people to look you up on the internet as a part of background checking. Same thing on Facebook. Act responsibly on the internet.

RickB-Astoria

In which case, it is a good example of "less is more". Less negative or otherwise posts or comments that represents you poorly is more opportunities for being hired.

Non Sequitur

Ricky, to be fair, asking someone to "be like jesus" is worse than calling one an asshole. Assholes are real, jesus is not.

RickB-Astoria

That's a debatable argument (which we are not going to engage in) but even being like the character of "Jesus" by following a role model of being slow to anger and resisting the temptations of anger. The point is to try to be better and following the model of not letting the temptations of anger result in her conducting herself in a unprofessional manner which could be looked upon negatively by prospective employers not only in this field but any occupational field. I think you understand the essential point. 

It doesn't matter if Jesus is real or not. It matters that the character and role model presented in the character of "Jesus" be a source of guidance to professionalism and discipline of one's own emotions, temptations, and self-control. Something many of us, including myself, have trouble with due to years of bad habits. My point adds to the "thicker skin" point made and the point of not letting yourself do stupid things. 

You are established, with a significant rapport with your colleagues in the firm where you work and outside the firm. You are licensed to practice architecture where you are at. She is not established. She does not have a rapport. She is new and has absolutely zero practical connections with this field or with anyone. If she tries to get employed, she probably won't get hired and aside from lack of knowledge and skills in architecture, she has very small history with posting on this forum or any forum in architecture or related fields. Therefore, if an architectural firm looked her up for any background, they have just this thread to base on. 

At this stage in her career, she should be conscientious of how she present herself in ANY communication she has in this field that she appears to have indicated a desire. Whether that is totally crushed now, I don't know. I'm just suggesting that she should exercise more care in her responses to posts that gets her angry and also to exercise care in spelling, grammar, and so forth. Others have said that to me on multiple occurrences.

Chad Miller

To the OP,  you need some thicker skin.  NS gave you some good advice.  If you're too hung up on the snarky comments to see that then you should look for a different profession to get into as you'll have to deal with clients that won't like your designs, contractors who won't like you, and various other people who will not use kid gloves to deal with you.


Jan 6, 20 1:57 pm
Non Sequitur

Yeah, like the actual real part of my response is solid, but nope, OP is too hung up on the criticism of their bad sentences and/or SIMs mega mansion design. Whoooooosssss.

RickB-Astoria

I would recommend taking at least some courses in architecture from either a 4 year or 5 year bachelors degree program from a university. You don't necessarily have to go through the whole degree program but the foundational courses in the first 2 to 3 years of the major would be a starting point for getting the concept of spatial design. In a sense, it is like art basic design courses will teach about composition in 2d. You now have to think volumetric composition in 3d space. You can always learn this from various text books used in architectural design courses. There are books on this. Once you have that understood and begin to understand the art of 3d spatial arrangement, you also need to connect the relationship of spatial needs (function) to spatial volume and spatial arrangement. This is both a art and to an extent a science of efficiency of movement between thinks like the sink, the refrigerator, the oven, and prep area if you have an "island" in the kitchen. The relationship of the adjacent spaces like pantry to kitchen and the relationship of eating area to the kitchen. Then you should understand from books and even observation of homes even the modest tract developed houses of the 1950s and 60s about plan typologies of spaces and there is books written about domesticity and spatial relationships of the 'modern home' which still is applicable today. Today's homes may now have computers and be more technological then in the 1950s but the spatial arrangement is still substantively the same plan typologies as they have been for the past 50-100 years. 

I would then suggest after you gain proficiency in the designing and the understanding of spatial relationship in residential homes to then learn CAD or use of BIM tools (Revit, Archicad, etc.) for preparation of the technical documents. Design begins in your head and the first stages of the designing should be paper and pencil or pen or sharpie. Use it to get the design onto paper. Evaluate it and then modify as appropriate. At some point as you get into the learning of CAD/BIM tools, which you can go to a community college to learn, you should learn basics fundamentals of structural engineering and MEP engineering & design. (MEP = Mechanical, Electrical, and Plumbing). You won't be an "engineer" but you should know some of it as you may have to do some of it yourself or at the very least handle coordination of engineering consultants and identify conflicting designs and address it before its out to the permit office. If you have a fundamental understanding of structural engineering, that structural engineer may like you more because you would make their job easier. Just don't represent yourself as an engineer or offer services as engineering services. You can often do a limited level of applying your understanding of engineering in structural and infrastructural design as it is incidental to designing the building. You need to understand the real world assembly of building components. You can't regularly expect dimensional lumber to span beyond 20 to 26 ft. So, don't expect to use 2x12 spanning 40 ft. without supports and some system of lapping. 

It takes quite a bit of knowledge to become a good designer regardless of licensure. There is a LOT to learn. It will take a good decade of intense learning and even experience. As a building designer, for over 10 years, it will take a lot. There is a MUCH higher standard of care when you do this professionally as a service provided to people (clients) for compensation (or no compensation) then it would be for you to design a house for yourself. 

Believe me that you will have some classes in community college that will be helpful that you will actually need to use to some extent that is part of the general education like math, writing, and physics. Even public speaking and small group discussions type speech classes will be of use later on a professional level. It will go a long way later even if you don't see it now. Some classes I suggest over time is some business administration classes which will help you learn how to run a business and finances. There is also plenty of non-college stuff that will help you such as "business of architecture" by Enoch Sears. Even the free resources available can be helpful. Over time, we (this forum) can provide more information and resources for you to read and study and eventually apply as appropriate for your own practice. One thing you will want to learn is how to price your services in a profitable level... like know the difference between direct labor rate and billed labor rate. How do you arrive at your billed hourly rate? What is the typical direct labor rate for a person with similar scope of responsibilities. What is your indirect labor costs? What is your overhead expenses? What is your planned profit percentage if you don't blow your budget in delivering the services? What is billable hours and non-billable hours? How do you make up the cost of non-billable hours in what you charge clients from the billable hours so you go home with a profit at the end of the day instead of running a business into bankruptcy?

There is a lot more. There is so many dimensions of information that you must learn to be successful that it isn't that much of a difference in effort than it takes to be a licensed architect because frankly, you will need to know many of the same things. There is one thing to learn what you need to get licensed. There is a whole world of additional knowledge you need to gain to run and operate a business independently and do the services you offer to clients in a competent & professional manner.

Here is an example of many areas you need to learn about - found in the AIBD's candidate handbook for CPBD certification. ( http://cpbd.info/chb.pdf )  Particularly pages 37 through 43. Note the reference books for the exam. Right now, YOU ARE NOT READY to take that exam but you can look at it to know and learn about the different subject matters as listed. There's nearly 150 subjects areas (knowledge statements) listed in the 4 "knowledge domains" of the exam that you would need to have competency in the knowledge and where appropriate the application of that knowledge when providing such services.

In reality, there are some peripheral areas of knowledge not listed that you may need to know and each of those "knowledge statement" subject areas have a significant body of knowledge as you dig into it. In short, there is a shit load of things you will need to know, understand, and able to perform competently in. If you can look at those as subject areas to study and build your knowledge and library and skill set, that would provide you a foundation to provide competent building / home design services. CAD and BIM and drawing/design skills is not listed but you will need that as those are the skills you need to have to deliver the design services. In addition to knowing how to use paper/pencil, search engines on a computer, office suite software (MS Office, etc.), graphic design software, CAD and/or BIM software, and basic skills of using a computer, email and phones, you will need to build your knowledge and skills in those 147 or so "knowledge statement" subject areas as indicated. You will need to develop soft skills like interpersonal communication skills (customer service.... client relations skills).


Jan 6, 20 2:11 pm
RickB-Astoria

It is not as absolutely critical to get all the knowledge and skills via college but it will be difficult getting employed without a degree. Many of the initial experience is obtained through working for architects and some building design firms. Some of the architectural schools can cover some of that. You have to continue to develop and expand your knowledge and skills.

RickB-Astoria

Additionally, when it comes to stuff like building codes and zoning codes, they are not completely uniformed. You see the reference to the International Residential Code but I say you would need to have knowledge and understanding of all of the ICC published I-codes and the state(s) amended version of those codes in the state or states where you provide services. Each city or county/parish will have their own land-use or zoning code and so forth which you will need to understand and comply with with the designs you provide your client. You need to guide your client through things like that and other stuff like conditions, covenants, and restrictions that may apply to a particular site.

LilMiss30

Rick, I appreciate all the time it must have taken you to write so much to answer my initial question. I thank you kindly. I reopened my account here just to reply to you and thank you.

LilMiss30

At the same time, the one who came at me rudely using F bombs and being completely disrespectful should get the same lecture you gave me about acting right on the internet. I used bad language and I would apologize but at the same time, I will not apologize for standing up for myself in some way and if potential employers dont like that then I dont want to work for them anyways. Thick skin is standing up for yourself but knowing also when to walk away. I wont keep arguing with someone who just wants to be mean for the sake of being mean.

LilMiss30

Everytime I accidentally hit enter it sends and I'm not done, anyways, I'm just trying to draw design draft homes I'm nowhere near an architect degree nor do I know if I even want it. This whole post has sincerely made me reconsider because I dont appreciate the architect world being so hateful and negative and saying well tough up buttercup thats how it is

LilMiss30

I'm tough enough to not have to deal with bullshit from strangers online let alone an employer so if I go nowhere in this field so be it, but I asked a sincere simple question and have now asked the site to remove the post altogether to stop the comments and negative drama a simple question brought on my day today. Having tough skin and not wanting to be dramatic and negative are 2 different things I can be professional and walk away and still have tough skin. I'm sorry for using any foul language but ultimately asshole is just a word just a bunch of letters like it's silly to get mad about it .... but that's just me . Night all sleep tight have fun !!!

Non Sequitur

Lil, I was correct in my original comment.

JonathanLivingston

Responding to forum posts doesn't help you become an Architect though....... 

Jan 6, 20 2:17 pm
RickB-Astoria

True. It doesn't count for AXP training hours, education criteria, or passing the exam.

Non Sequitur

I actually claim some cont-ed hours for my archinect activity. No joke.

RickB-Astoria

Interesting. Can you elaborate on how you are able to claim some continuing education hours for archinect activity. 

In some cases, activities on Archinect can potentially count for continuing education for CPBD continuing education. You would have to provide a printed version of an article like it might be in a blog on this forum not just the URL link. There has to be some quality to the content not just a mere response to a user. 

If the province you are located has something similar, that would be interesting. I don't expect it to be exactly the same.

JonathanLivingston

You're not getting any closer to that license here Rick.

Non Sequitur

Ricky, our cont-ed rules require us to log hours in 2 separate categories: Structured (courses, official lectures, sanctioned lunch and learn, etc) and unstructured. Unstructured can include such things as self-guided study, self-guided tours, and discussion groups. There are maximums in each category so I put in, I believe, the equivalent of 10hr as participation in online discussion. This is over a 2y time span.

Non Sequitur

What you may not be aware of is that I have several conversation with other members, mostly regarding Canadian practice, examination, and universities, outside of the forum. I do not need to provide evidence of this activity.

RickB-Astoria

OAA and AIBD/CPBD CEU has SOME similarities in that regard. Cool. Nice to know N.S. I know there are differences but that's in the details.

Non Sequitur

Thanks for the link Ricky, but I am already well aware of the requirements since I've been licensed for over 7 years.

RickB-Astoria

I know, it's for anyone else that maybe curious.

Without knowing it, you're at a crossroads. You can take the red pill and become an architect, or you can take the blue pill and become an architect of some sort. The choice is yours.

Jan 6, 20 3:08 pm
threeohdoor

Excellent comment, although careful with the use of 'red pill' on the internet. All manner of crazies come out of their mom's basements when those words are uttered.

interpol

did someone say RED PILL?!?

threeohdoor

Are we about to get brigaded by redhats?

atelier nobody

Make Architecture Great Again

Ha ha, I had no idea. Don't mess with my ability to meme in a non-political manner.

Thayer-D

One way to become an architect is to work for a builder.  Listen to what their issues are and begin to solve problems for them.  Practice hand drawing and ask as many people you can about what they like and why.  Get a sense of what works, how it works, and what is beautiful.  You will eventually be designing homes.  As for credentials and schooling, that's the tough part.  Look for the most practical school you can find, as many will teach you a lot of theory that is useless, but to get a license you'll need to go through that gate.  Then again, many municipalities don't require a license so you might be able to get there the old fashion way, that being apprentice to those who know a lot.  Your rendering shows you have good instincts.  Good luck and don't let the strangeness and politics get you down..

Jan 7, 20 10:44 am
RickB-Astoria

Your first sentence is a bit messy and problematic. Working for a contractor does not necessarily count towards the licensure requirements. Maybe a small amount of training hours in AXP... perhaps. It won't get you to licensure. I do agree with the point that the experience would help a person aspiring to become an architect to have a good understanding of how buildings are constructed and built and in turn can help them in becoming a better home designer/building designer or architect. It is valuable skills but doesn't make one an architect per the licensing laws in the U.S.

Thayer-D

You don’t need a license to do houses

RickB-Astoria

Yes. No one is questioning that in connection with the vast majority of states in the U.S. That's not in question. The issue is the architect title. That is regulated and requires licensure and what constitutes "practice of architecture" by the statutory laws of the particular state(s) except where otherwise exempted or exception made in the governing state laws.

Thayer-D

Who cares about the title if you love your
work and you’re good at it.

RickB-Astoria

Yeah. However, if you want to avoid those fines and all..... you know....

tduds

"Working for a contractor does not necessarily count towards the licensure requirements." ...nobody said it did

Thayer-D

Yeah, just tell your family. To the building department, you’re a designer ;)

Almosthip7

"I want to be an architect but don't actually want to do any of the work to achieve this goal"

That's what I read every time I see one of these post.

Go to school......learn, just like the rest of us.

Life is not a video game.


Jan 7, 20 6:27 pm
Non Sequitur

Careful, you’ve probably insulted the Op. they will complain and get mommy to write an angry letter to the big green head.

leonizer

lmao the Sims... and another mediocre mansion as well..

Jan 8, 20 11:15 am
Dokuser

architecture...dream job


interesting.

Jan 10, 20 12:22 am
joseffischer

Front stairs to a 2nd floor entry
no walls under those double gable things on the 3rd? floor
McMansion Roof with no crickets and way too many ridges

OP, check out McMansion Hell on google.

Jan 10, 20 9:47 am
RickB-Astoria

I agree. There should have been one single gable or hip roof along the long axis of the mansion and be the dominant ridge line and gable dormers where the dormer ridges would be a little lower than the main ridge line. Other problems as joseffischer mentioned. Roof form serves to direct and shed rain water so you have to think of how the rain water will be directed to eaves. In general with residential structures, the roof overhangs the roof line be 1' to 2' and would have a gutter system and drain spout. Yes, you can terminate the roof at the wall line where you have a parapet. To the OP, these are terminologies you will want to learn and understand if you want any hope of becoming an architect or home designer. While there is no law defined minimum knowledge and skills you need to have to be a home designer, there is still some professional de facto standards for the knowledge and skills that you need to have to practice independently in a competent and effective manner. As a rule of thumb as a building designer, simpler roof forms are usually better. Wherever possible, I like to minimize valleys and care in how the roof and dormers join and the flashing detail is paramount to assure roof leaks are not happening. Where I am, we have one of the wettest environments in the country. Therefore, it really makes sense to address moisture penetration. This is something you have to think about at the design stage not at the construction phase.

william_12

i am interested in this architecture job ...dream job

Jan 11, 20 4:21 am
william_12

i am interested in this architecture job ...dream job

MyBKExperience Free Whooper

Jan 13, 20 12:39 am
tduds

FREE WHOOPER YOU GUYS

Jan 13, 20 1:15 pm
code

Trying to become an architect of some sort, is the road to ruin in this profession - in order to be an architect, you must have a clear direction of where you want to be in 1 year, 3 years, 5 years, 10 years and 20 years - without a clear direction, you will end up as a cad/BIM monkey going from job to job and never getting anywhere. look at those who made the grade and follow their examples - it;s a lot of work - there is no easy way

Jan 13, 20 1:25 pm

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