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Need a refresher course on architectural engineering / calculating loads, etc.

Pandekage

So getting back into a master's and into my first structural course in three years... and because it's in a foreign language it's doubly hard. Could anyone recommend a good refresher course or educational document, i.e. lecture PDF from a university or website, that covers the basics and intermediates of calculating loads on beams and members, moment and shear, all that jazz? ( < at this point I'm just spouting key words I recall from three years ago...nervous laughter)

 
May 15, 18 2:56 am
senjohnblutarsky

You could just find a school local to you and see what they have.  I know Virginia Tech's Alexandria (Washington DC area) campus offers structural courses aimed at people preparing for the licensure exam.  I used to get emails about those all the time.

You said foreign language, but didn't give us any detail about location. 

May 15, 18 8:05 am
Pandekage

I'm in Germany. I'm already taking a structures class at the uni here for my Masters, as a continuation on themes taught at the Bachelors level, but since it's been years since getting my Bachelors (and since it's taught in German) it's doubly hard to recall all I'm supposed to know. I was wondering if there were any good online resources, perhaps from companies or universities, that covers the general structures course content for a Bachelors student in Arch.

May 15, 18 8:35 am
thisisnotmyname

A good book in English is Simplified Engineering for Architects and Builders by James Ambrose.

Good luck to you.  After 20 years of practice in the USA, I can tell you that calculations-heavy structures classes were the most useless part of my education.  I spent two semesters calculating isolated beams, columns, and trusses.  A good structures course should be about understanding and configuring structural systems, not a math class.  

May 17, 18 10:27 am
Schoon

^I agree with this. Beyond simple checks, leave the hardcore engineering to your engineer. However, knowing how load paths work, the limits of different materials, and the behavior of systems in general saves you (and your engineer) a ton of headaches down the road.

tintt

I like this channel. 

May 17, 18 2:52 pm

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