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2018+ Resolution

RickB-Astoria

Ok, it is a little early but we're now in December so it is around that time of the year to think about it. Here below is a couple of items on my 2018(+) resolution. These two below are highlighting a couple key new year resolution for career accomplishments not mundane but nonetheless meaningful accomplishments like just having a job and money in your pocket to pay the bills which would be a much longer list. 

1. Complete my Associates degree in Historic Preservation at the community college and get it completed in full. This is in motion already and in play so it should be estimated to be completed before July 2018 comes around.

2. Begin the NCBDC certification for Certified Professional Building Designer status credential. It should be an accomplishment on my part of completing something with regards to my building design occupation. For much the same reason anyone pursuing licensure as Architect. To attain that credential. In every respect, hard work. In every respect, an achievement. Perhaps, after completing the NCBDC certification, I may work towards other challenges along the way... When do I plan to complete this, I plan to complete the NCBDC certification process by 2020. There are processes in the certification that I do not have complete control over but I hope to complete the CPBD status by early or sometime during the year 2019. This is why I titled the topic 2018(+) because part of this will likely lap into 2019 but beginning the NCBDC Certification Candidate status is planned to be happening between now and early 2018. 

I wish anyone else working on what they feel as meaningful career accomplishments over next year, the best. Best wishes on that.

 
Dec 3, 17 9:52 pm
RickB-Astoria

I'll add, anyone wishes to post their 2018 resolution, feel free to add. 

Dec 3, 17 10:51 pm
RickB-Astoria

After I get the NCBDC certification completed, I'm planning on getting the electronic seal and the embosser and also the rubber stamp at some point. With the embosser, I can essentially do what is called "registered embossing" by embossing over the printed or wet stamped seal. The embossing of the seal adds a little extra level of authenticity. Sure it requires a little muscle to use the embosser.

5839

The minimum experience to qualify to take that exam is 1040 hours per year (i.e. a steady half-time work schedule), for 3 to 6 years, depending on education. Most would get the idea from your posts that your building design business has not provided nearly that much work on a regular basis. How are you going to document 1040 hours per year?

As for the embosser and seal: that seems to be a money-making gimmick for AIBD, with no real-world value. For $200+ they're selling a rubber stamp and embosser that would cost a total of $34 at any seal company.

RickB-Astoria

I been in business for over 10 years and have means to document experience back 10 years.

RickB-Astoria

Applicants shall verify their professional experience by submitting three or more forms of verification using the following list of acceptable methods: 

 Letter of employment verifying the Applicant’s dates of employment. 

 A statement by an individual personally known by the Applicant verifying the Applicant’s number of years of experience. The statement shall be submitted on a Letter of Verification Form created and approved by the Board of Examiners. 

 Annual W-2 provided, if employed, or the first page of a 1040 form if self-employed. 

 A valid business license issued by a local municipality (verifying self-employment). 

 Articles of incorporation (verifying self-employment). 

 Additional forms of verification may be approved by the Board of Examiners on a case by case basis.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I have business registry with the State of Oregon since 2012. I'd fall under self-employed. I have ability to verify being in business as far back as 2006 with the building official at the time. In short, I been in business since 2006. So if I were open for even 1 hour a day, I would meet the 3,120 hours of experience. I'd think we can agree that I spent more time devoted to building design than that.


RickB-Astoria

I also have had numerous clients and respective clients that I have to account for as well. Let's not overthink this. I'd have to submit a working set of drawings that would meet the IRC code. I've had a number of small projects not worth really talking about that much. Not all that terribly exciting project as well as some modest but meaningful projects. 

5839

It sounds like you're assuming that this works like it does for IDP/AXP - i.e. that it's a total number of hours that you have to account for, over any period of time. But that's not how AIBD's requirement works. Theirs is a minimum requirement of 1040 hours per year, for each of the years that you use to document the 3-6 required years. In other words, you could use any of the years since you've been doing this, to satisfy the reuqirements - but each of those years that you document has to have a total of 1040 hours of building design work within that year. Your "small number of small projects not worth really talking about that much" has to add up to 1040 hours in each of the years that you count.

RickB-Astoria

Don't overthink it. It'll work out. 

 If you're in business for yourself, you're going to be investing at least 4 hours a day x 5 days a week in the building design profession. This includes a variety of activities associated with building design profession and not just drafting or client-specific work. There is work involved in building design that includes business administration, talking with prospective clients under initial consultation, marketing the business, and so forth. 



5839

The application states that if you're self-employed you must submit 3 letters of verification of the length of your experience, from building officials, licensed architects or engineers, or certified NCBDCs. So you're not going to be able to just use the existence of a building license. I'm not saying you don't have the experience - I'm just asking the question, because the candidate handbook specifies "minimum 20 hours per week", measured quarterly, and "minimum 1040 hours" in each year. From what I've seen here I'm skeptical that there are 3 licensed/certified people or building officials who are familiar enough with your work to substantiate this - particularly as you never want to mention any actual projects.

RickB-Astoria

The form itself predates some of the adjustments in the policy. "Applicants shall verify their professional experience by submitting three or more forms of verification using the following list of acceptable methods:"

RickB-Astoria

 Letter of employment verifying the Applicant’s dates of employment. 

 A statement by an individual personally known by the Applicant verifying the Applicant’s number of years of experience. The statement shall be submitted on a Letter of Verification Form created and approved by the Board of Examiners. 

 Annual W-2 provided, if employed, or the first page of a 1040 form if self-employed. 

 A valid business license issued by a local municipality (verifying self-employment). 

 Articles of incorporation (verifying self-employment). 

 Additional forms of verification may be approved by the Board of Examiners on a case by case basis.

RickB-Astoria

Pgs. 26-29 is are most accurate. The up to date Candidate Handbook can be found here: http://www.cpbd.info/chb.pdf --------. How many hours a week do you think I am open for business for clients to contact me for projects. There's drafting work/CAD Technician work, there work in various levels for clients I've worked projects for. Some of which wasn't worth much to bill. There is also consultation time spent. There is also work I've done with regards to historic preservation consultation which would count in the realm of building design as it pertains to existing condition assessments, historic building documentation work and research that would apply to building design work. Even the work you do in preparation of even the project program.... pre-schematic design phase work is still relevant experience that defines project scope, project specifications, and so forth. It effects, interior design work. There is also landscape design. There is also answering questions from prospective clients. It might not have paid much, but they count. Considering a significant period of my business had been basically surviving the recession with market price ceiling dropping to pretty darn low levels, it wasn't always something I can get a client willing to pay the bills. Sometimes, I might have to spend a little bit of my time doing a little "25-cent architecture" gigs.... (the 25 cent architecture is a reference to a gentleman in Washington state who had a lemonade like booth/stand where people drop a quarter, ask him a question relating to architecture, and he gave his answer to the question). It all counts even when it doesn't pay that much. While, I might not do the "booth" thing. I may still devote time to the profession... professing the knowledge and skills through consultation with clients, prospective clients, and through answering various questions over the phone, over email, in person, and even on social media.

RickB-Astoria

The experience is about devotion in the profession of building design. It is not just about sitting in front of a drafting table and drawing buildings. The root word of profession is "profess". It's more than say... advocating. It's advocated with substance of knowledge. It isn't just supporting a cause. It isn't just supporting historic preservation or sustainable design. It is professing why historic preservation is important and why we need to be sustainable in practices. There is a lot to the profession that isn't necessarily money earning. Those activities is our opportunity to represent ourselves & business but more important to share your knowledge.... to profess that knowledge and also to learn from others.

It isn't always in the "educational experience" where we learn it through formal educational institution but now in the practice of our profession. There is certainly a wide range of activities I spent in devotion to the profession of building beyond the amount of time in from of the drafting table.

RickB-Astoria

In any case, there is a variety of aspects to the building design profession as a whole where it isn't just 'billed' work in connection with client work. Therefore, as a business, it is hard to enumerate all the hours devoted to building design profession.

RickB-Astoria

Consider this from the code of ethics: 

http://www.cpbd.info/code.pdf

Be encouraged to become involved in community and civic activities that are beneficial to their community, state or nation.

Keep informed of all pertinent laws, ordinances and building codes. 

Continuously strive to demonstrate and improve both their knowledge and
competence. 

Attempt to promote public awareness, as it relates to evaluating professional
competence in the building industry. 

------------------------------------------------------------------------

Would these activities as it pertains to or relates to building design fit into time spent towards and dedicated to the profession of building design and something principals of a building design practice would be doing?

Not all activities falls into the "education credit" portion due to the simple fact that some of that time isn't for any form of 'credit' or continuing education CEU hours. For example, self-directed research to further advance ones knowledge of a topic might fall into general experience.


RickB-Astoria

All these factors starts adding up.

5839

The form doesn't predate the current rules. The current form, which is in the handbook to which you linked, was developed in conjunction with the current rules. I have confirmed with AIBD that a self-employed person is currently required to submit a minimum of 3 letters of recommendation. Acceptable recommenders are building officials, licensed architects and engineers, currently certified NCBDCs, and contractors. "Others" may also submit letters, though they would need to explain in what capacity they are affiliated with the profession that would make them credible references. All references are contacted after letters are submitted to confirm authenticity.

RickB-Astoria

I do have previous editions of the Candidate Handbook and the form itself is substantively unmodified since 2012. The forms was originally set up Three letters of recommendations, business licenses, and other supporting documentation is fine.

Three letters of verification isn't necessarily going to completely verify all my experience. I'll be submitting copies of state registration from the state database as well as additional records and other documentations. Even with three letters of verifications, it isn't going to be an hour by hour blow so relax. 

RickB-Astoria

Others can also be clients, city officials, or any other suitable party that has any relationship or connection to the applicant that would be pertained to them.

RickB-Astoria

Additionally, they want building design experience of 6 years at 20 hours a week or equivalent where no more than 3 years of the experience maybe for education with at least 3 years of experience @ 20 hours a week or equivalent experience. They don't want people submitting just 3 years of experience with only say.... 5-10 hours per week. However, if someone is submitting more than the 3 years with the education credit of 3 years. Say, 3 years of education fully meeting the 3 years credit and say.... 6 years of experience then it is generally acceptable to submit with less than the 20 hours a week as long as the average hours is equivalent. If you go back to the 2012 candidate handbook: 

"Any individual who, regardless of the registration or licensing requirement of their state or country of residence, is eligible to sit for the certification exam provided he/she has been engaged in the professional practice of building design for at least six (6) years, for no less than twenty (20) hours per week, average. Not more than three (3) of the required six (6) years shall be considered educational and may consist of training or courses relating to architecture or structural engineering in accredited universities, colleges, vocational or correspondence schools, or employment and on-the-job training, under the supervision of a Professional Building Designer, architect or professional engineer." 

 They include the word, average. This policy is still in play internally at AIBD/NCBDC. If someone submitted educational credit for 3 years credit and 6 years of experience @ 10 to 15 hours a week, those 6 years would be equivalent or more than equivalent to the minimum 3 years @ 20 hours a week. I'd be submitting experience records for the whole time period in business to support documentation of experience even before I had filed business name on the state business registry. I will probably be submitting more than the usual minimum from multiple sources and documentation.


RickB-Astoria

If you show less than 20 hours a week, you'll need to show more years of experience for the same equivalency. They'll probably not except less maybe 10 hours a week but then 6 years or more would need to be documented for the equivalent of 3 years @ 20 hrs. a week (1040 hours) My experience will fluctuate from above 20 hours a week and sometimes less than that.

RickB-Astoria

I contacted AIBD staff. Lets put it like this, they ultimately are looking for equivalent. It isn't like self-employed business owners are filling out time sheets on a weekly basis. They aren't totally anal retentive. They are looking for a reasonable equivalent as a minimum. 

For example, if you worked on AXP (for example and not licensed yet) and earned your 5600 training hours and you worked less than 20 hours a week, NCBDC would accept it. If you can provide some documentation from your NCARB record to support it, NCBDC isn't going to get bent out of shape. While letters of verification would be needed which is fine. I think we're good.


5839

They removed the 2012 language deliberately because there was a decision not to allow averaging. That's why they require 20 hours minimum per week, substantiated by quarter. You can no longer count a year that doesn't include 4 quarters of that documented minimum. If you had tax records to substantiate a reasonable income from your business you'd probably be ok. But you've stated in past threads that in most past years your income was so low that your student loans didn't even require partial payments - i.e. rock bottom poverty. Also clients aren't valid references for purposes of documenting self-employed hours. If you submit those then your application comes back incomplete, requiring more documentation - typically the supplemental documents they ask for are tax/income verification, and additional project drawing sets.

RickB-Astoria

Income and hours spent running a business are two different things. I may still spend time running the business, 3-4 or more hours a day for 5 to 6 days a week. Business owners are not necessarily employees nor would they be paid a wage or a salary. Business owners aren't submitting W-2 forms, unless you are running a corporation and serve as an employee of a corporation. Additionally, how are any of the references from any of those letters of verification going to assess the exact number of hours. They are verifying years of experience not hours you spend running a business. 

I'm not sure where your source is exactly on the averaging. Are you on the NCBDC council? 

There is only a need to verify their professionals experiences by submitting three or more forms of verification from the list. For example: valid business license issued by local municipality, articles of incorporation (or even articles of organization for LLCs), and state business registrations, then there is the option for statement by an individual personally known by the Applicant verifying the Applicant's number of years of experience in which the statements being submitted on a Letter of Verification forms such as the one in the Candidate Handbook. Generally, with regards to self-employed business owners, we aren't paid wages/salaries. We are paid whatever we get from paying clients from account receivables minus expenses. 

How many hours we spend to administer a business, profess the profession, and so forth is asynchronous to whatever we get paid. There is paid and unpaid labor. With a sole-proprietorship, what I take to use for myself is called a draw. 

My income can suck ass and I still be spending 15-30 hours a week keeping the doors open for business and also doing various building design profession related activities that isn't always billed or under compensation. If you haven't noticed, I still have open hours listed, 9A to 6PM Monday through Friday and Saturday from 10AM to 4PM. Sundays maybe listed as closed but I may still do some work on Sundays.

5839

The three items from the list are a different issue from the three references for self-employed people. You're conflating two different requirements. Every applicant must provide three items from the list, regardless of your employment status, AND self-employed applicants must additionally provide three letters from industry professionals. The changes to the rules were exactly to prevent the situation you're describing: somebody "hanging out a shingle" for 3 or 10 years or whatever, calling themselves a designer, but rarely if ever designing anything. AIBD doesn't want to certify that type of part-timer or hobbyist.

RickB-Astoria

It doesn't matter because regardless of income, I still spent time devoted to the profession. Usually, I don't bill for many of the small jobs like deck designs because the total project cost for some of that kind of work is too small to bill under the competitive environment where contractors won't even bill for the design. When projects are that small, they take time but they aren't really billable in the market place. During the recession, the price ceiling hit the floor. Trying to bill for even designing a house was nearly impossible. If you tried to charge more than $500, clients walk. If you are trying to get paid enough to pay for business license renewals, you charge whatever the client is willing to pay. That's not easy when 95% of the market literally raced straight to the bottom. You have to bottom feed to keep busy. Now, sure, I could have charged more but I would then only see a project maybe once in 5 years or so and even then, it might be a 10% chance they'll signed if you charged anywhere close to what architects charge. Those willing to pay those fees, already get picked up by architects. The rest don't want to pay and wants to get everything next to nothing. When contractors and others in the market are racing to the bottom charging anywhere from free to maybe 10 cents per sq.ft. or essentially whatever it costs them to have the plans printed at a printing shop. How do you expect me to charge a meaningful fee when literally everyone in your market area wasn't charging anything for their services? It was really a hell market in that time frame. Sure, I got those damn 'shoppers' who are trying to get everything without paying for the services.

RickB-Astoria

There are those small projects and consultation services where they never paid but it is still time. Do you think I am going to try to sue them or waste money collecting on some project the client was only willing to pay maybe $100-$150 but end up not paying?

There were also consultant services rendered for $0 to maybe once in awhile, $20-$30. If they want drawings, I'd do up a design for them. As for certification, what would an architect or engineer be able to certify other than years? They can't verify what hours a candidate running their own business can certify? How would any CPBD will? They don't verify the hours per week. That information comes from the candidate.

RickB-Astoria

I'll ask you again, how are you part of the AIBD and NCBDC? If you didn't notice, I was part of the subject matter experts work. I have had all kinds of small projects that never paid or never amounted to a meaningful income. 

Like probably 90% of any candidate that would be a business owner, we don't keep time sheets. Many design projects for small work during the recession weren't earning money because the client wouldn't pay and the market price ceiling dropped to terrible lows. I'm not going off income because I spent far more hours working unpaid than I was getting paid during a lot of that time because the market was just absolutely horrible and those who would pay the fees I would have wanted to be paid were already going to architects and engineers or they hire a design-build contractor who were heavily subsidizing the cost of design services. Therefore, it was horrific financially. Do you think I'm going to promote the myriad of crap work that I was picking up to keep busy.

RickB-Astoria

I'll submit to them THREE working sets of drawings for three different building designs that will be designed according to the IRC and IBC (perhaps current edition) for extra measure.

5839

Subject matter experts can't test within three years of that activity anyway, so this is all moot. You signed that agreement when you agreed to participate (virtually, by mouse click, after the "I agree..." screen). That's probably good: make sure to line up some mentors over these next few years, so that there'll be people to write your reference letters.

RickB-Astoria

two years. The last part I was involved with was the Content Review. I was not involved in the last part, the writing of the questions. I wasn't part of the question writers.

5839

It's two years from the end of the study cycle - not from your particular participation. That's effectively 3 years or more. The cycle isn't expected to be over until February 2018 or later.

RickB-Astoria

"Help review CPBD test questions. The National Council of Building Designer Certification is still in need of five to seven content experts to sit for four separate three hour web conferences to review current Certified Professional Building Designer (CPBD) exam items (i.e. categories, questions, examples, etc.). The intent is to reclassify the items based on their content and the newly established exam specifications. You do NOT have to be certified to serve on this important task force. However, ANSI standards and NCBDC policy restricts non-certified exam review participants from applying for certification for a period of 24 months. A doodle poll will be emailed to all participants and review sessions will be scheduled based on Expert availability to get as much input as possible. Your participation is needed to continue the CPBD certification’s growth and the continued benefit of the certification to the profession of Building Designers. If you are potentially available for these content review meetings please email Steve.Mickley@aibd.org. Attendance to each meeting is not required but your participation would greatly assist the field." "However, ANSI standards and NCBDC policy restricts non-certified exam review participants from applying for certification for a period of 24 months."

http://www.aibd.org/mondayminute/?cat=697


RickB-Astoria

What is your part or role at AIBD / NCBDC? 

If I have to wait a little longer, so be it but it is my understanding that the 2 year wait cycle was from the end of my involvement. I'm willing to wait the actual cycle needed because of the time frame required but the two year wait period wasn't in any way or form indicated to be after the Study Cycle.

RickB-Astoria

5839, I'm willing to wait whatever needs to be but if you are part of NCBDC or AIBD but then I would like to go over this with you and all that. I want to clarify some details regarding the exam eligibility stuff and all. A year or two doesn't hurt especially if it gives time to iron out the new exam, ANSI accreditation, and everything else. In which case, it would probably be appropriate to discuss this further in private email.

5839

ANSI requirements say that testing exclusions date from the end of an evaluation cycle. Basically if you were involved with developing and/or reviewing any content then you're part of that cycle's exclusions. AIBD has not done this before in compliance with ANSI, so their language isn't the best. If they let people who were involved in exam development start testing before 2 years from the end of the cycle they'll risk losing ANSI cooperation.

I'm involved in standards development.  I can't say in what capacity.

Sorry but I don't get email from this site.

RickB-Astoria

send email to me at rick(AT)rickbalkinsbuildingdesigner.com - then my waiting an additional two years (for ANSI accreditation purpose) is less about the nuance of hours a week and more about my part in trying to assist in the ANSI accreditation part. I don't want to muck that up, either. It would be for the best for the whole process. If you have any part with the ANSI accreditation in connection with AIBD/NCBDC, this would be perhaps something that needs to be addressed and then given a notice by AIBD via their AIBD Monday Minutes to notify that those of us will be able to begin 2 years after completion of the Study cycle per ANSI standard or whatever. I'm not sure exactly the appropriate channels since I wouldn't want to be any part of any reason for the ANSI accreditation process being muddied or jeopardized. If waiting two more years from the end of the Study cycle, I can live with that.

RickB-Astoria

There are different phases of the exam process. The standard setting phase was completed December 11, 2017. However, I was not part of that itself. It is expected to standard setting study itself in January/February 2018 to establish the cut score for the test. The accreditation process, as I recall it would be the ANSI/ISO/IEC 17024.

Anyway, I am just checking all the facts as I can and whether my part would be offset by the study for cut score or if the particular parts I was involved in was under part of a prior 'study'. 

RickB-Astoria

5839, can you scan from a copy of the ANSI standard documentation that specifies the 2 year after the study cycle or appropriate rule and sent to the email as listed. It is my understanding that the 2 year wait as I referenced above earlier from the above part is set up based on the guidance from PSI Services, LLC. who are involved in the Accreditation Consulting, starting with the Job Analysis all the way down to the Standard Setting. PSI Services LLC are the psychometric service provider overseeing these processes. The 2 year rule after the Study Cycle would be for those involved throughout the entire process including the item writers steps and everything else being called upon. At this time, it is my understanding that because I was not involved in the later activities after June 21, 2016 that the 2 year rule would apply from that date. If I were involved in the item writing and other later phases, I would most certainly be having to wait until 2020. I would imagine any non-certified persons involved in later phases would have a later date in the 2 year exclusion period. PSI and the ANSI should be on the same page.

RickB-Astoria

Testing policy is established under PSI Services LLC consultation. I contacted NCBDC president and feedback from AIBD president. Feedback by AIBD President: "The policy relates to the individual, not the process: ”... for a period of 24 months following THEIR last exam development activity." (emphasis added by me)". 

It is more legally sound to base it on the individual and calculated based on the last exam development activity than to have an "indeterminate" situation where each phase of the exam development process being of unknown duration. It isn't like they have an exact idea how long the process will take. PSI is involved with the test development and psychometric and are experts in ANSI/ISO accreditation for certifications.


I got a punching bag, gonna work on some upper body. Moving in general is supposedly good for people.

Sadly, we have no good place to hang it, so it may have to live outside on a hanger. I will get it a nice jacket.

Dec 4, 17 12:05 pm
randomised

Punching is always a good resolution, enjoy!

Sadly the bag just lies there and puts up no fight what-so-ever. It's like Don Rickles' wife, RIP.

arch76

Good Luck to you both, and thanks RickB for putting this introspective vibe in the air.

Dec 4, 17 10:47 pm
RickB-Astoria

Thanks. In whatever meaningful career goals for 2018, I hope you best in accomplishing those goals.

arch76

I was sincere in thanking you for starting this thread. Happy holidays. I kinda wanna pursue an S.E., but I also have too many home projects lingering...and rally school. never enough time...\

RickB-Astoria

Alright. In any case, I hope you best in working through each step towards the goal. It might not reach the end goal but each milestone towards it is still a meaningful goal to accomplish so therefore best wishes.

RickB-Astoria

PS: Happy holidays to you and your family as well arch76.

Tinbeary There there

Good luck, Rick. Knock it out of the park.

Dec 5, 17 9:15 am
RickB-Astoria

Right now, the game plan is, the first half of the year, finish goal #1 and then the latter half of the year begin goal #2 and hopefully complete them during 2019 and if lucky, be completed by December 2018.

Tinbeary There there

My goal is to do more and more of the fun stuff and less and less of the annoying stuff.

Dec 5, 17 9:21 am

Best to start that while you're still young. The other option is to start enjoying the annoying things.

Tinbeary There there

I started out doing the fun stuff, then did some annoying stuff that was "required". I'm still young by the way. At least I think I am. Relatively speaking. I get carded often.

jamesaleisterbarcelona

My goal is to be able to make up my mind whether I should pursue Urban & Environmental Engineering or Parametric/Computational Design for a Masters degree. The former will require me to learn a new language, while the latter will require me to buy a new computer and learn/re-learn a few new softwares.

On a lighter note, I hope everyone had at least a moderately good 2017!

Dec 5, 17 9:34 am

2017 was awesome except for our government.

Dec 5, 17 10:54 am
MDH-ARCH

My goal is to make as much money with my side hustle business as my full time job so I can get ready to be fully self employed. 

Dec 6, 17 8:42 am
tduds

I have one goal: Finally gettin' that license. 

Dec 6, 17 11:51 am
RickB-Astoria

Wish you best. Looking forward to T. Duds, Architect :)

thatsthat

Right there with ya, Tduds. Good luck!!

kjdt

I'm curious as to how an associate degree in historic preservation will be useful to you.  You've said you're "not an employee type person", so I'm assuming you wouldn't try to go after an internship with the national parks or something, as those are generally very rigidly hierarchical and structured.  Most any RFPs/RFQs I see for historic preservation contract work require a masters and a portfolio of past work, whether for federal contracts, state or local level, or private clients.  What are you planning to do with that degree?

Also I note that these are the same as your 2011 goals, and pretty similar to most years in between.  I would encourage you to add a resolution about perseverance.  Usually when people post their goals publicly it's because they want support and encouragement, and/or they want the added incentive to achieve the goals so they won't lose face. You tend to make the same goals over and over, and then come back with a zillion excuses every year, and no progress at all.  Make a goal to not be a perfectionist, but to not give up either.  Make a goal to be able to report back here in 6 months or a year and have made some progress of some sort.

Dec 6, 17 6:52 pm
RickB-Astoria

kjdt,

Thanks for the critique. There are a lot of historic preservation work that has published RFPs/RFQs. Historic preservation work in connection with residential work will often not have any specified formal education. The point of completing this associates degree completing a degree that hasn't been completed yet and was on halt since 2011, in part of going to U.of Oregon in 2011. Additionally, having a masters degree is not an absolute requirement even for the National Parks Service. It's more a guideline but they also recognize there are qualified people who do not have a master's degree especially when there are numerous NCPE accredited programs of high quality that exists at multiple levels of degrees. I also have education at the U of Oregon on historic preservation. U of O's program is more research oriented and CCC's program is more hands-on on the crafts trades. It's nice to have good research but if you want to have stuff preserved or restored, you have to have people with the crafts skills. I was taking a point of learning from both research and trades. Without that, how well would I be able to tell good work from crap. 

Sometimes arbitrary degree requirements are not suitable. The local CLGs, my state's SHPO (and Washington), and even the NPS recognizes that. I do know people in the state SHPO offices. The mission of historic preservation can't let itself be hamstrung by what letters are printed on the diploma. When working with private clients like a lot of home owners (which makes up one of the largest portion of historic resources) that needs to be documented, preserved, in some cases, be restored, rehabilitated, and so forth. At the end of the day, what matters is not diploma sheets but experience. The degree completion and receiving that degree's 'diploma certificate' is just a beginning part of a career involving doing work with regards to historic buildings and a whole new wave of historic resources regarding those mid-century (20th century) architecture.

I agree with you on the perseverance part. I'll be reporting in late June 2018 when I get goal #1 completed. Remind me (anyone willing) around that time as it is very MUCH possible that this thread gets buried by then. About July, I'll be beginning Goal #2. I'll report on the passing (or fails.... I hope not) of each of the exam parts. When completed and obtain certification, I'll aim to post on that. Other goals that comes into mind and can be accomplished during that time, sure, I'll post on it if people want to know or just to you privately. 

As for internships, I may consider internships whether at NPS or possibly in architecture. I'm not interested in working for employers that treats 'interns' like they know absolutely nothing as if they never even had an intro course in architecture or historic preservation. The attitude of an employer will make a difference about whether I want to work or stay working with that employer. It would be abrasively rubbing at my patience to be subject to 8+ hours a day, 5 days a week or more, week after week to that kind of attitude. The typical attitude that I have seen from some employers I've had were annoying the f--- out of me. I don't mind insights that they may have but operate like a team of peers. If I work as an employee of someone, I would want to work for an employer that isn't an a--hole. I'm not that 'fresh out of high school' employee. I have some education and experiences. Respect that and I'd bet I would get along.


Dec 6, 17 10:05 pm
Non Sequitur

I'm not one for resolutions, but one thing I would like to do is learn how to tie a tie.... seriously, I've tried for years and just can't understand it.  

Dec 7, 17 8:46 am
Bench

Double-windsor or people will think less of you

Non Sequitur

All my ties are hung with double-windsor knots.

tie = symbol for penis (I already have one)

I default to a half-windsor knot myself.

The eldredge knot is my 2018 resolution.

Dec 8, 17 4:44 pm

The eldredge is too slow in a scuffle

RickB-Astoria

Like N.S., I'll have to learn to tie a tie so I can do so to save my ass (LOL). Well, sometimes, I can pull it off but I don't usually wear ties much. For the typical client and the residential and light commercial projects I have worked with, there hadn't been a need for wearing a tie but there is still the value of doing so. 


Dec 8, 17 10:29 pm

I don't do ties, it is a symbol of the man.

RickB-Astoria

Man.... I am the man. :-)

BTW: What man? Aren't you a little bit on the young side to be a hippy? You don't really look like a hippy. Where's the tie-die shirts.

RickB-Astoria

Here's a hippy and Oregon registered architect

The man in the tie dye shirt, bearded and all.

the boogeyman

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