Archinect
anchor

no school, no job decisions, just form please.

no_form
spatially, do home buyers prefer the segregated boxy spaces of cape cod houses compared to the shifting, folding, transparent, opaque complexity of the möbius house?

Cost being equal for sake of this discussion.
 
May 12, 15 11:28 am

In my experience, *most* US-ian home buyers like traditional boxy, center hall colonial/capecod/foursquare etc type houses but with a "great room" inserted somehow.

If you have an AirBnB in a cool Moebius house, though, renters will LOVE it. For a short term.

May 12, 15 11:32 am  · 
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no_form
But do the formal qualities of a box and great room hold more value in terms of comfort or beauty? Is the simplicity and tradition of construction of the cape somehow better or more interesting? Frank Gehry remodeled a cape that was featured on curbed recently. Proportionally it is blown up in scale but materially and spatially there is a harmonious relationship with the existing house.
May 12, 15 1:26 pm  · 
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curtkram

wouldn't simplicity typically mean it's easier to get from the bedroom to the coffee pot to the tv easier?

complexity and contradiction in architecture is great and all, but when it interferes with your ability to watch tv or whatever other fundamental activity it is that you use the house for, then it's novelty wears out quick.

May 12, 15 1:50 pm  · 
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Zbig

Some users find comfort in spaces that they can easily figure out. New and innovative works well for museums and monumental architecture because the discovery is part of the experience. Many people would enjoy having something whimsical about their house, but they fear market pressures because these elements of design would feel confusing to a visitor or potential buyer. In the US, we rarely see truly innovative residential work unless the clients are sure that they will live in the house for a long time.

May 12, 15 2:05 pm  · 
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toosaturated

highly customized homes are very hard to make changes to and to furnish

May 12, 15 2:31 pm  · 
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no_form
But how often do people remodel vs moving? Also, the spaces may seem confusing initially but if a buyer were interested they would discover how the house works.

Also in terms of form, for new construction a spatial concept such as the möbius house could work at a larger scale or any type of context and climate.

The other question I have is what larger theoretical ideas led UN Studio to do such a house?
May 12, 15 3:33 pm  · 
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Zbig

Back to the original question.

MOST home buyers prefer the boxiness and separated spaces of traditional architecture because it is a form that they know and that they can interact with.

A FEW home buyers will prefer a different concept such as UNStudio's Möbius House. This is a work that is very specific. You need a client that has the taste to enjoy it and the means to build it.

So, if you want to live your whole life in an innovative house and you have the means to commission the architect for the design and a builder with the capacity to build it, then OK, have the innovative house.

To the second question, let's see what UNStudio says (from their website):

"The organizational and formal structure of the private house is based on a double-locked torus, the mobius loop. The intertwining trajectory of the loop relates to the 24-hour living and working cycle of the family, where individual working spaces and bedrooms are aligned but collective areas are situated at the crossing points of the paths. In a similar manner these unfolding lines are materialized with glass and concrete, swapping the conventional use of these materials."

And the following link has Michael McGie's review:

https://michaelmcgie.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/mcgie-_evda-621-mobius-house.pdf

May 12, 15 4:30 pm  · 
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x-jla

^ most people like (from what Ive seen) an open plan for kitchen, living, and dining area and then a more traditional closed off plan for the other rooms...I would say that the less adventurous mid-century modern homes are probably the most desired in my area...even the ones in shambles sell like cheetos at a pot convention...Also, most people would be surprised that the demographic who seeks these homes is very diverse...I really dont believe that the public wants "traditional" homes...they want flexable and "clean" homes with good natural lighting and with quality materials...

May 12, 15 4:48 pm  · 
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x-jla

In landscape design its much different...most people want something more unique...mystery, serenity...etc.  gardens serve that function more than houses in the residential realm..Its not uncommon for a vlient to give me complete freedom within a budget...which is fun... 

May 12, 15 4:54 pm  · 
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toosaturated

Actually pretty often, more than half of my work are renovations. Buildings that can be easily adapted and reused are more valuable than those that are not. Reusing building/materials is one of the most sustainable things you can do if you're into that sort of thing. 

It's like trying to wear someone else shoes, it may fit initially but overtime your feet will not adjust itself to fit perfectly

May 13, 15 9:34 am  · 
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archanonymous

Raumplan. (this is me dropping the mic)

May 14, 15 11:15 pm  · 
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Didn't Möbius House burn down? Did they ever rebuild? That might answer the question so to speak...

May 18, 15 8:20 pm  · 
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no_form
Free plan (shouting from the audience)


Nam, houses of all different forms burn all the time and are not rebuilt.
May 19, 15 5:29 pm  · 
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archanonymous

new construction = free plan

historical (or otherwise) renovation = raumplan

May 20, 15 1:16 pm  · 
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