Archinect - News 2017-08-23T10:03:31-04:00 https://archinect.com/news/article/150017658/moscow-s-new-avant-garde-museum-opens-to-the-public Moscow's new Avant-Garde Museum opens to the public Anastasia Tokmakova 2017-07-14T17:22:00-04:00 >2017-07-15T06:25:14-04:00 <img src="https://d38w84nuu9j2kr.cloudfront.net/images/650x/h1/h15ydhfohrznhwqr.jpg" width="650" height="488" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>As government officials in Moscow earmark Constructivist buildings for demolition in a massive project to relocate up to 1.6 million of the city&rsquo;s residents, a non-profit museum dedicated to preserving Russia&rsquo;s avant-garde architecture has opened in the Shabolovka neighbourhood.</p></em><br /><br /><p>The new Avant-Garde Museum is located in Na Shabolovke Gallery, which is a part of&nbsp;Khavsko-Shabolovsky housing complex built in the late 1920s by the rationalist Asnova (Association of New Architects). It is part of a district with a rich heritage of early Soviet architecture and design, dominated by the famous hyperboloid Shukhov radio tower. Supported by private grants and volunteers, the museums features photographs, video footage, archaeological fragments, archival materials, blueprints, salvaged interior fittings such as door handle, and tools belonging to the tower's visionary engineer, Vladimir Shukov.&nbsp;</p> <p>"The idea for the space came from the local historian and activist Ilya Malcow, who has spent years collecting artifacts of the area&mdash;many of which are now on show at the museum. The neighborhood is unique, he says, because it was built virtually from scratch after the Bolshevik Revolution in 1917 to house workers for the new factories and institutions.&nbsp;</p> <figure><p><a href="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/1028x/hn/hntg4a4wbucbwvr4.jpg" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/1028x/hn/hntg4a4wbucbwvr4.jpg"></a></p><figcaption>Photo by Olga Alexeyenk...</figcaption></figure> https://archinect.com/news/article/150007483/thousands-protest-in-moscow-against-planned-demolition-of-soviet-era-housing-blocks Thousands protest in Moscow against planned demolition of Soviet-era housing blocks Alexander Walter 2017-05-15T14:46:00-04:00 >2017-05-15T15:02:04-04:00 <img src="https://d38w84nuu9j2kr.cloudfront.net/images/650x/xb/xbn45cqsslbjwhek.jpg" width="650" height="487" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>An interactive map of the former Soviet Union&rsquo;s Constructivist architectural heritage went online just days before the city of Moscow published a list of 4,500 apartment buildings proposed for demolition as part of a plan to relocate up to 1.6 million residents. Describe by many residents as a property grab [...] the demolition plan has proven so unpopular that thousands turned up for a demonstration against it in Moscow on Sunday 14 May carrying signs with slogans like &ldquo;My house is my castle&rdquo;.</p></em><br /><br /><p>"The plan has also alarmed preservationists," <em>The Art Newspaper</em> writes. "Initially described as an effort to upgrade residents from <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Khrushchyovka" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">pre-fabricated mass housing</a> built under Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev, the architectural targets have broadened and fears are mounting that it has become a carte-blanche for developers to destroy any building that stands in their way."</p><p><em>The Guardian</em>'s Alec Luhn <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2017/mar/31/moscow-biggest-urban-demolition-project-khrushchevka-flats" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">calls the demolition plans</a> "the most extensive Russian resettlement project in half a century," and some compare them to the forced collectivization of property under Stalin.</p> https://archinect.com/news/article/6337304/photographer-frederic-chaubin-s-weird-and-wonderful-soviet-architecture Photographer Frederic Chaubin's weird and wonderful Soviet architecture Paul Petrunia 2011-05-14T15:46:08-04:00 >2011-05-16T12:14:40-04:00 <img src="https://d38w84nuu9j2kr.cloudfront.net/images/650x/ck/ckjf6no0sl24qj7p.jpg" width="650" height="826" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>These weird, modernistic structures reveal a surprising freedom after the strict controls in 1920s Constructivism, Stalin's so-called Empire (or Gothic) style and Nikita Khrushchev's Modernism initiated in the '50s and '60s.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/loose.dtd"> <html><head><meta></head></html>