Archinect - News 2017-10-21T22:59:38-04:00 https://archinect.com/news/article/150023971/the-need-to-reclaim-public-spaces-from-white-supremacists The need to reclaim public spaces from white supremacists Julia Ingalls 2017-08-22T20:03:00-04:00 >2017-08-23T12:05:32-04:00 <img srcset="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/t6/t6u9cd7guocd63rh.jpeg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650 1x,https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/t6/t6u9cd7guocd63rh.jpeg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650&dpr=2 2x, https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/t6/t6u9cd7guocd63rh.jpeg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650&dpr=3 3x" src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/t6/t6u9cd7guocd63rh.jpeg?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650" border="0" title="" alt="" width="650" height="" /><p>In this article on the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/mob-space_us_59946e9be4b0eef7ad2c02ff" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Huffington Post</a>, Lance Hosey writes about the horror of watching white surpremacists marching in the Charlottesville Downtown Mall on August 11th and 12th of this year. The Mall, which was significantly redesigned in the 1970s, serves as a unavoidable visual reminder of the pressing need for architects, designers, and city planners to reclaim public spaces from hate groups. As Hosey explains, "In the 70s, when the late landscape architect Lawrence Halprin&nbsp;led a community-driven design process that closed East Main Street to cars, they had the foresight to lift the brick paving on pedestals and give room to breathe for the newly planted trees&rsquo; root system, and four decades later the majestic Willow Oaks are bigger than buildings. Strolling down the Mall is like a walk in the woods. On Friday evenings in summer, 'Charlottesville's living room' teems with life, the most vivid sense of community I have ever known."</p> <p>After describing the despicable events of the nig...</p> https://archinect.com/news/article/72031722/a-motor-city-missionary A Motor City Missionary Nam Henderson 2013-04-26T17:38:00-04:00 >2013-04-26T17:39:42-04:00 <img srcset="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/ra/rabpzycr8jrgn4hm.tiff?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650 1x,https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/ra/rabpzycr8jrgn4hm.tiff?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650&dpr=2 2x, https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/ra/rabpzycr8jrgn4hm.tiff?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650&dpr=3 3x" src="https://archinect.imgix.net/uploads/ra/rabpzycr8jrgn4hm.tiff?fit=crop&auto=compress%2Cformat&w=650" border="0" title="" alt="" width="650" height="" /><em><p>According to academics like Brent D. Ryan, author of &ldquo;Design After Decline: How America Rebuilds Shrinking Cities," it is one of the most ambitious privately financed urban reclamation projects in American history.</p></em><br /><br /><p> Earlier this month David Segal traveled to Detroit to look into the efforts/urban boosterim of Dan Gilbert, chairman of Quicken Loans. Using his real estate company, Bedrock Real Estate Services, Mr. Segal is renovating properties, building apartments and wooing corporate tenants. The goal is to remake Detroit (or at least some of it's downtown) into a high-tech hub, full of the 'creative class', high culture and young entrepreneurs. Mr. Segal also explored the context and cause for the current crisis and interviewed some locals who worry about the creation of "two Detroits".</p>