Archinect
anchor

'In design studios, they don't teach anything' - It is an underestimation, I think.

Dec 21 '13 1 Last Comment
Harshavardhan
Dec 21, 13 10:26 pm

'In architectural design studios, they don't teach anything.' I have come across this claim by many students when studying architecture in the first year or so. I think, this statement is one of underestimation, arrogance or ignorance.

In today's contemporary world, most architecture schools are revised and shifted as follows.

  1. They are more socioculturally inclusive.
  2. They encourage innovation, creativity and radical thinking.
  3. They keep us open-minded and we learn to accept new and different ideas about architectural designs.
  4. They are more integrated, less structured, more open ended and less regimented, meaning that we students have the greater responsibility (and of course, become self-disciplined) to be independent learners, think through design ourselves and make informed decisions.
  5. They are concerned with the scarcity of resources, devise problems/issues-oriented pedagogy and are more project-oriented. This means, we are exposed to cutting edge issues and projects, which prepares us for the real, unpredictable world. We are encouraged to think proactively, and be resourceful.

It is interesting to note that perceptions have changed in regards to these pedagogical changes (that have taken place in the last few decades), including mixed and many pejorative opinions. Many pedagogical changes have necessitated removal of teachable 'drafting skills', replacing them with 'design studio agenda'. This leaves those students who are virtually unable to learn themselves, refer to library resources and/or attend workshops, at a considerable disadvantage before they can embrace and settle in a demanding, self-directed architectural studio environment.

I would like to know interesting viewpoints and opinions on this thread please.

 

observant
Dec 21, 13 10:49 pm

'In architectural design studios, they don't teach anything.' I have come across this claim by many students when studying architecture in the first year or so. I think, this statement is one of underestimation, arrogance or ignorance.

I would like to know interesting viewpoints and opinions on this thread please.

I think it depends on the school's philosophy, the design professor, the studio's goal, and the overall chemistry created in the studio.

Who can't look back and see terms that were clearly inferior to others in terms of the studio education and environment?

I saw that studios called for student independence and resourcefulness.  It's useful to push a student to do the best they can within their means.  It is useless to push a student to be something they are not, including their designs.

By independence and resourcefulness, I agree with the the fact that the studios are project oriented, but I never felt they were open ended.  They definitely had a light at the end of the tunnel, and hopefully it wasn't a train coming the other way.  They wanted a finite solution, that's for sure.  The resourcefulness was person-specific.  It was amazing as to what studio people would catch, or miss, in terms of constructability, feasibility, fusion of programming issues learned in other courses or beforehand, merging a project with its context, and more.  Some people were working on sculptures within in a vacuum.  Others were working on projects that were well anchored and integrated with the context and its informing disciplines.

In a later studio, a professor should not be holding someone's hand.  Sometimes, economy of words is good.  One or two smart-ass comments that aren't overly mean spirited could make a student rethink some aspect of their design. 

The biggest problem in design studios is DIALOGUE.  Students don't often have the personalities or aptitude to help another studio mate and, conversely, people do not seek help.  They think it shows weakness.  They also reserve dialogue for professors, and sometimes don't assert themselves or ask further questions.  Being a profession filled with introverts and lone wolf smugness, should this be surprising?  That can't be fixed.

  • ×Search in:


Please wait... loading
Please wait... loading