Archinect
anchor

LEED Certification Question

Nov 25 '13 10 Last Comment
****melt
Nov 25, 13 9:28 am

Does anyone out there know if a building can become LEED certified AFTER construction has been completed?  Several years back I worked on a project that used LEED for the framework for their building but ultimately due to budget constraints they decided not to pursue LEED certification.  It was an existing building and the building was only partially renovated.  Now they are back, needing to expand and are looking in to LEED certification again.  Can the past renovation be certified or or only the newly remodeled part be taken into account.  Any insight would be greatly appreciated.

 

gruen
Nov 25, 13 2:46 pm

Doubt it. But the new work can be LEED.

curtkram
Nov 25, 13 3:49 pm

leed must be a new, ground-up design and construction, or major renovation.

i think this is covered under their supplemental guidance.

****melt
Nov 26, 13 8:39 am

Thanks Curtkram and gruen.  So "no" on a retroactive certification. That's what I recalled.  Existing O&M certification is for buildings that are already LEED certified, correct?  I'm currently swamped with deadlines so I haven't had time to go over the supplement with a fine tooth comb

curtkram
Nov 26, 13 9:27 am

maybe you can do this

http://www.usgbc.org/resources/leed-existing-buildings-v2009-current-version

and i think o&m might be available for unrated buildings, but i'm not sure

Janosh
Nov 26, 13 10:40 am

Curtkram is correct: LEED EB is the only system that will work for you.  It is available for both existing buildings which have never been certified, and recertification of previously certified buildings.  It is not identical to LEED-NC, so while you will get some credits for Energy and Water Efficiency, the points are more oriented towards operations (purchasing, cleaning, etc).

wurdan freo
Nov 26, 13 2:30 pm

You can always get the building energy star certified.

mces
Nov 26, 13 9:14 pm

If you did all LEED practice and paperworks. You can still submit the final review of the certification within two years after substantial project completion for your past renovation project. 

gruen
Nov 26, 13 11:25 pm

I doubt they did the paperwork. It's much more fussy than regular CA requirements. Also depends on the credits they are going for...for example how do you retroactively flush the building pre occupancy?

****melt
Nov 27, 13 9:34 am

We did not do any of the paperwork for the prior renovation and the initial project was finished in 2008 so I guess that's out.

Has anyone tried to go for two different certifications on one building at the same time? The building of topic has a rather interesting history.  It started out as one small building and over the years other additions were added, onto what is now a large building.  It is easily divisible into different phases.  For this phase we are just moving into another section/building.

wurdan freo
Nov 27, 13 10:58 am

so.... how would that be two different certifications? My understanding is that you have to classify the "current phase" as one certification. Most likely existing building or new construction. I worked on a project that was an existing building with 1,000,000 square feet, not certified. The new addition of 150,000sf was certified under NC. A future addition could be classified under existing building, but the reason they steered clear of that in the first place was to avoid having to deal with the existing 1,000,000 square feet. I''m still trying to figure out who really gives a shit if a building is LEED certified. Waste of money in my opinion.

  • ×Search in:


Please wait... loading
Please wait... loading