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Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts - Feasable?

Sep 19 '13 4 Last Comment
Roshi
Sep 19, 13 3:01 pm

Hello Archinect!

I currently hold a B.S.Arch degree from UIChicago, have been interning for a little over a year at FJG Architects (Mies's interns; they are all IIT grads and I have been lucky enough to be mentored under them. I learned more from my bosses than I have in 4 years at school).

It is now time for me to begin applying to graduate schools for my Masters, as it is required for my license. I have picked out all of my favorite programs in the states (Harvard, Yale, MIT, Sci-arc, Michigan, Cornell), but have been keeping one eye on schools outside of EU.

One that sticks out to me in particular is the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts. They have a very good 2-year program for their MArch, not to mention it is split up into 4 different options:

 

"You may apply for four different Master's programmes:

a) MA: Architecture in Urban Context (study dep. 2)

b) MA: Architecture, Process and Project Development (study dep. 3)

c) MA: Industrial Design in Architectural Contexts (study dep. 11)

d) MA: CITAstudio: Computation in Architecture (CITA)"

The program I believe will fit my goals the best is 'b'.

 

My questions:

1. Has anyone else applied/considered applying to this school? What do you think of it? Their application process seems to be very similar to state schools, outside of needing a GRE score, which I'm perfectly fine with.

2. How easy/hard is it to convert/process your Master's degree from a EU university when applying for a license in the States? I know it is NAAB accredited, but it can't be that easy.

3. How do the programs in EU different than those in the states? Will the software be different (ArchiCAD over Revit I imagine)? Is their building process that much different than that in the states?

 

Thank you!

 

Stephanie BraconnierStephanie Braconnier
Sep 19, 13 4:10 pm

Hi Gary,

I studied in dept. 11 in the inaugural English master's program and graduated in 2011. At that time there were only two options - dept. 2 and dept. 11, so I can't comment on the program you are interested in.

I have made a blog post about some general questions I get from students interested in the experience there;

http://synthetica.ca/copenhagenplusorminus/2012/7/29/a-guide-to-kunstakadamiets-arkitektskole.html

I also have a student blog on Archinect.

http://archinect.com/blog/21449043/my-blog

To answer your questions more specifically, I am in Canada so I don't know about your accreditation process. For myself, if I want to get licensed I should first get my degree accredited by NCARB (the Canadian version of NAAB), which is basically about paying a large non-refundable fee for them to look over the courses I took and decide if it's equivalent to a Canadian accredited degree.

From there I would begin the normal internship process to get the experience outlined by law in Canada. I assume it's kinda the same for you, more or less in that order. If I had kept living in DK after graduating (which was impossible because of visa restrictions, that may now have been changed), I could practice as an architect straight away since they don't distinguish between licensed and unlicensed. In other EU countries I could follow each country's particular guidelines but when I graduated I got a 'degree equivalency' package which could show another EU country that I had fulfilled the ECTS credits required to become an architect. When I worked in Berlin, my title was 'architektin' (female architect, how PC) regardless of whether I was registered or not.

Since I now practice in landscape urbanism & public space design, it's not on my mind to get licensed in Canada so more or less I don't bother thinking on it ;)

I am not sure about other programs in the EU but at KARCH the approach is very hands off. The semester was composed of a series of intensive week-long workshops near the beginning of the semester, followed by a single design project. They view design as the most important course and so half of your credits are derived from design (i.e., don't fail this course....)

You get most of your 'elective' credits by participating in the workshops; then there are some courses that run alongside your design course: History and Theory and a technical course "TEK 5" (comes after TEK 1-4, which happen in the bachelor year so you don't have to worry about it). There are some optional work shops you can take if you feel like you have time; these are mostly computer programs but are often taught only in Danish. However, you can go along anyways and usually someone will try to translate for you. We learned Rhino & 3D Studio Max, you could also take ArchiCAD and other programs.

Hope this helps, and best of luck.

Stephanie BraconnierStephanie Braconnier
Sep 19, 13 4:27 pm

and of course by NCARB I mean the CACB. Too many damn acronyms in this profession!

Gary PolkGary Polk
Sep 19, 13 11:53 pm

Stephanie,

Thank you so much! Its a top choice for me right now. Its very cheap too (5000 euros for foreign students? really?) and I've been to Copenhagen before and I absolutely love it. My only worry is that they are extremely selective with their foreign students (they only get 10 outside of EU) apparently.

I got more questions but I'll just refer to your blog.

Marina CMMarina CM
Feb 5, 14 6:04 pm

Hey!

 

I'm from the EU and I think they have a good MArch program there. It is definetely a very good choice, good quality and low tuition!! As low as free if you are an EU student or Danish permanent resident. Also, the Danish Government offers scholarships for International students, they give you a monthly stipend of about 700 E... check that out in the KADK webpage! Yes they are selective... but it's worth trying!

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