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The "forgotten" M.Arch. schools - hmmm

Mar 5 '13 64 Last Comment
observant
Mar 5, 13 7:29 pm

Either this forum has some real go-getter intellectuals and/or the people who apply to these schools aren't represented here.

For those looking at their FIRST M.Arch., there are a whole bunch of schools NOT mentioned, and all over the country: 

  1. U Tennessee Knoxville
  2. U Kansas (aka KU)
  3. U Wisconsin - Milwaukee
  4. U Illinois - UC
  5. U Nebraska Lincoln
  6. U Maryland - College Park (Wash DC)
  7. U Minn.
  8. UNC Charlotte
  9. U New Mexico
  10. U Utah
  11. U Oregon (surprisingly not mentioned, yet CU-Denver was a time or two)

Is anybody on here a product of these grad schools, especially for M.Arch. with unrelated backgrounds?  Is anyone applying to these schools, and would they go as back-ups?

http://www.arch.virginia.edu/files/resources/UVa_Arch_StudentProfile2011.pdf

Some are mentioning UVa.  I just found this ^.  Interesting!  Look at the stats for 2011 in the SECOND box.  For 3 year (Path A): 11 people.  For 2 year (Path B): 15 people.  Look at the distribution of previous majors for those 11 people:  allied arts, engineering, and 1 from science, French, and music - that's it! I look at the average GPAs and GREs, and they said mine weren't high enough, back then.  Mine were way higher than what's displayed for 2011.  They are on the "ivory tower" side, that's for sure.  Anyone applying to UVa this year?

 

domestico
Mar 5, 13 10:54 pm

SUNY at Buffalo led by Omar Kahn looks like an interesting/different program not dicussed much.  University of Kentucky as well, led by Micheal Speaks. 

Tanuja
Mar 5, 13 11:10 pm

I'm applying to U of Oregon. It is actually my first "realistic" choice. However I just got into Syracuse so I don't know if Oregon would be my first choice anymore.

juventus7
Mar 5, 13 11:14 pm

Thanks for doing this. U of Oregon is supposed to be #1 or top3 according to a recent Arch Record magazine in sustainability. I am not surpised when looking at their history/context. I did my B. of Arts in Architecture at U of New Mexico. I can only speak good things about it and seems to be improving every year, and also to mention that it has perhaps the nicest architecture department building of all the country from what I have seen.

Joseph WassellJoseph Wassell
Mar 5, 13 11:14 pm

I've gotten very used to Buffalo being on the "forgotten" list.  

I was strongly considering Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI).  Haven't seen much talk of them either.

Tanuja ManoharTanuja Manohar
Mar 5, 13 11:21 pm

@ juventus7

yeah I've heard U of Oregon is at the top for sustainability right now. I'm really surprised I haven't heard more people applying there. Or maybe they just aren't on the forum

juventus7
Mar 5, 13 11:33 pm

@Tanuja - yes I am surprised as well. I am applying there and it's one of my tops, if not the top. I just guess its a different mentality about architecture, from what I have seem it seems very humble, pragmatic, logical . They are not trying to invent warm water (a saying we have in Spanish) and create the next star architects , but are rather trying just to teach good architecture that is environmentally conscious. I like that.

Tanuja ManoharTanuja Manohar
Mar 5, 13 11:49 pm

@ juventus7

Yeah haha! We don't hear back until April 1st I believe. How do you think your chances are based on your  GPA, GRE, and portfolio?

observant
Mar 6, 13 12:23 am

Guys and gals:  U of Oregon pounds the word "sustainability" into people's heads.  I just wish that word would go away and it would be replaced by "environmentally responsible design."  THAT concept was actually around before sustainability became the buzz word.   We studied the consequences of thermal heat/gain loss based on building orientation, building efficiency, and energy saving systems have always been trickling onto the scene in the work place.  U of Oregon is reasonably competent, but they are not humble.  They are also on the quarter system ... still.  Architecture works better on semesters and many profs have weighed in on that, per some article I read while in school.  Still, if you get U of O and not the others, that's not a bad way to go.

As for juventus's UNM comment, a +2 person from there merged into my M.Arch. curriculum and was one of the nicest people I met.  She was very laid back.  She practices in Denver.

Tanuja ManoharTanuja Manohar
Mar 6, 13 2:55 am

@ observant

U of O or Syracuse? The better school overall

New ARch
Mar 6, 13 3:27 am

I'm applying to UNC, UNM, and Temple. These are my back up schools.

I wish I had applied to U of Oregon. I didn't, because I thought I might have a chance to get scholarship from other universities. It seems that I was wrong.

Anyone heard back from UNC???

They said they would send the admission notifications on 4th March.

@ juventus7

I'd like to know more about UNM?

How is the school overall?

I'm really considering going there, when I compare the tuitions. Have heard that many international students pay in state tuition. Is it worth going to UNM?

vado retro
Mar 6, 13 8:08 am

UNM is across from the Frontier. It is worth it just for that. As far as intellectual go getters go my forgotten classmates had undergrad degrees (in other fields) from sad sack places like Georgetown, The Naval Academy, UIUC, Michigan, UCDavis, Notre Dame to name a few.

agoodwinbrown
Mar 6, 13 9:47 am

@ observant - I applied to UVa. I actually saw that profile you posted back when I was creating my short list of schools. Still decided to shoot for them even though it seems they like a very diverse background. I'm also hoping for AP because of my ENDS degree. So we shall see about that.......

I'm also looking at UBC and CU Denver as far as the "forgotten" list goes. Maybe UBC isn't so forgotten. I don't see much talk about them except for that thread started a few days back.

I'm pretty excited about CU Denver (no word yet, though). Great city dynamic to study architecture in. A colleague earned his Masters of Architecture there and said the professional networking there is to notch. They get that sustainability tag like Oregon, but I tend to gravitate towards practical schools anyways. Like mentioned before, I just look through that buzz word to see the meat of the programs. Any CU Denver grads? Any comments from anyone regarding the school?

I studied at Texas A&M and have been working for the last 3 years professionally. I tried to shoot for some more theoretical programs like UCLA and Berkeley to supplement all my practical senses and knowledge. However, I've already received a no from UCLA and more than likely a no from Berkeley since I haven't heard anything. Portfolio didn't speak to anything up in the clouds. What a shame. Would have been a great supplement to my education.

Bwatson
Mar 6, 13 10:11 am

I applied to U of oregon , with no arch background, its my first cholce for many reasons , one of them being mainly cost, TA  spots are offered after the first year, and the cost of living in Oregon is practicaly nothing

Quentin
Mar 6, 13 12:29 pm

I went to UMD/Univ of Maryland for undergrad. I wasn't that big of a fan of their program. However that was 2005-09'. Hopefully it's improved since. I know a few who stayed for their Masters. I should check to see how they liked it. Also there are even smaller less popular schools that offers MArch that aren't listed.

observant
Mar 6, 13 1:25 pm

@ observant

U of O or Syracuse? The better school overall

I wish I could help you here.  I know Syracuse IS a good program, and a good school.  So is Oregon's.  I think the vibe at U of O would be like going to school at Santa Cruz. Look at the money you have available.  If it came down to U of O and ASU, have a good talk with practitioners and also look at whether you'd want to live in wet and scenic ... or dry and dramatic desertscape.  Also, Oregon doesn't have the wherewithal to hold all of its grads (BArch + MArch various), so many seek and get work in California.

U of O doesn't like business undergrads.  I worked it into my essay and they did NOT like that.  I was not admitted.

observant
Mar 6, 13 1:31 pm

I'm pretty excited about CU Denver (no word yet, though). Great city dynamic to study architecture in. A colleague earned his Masters of Architecture there and said the professional networking there is to notch. They get that sustainability tag like Oregon, but I tend to gravitate towards practical schools anyways. Like mentioned before, I just look through that buzz word to see the meat of the programs. Any CU Denver grads? Any comments from anyone regarding the school?

Where I would have gone without hesitation had I the chance to do it again.  I went to a higher ranked and better reputed school, but the design profs were hit and miss, while everything else was top notch.  You can't have 6 or 7 studios, and have half the design profs be duds who are "checked out" ... either ready to retire, or showing up late because of their own gigs.

CU-Denver also has internships as electives within the curriculum in the 3rd year.  They also use a summer, and not a 7th semester.  Can't beat that.  Out in 3 years ... and you're in Denver which may not be San Francisco or Seattle, but it's nice enough. CU-Denver's curriculum was even more practical when I was shopping.  It's still practical enough.

observant
Mar 6, 13 1:38 pm

UNM is across from the Frontier. It is worth it just for that. As far as intellectual go getters go my forgotten classmates had undergrad degrees (in other fields) from sad sack places like Georgetown, The Naval Academy, UIUC, Michigan, UCDavis, Notre Dame to name a few.

I think it's a fine place.  Keep in mind, though, that with impressive prior schools like that, one has to wonder why they didn't get into a lot of the ones everyone else and their brother is chasing per the "Commiserate" thread.  Most likely, it was their portfolio.  There are SOME of the above schools for which a portfolio is, or has been, optional.  Wondering how someone relaxes their Naval Academy breeding and starts using words like "fabric, context, vocabulary, entry sequence, and fenestration" in a-school.  That would be interesting.  There was an ex-military guy in school with me and he didn't let his "butch" guard down for a second.  He was cool and easy to get along with in studio.  You just had to morph a little and get onto HIS page.

observant
Mar 6, 13 2:34 pm

Re UNM -  uses 2nd summer and not a 7th semester which would push out to December - scroll down to 3-1/2 year - it's a little hard to read in vertical columns:

Good curriculum - can use electives for more environ tech (lighting, etc.) ; too bad no additional structures elective(s) - many different ways to cap off the degree in Yr. 3 (thesis, final project, or studio):

http://catalog.unm.edu/catalogs/2012-2013/colleges/architecture/architecture/graduate-program.html

vado retro
Mar 6, 13 2:41 pm

I think it's a fine place.  Keep in mind, though, that with impressive prior schools like that, one has to wonder why they didn't get into a lot of the ones everyone else and their brother is chasing per the "Commiserate" thread.  Most likely, it was their portfolio.  There are SOME of the above schools for which a portfolio is, or has been, optional.  Wondering how someone relaxes their Naval Academy breeding and starts using words like "fabric, context, vocabulary, entry sequence, and fenestration" in a-school.  That would be interesting.  There was an ex-military guy in school with me and he didn't let his "butch" guard down for a second.  He was cool and easy to get along with in studio.  You just had to morph a little and get onto HIS page.

I would explain it to you if you didn't annoy me so much.

Tanuja ManoharTanuja Manohar
Mar 6, 13 2:45 pm

@ obervant Thanks! I don't mind living anywhere as long as its a good school...I can't have weather as a criteria since I'm from Cali and its hard to beat Cali weather! Also, will be harder to find a job in Cali after going to the east coast for school?

observant
Mar 6, 13 2:53 pm

I would explain it to you if you didn't annoy me so much.

I  can't be something I'm not, retro.  I don't feel like changing my personality to befriend ONE or TWO people in cyberspace.  My opinionated, direct, and no BS style is either love it or hate it.  I'm quite used to that.  Still, I would love to hear the UNM story.  Many 3 year classes are self-contained dramas and/or sitcoms, and would be good fodder for TV stuff.

curtkram
Mar 6, 13 2:56 pm

i know people from

2.  U Kansas (aka KU)
and went to
4.  U Illinois - UC (UIUC, Urbana/Champaign; Univerisity of Illinois at Chicago is commonly referred to as UIC)

for grad school and
5.  U Nebraska Lincoln

for undergrad.

i don't watch school threads much, so i might let this fade into obscurity.  just figured you asked and i would let you know #s 4 and 5 are represented and #2 is somewhere around here.

observant
Mar 6, 13 3:08 pm

@ obervant Thanks! I don't mind living anywhere as long as its a good school...I can't have weather as a criteria since I'm from Cali and its hard to beat Cali weather! Also, will be harder to find a job in Cali after going to the east coast for school?

I can't lie to you.  It IS more work to transport a degree back across country for work, unless it's one that has a lot of mystique attached to it.  Ivy types seem to get jobs in the West and they seem to love Berkeley in the east.  But it can be done.  I went to a wedding near San Francisco, and one of the women seated at my table was a graduate of Syracuse's 3 year arch. program, for example, and working in the city.  This was in 2004. 

If in an urban school, practitioners will come onto campus for guest lectures, to teach courses, and possibly even to identify future talent.  At my school, I was offered jobs in two different cities as a result of these interactions (face to face, over them taking a group of people out to dinner) and because, let's face it, they judge on appearance, how you speak when you are introducing speakers, and whatnot.  However, those cities did not interest me, though they were good firms - better than what I got on my own.  Oh well. I was BROKE and had to "go home."

I brought a very good but "non-mystique" program back to a coastal area and saw that it was more work and I had to battle the "alumni club" preference in some cases.  Over time, it evens out.  When you do get back "home," work your butt off and network your butt off.  If you can obtain an extra "relevant" certificate at night, that can always be prominently displayed on your resume and an additional source of connections.

observant
Mar 6, 13 3:25 pm

and went to
4.  U Illinois - UC (UIUC, Urbana/Champaign; Univerisity of Illinois at Chicago is commonly referred to as UIC)

Curt, were you a 3+ year or a 2 year?  If a 2 year, where did you go before?

curtkram
Mar 6, 13 3:43 pm

i got a 4 year BS from UNL then 2 year MArch from UIUC.  had a stint at oklahoma state before that too.  i think they were the 5 year BArch, and i was in an architectural engineering program.  seemed like a good idea at the time.

you seem scorned.  perhaps you've mentioned this elsewhere, but is there something really dogging you?  did you get kicked out of architecture school?  did you get kicked out of a few architecture schools?  do you blame the schools for something horrible that happened in your life?  have you told us where you graduated from?  it's not fair for others to answer your questions if you can't ask them.

maybe it will help if you count the number of posts you've made across the many threads here where you are concerned about avenues of education and then think about how many is probably too many :)

temporality
Mar 6, 13 3:51 pm

Many 3 year classes are self-contained dramas and/or sitcoms, and would be good fodder for TV stuff

I laughed pretty hard after reading this. Another thread should be created to discuss the soap opera drama that happens between architecture students. I always thought my class could make a great sitcom with all the characters we have.

Tanuja
Mar 6, 13 4:43 pm

@ observant So I have a chance to come back to socal, that's good to know!! The east coast has better schools than the west for the most part. I got into woodbury and its a good school but I don't think it compares to Syracuse. Correct me if I'm wrong

Tanuja ManoharTanuja Manohar
Mar 6, 13 4:44 pm

When I say west coast I mean Cali

observant
Mar 6, 13 4:56 pm

you seem scorned.  perhaps you've mentioned this elsewhere, but is there something really dogging you?  did you get kicked out of architecture school?  did you get kicked out of a few architecture schools?  do you blame the schools for something horrible that happened in your life?  have you told us where you graduated from?  it's not fair for others to answer your questions if you can't ask them.

No, to the bold.  You analyze me more than others here.  Really simple story.  Has a BS in an unrelated field.  Initial interest was in a B.Arch.  Didn't do it.  Took freehand drawing, measured perspective drawing (rarely offered and which I used in arch school for graphics, and which they didn't teach), 3 terms of construction drawings (manual drafting) and calculus (again), to prepare for M.Arch, at a community or local college.  Applied to 8.  Got into 4.  Got through M.Arch. 3 with the highest tier of honors  and on time, following the schedule to a tee.  Some marginal design profs, but no bad tech/struct/hist/elective profs. Took AutoCad at a comm. college for $300 after graduating, albeit offered in a-school.  Got a job in 1.5 months after starting search.  Some resentments:  (1) did not get my top choice for 3 year, and it was no Ivy or Berkeley - talked to a prof on the admissions committee there and said they were sharply divided on my application, and that he had given me a high score (he was in the practical side of the curriculum and licensed, so I figured he would), (2) wished I had gone to either CU-Denver, Georgia Tech, or even Univ. of Florida of the ones that took me, and  (3) very lax admission to my school with low portfolio weight, and some people who should have been screened better dropped out ... they couldn't design their way out of a paper bag (chem. eng., nursing, and urban planning).  I really wanted to grow from the experience and thought school would be about the free exchange of ideas and students helping each other better their designs, the same way that is done in an office, but they were doltish introverts with their headphones on under tents hoisted in studio spaces.  I like intellectual and philosophical dialogue and, sure, that may very well lead to debate and even discord. Did not care for my unrelated undergrad curriculum but, damn, I had a blast in that school.  Liked my a-school curriculum tremendously, but the school was far from a blast, and I'm talking its milieu and not the hard work which did not phase me.  Do I come across like someone who would get kicked out of school?  No.  A- and A student, respectively, and GRE around the 90th percentile for grad, which they also use for the graduate hard sciences and engineering.  I like writing about this topic because I like pointing out things to students making this decision, especially to the 3 year folks for whom that will be their architectural "alma mater" for life.  For the 4+2s, with both degrees in architecture, it's less of an issue, because they may like one school and not the other.  I've also taught as an adjunct in the evenings at community colleges and in lower division of non-flagship campuses, so I place a high premium on being both an educator ... and a student.

observant
Mar 6, 13 5:00 pm

@ observant So I have a chance to come back to socal, that's good to know!! The east coast has better schools than the west for the most part. I got into woodbury and its a good school but I don't think it compares to Syracuse. Correct me if I'm wrong.

Syracuse is better than Woodbury, unless Woodbury has really come along in the last couple of decades.  For other stuff they teach, they are not that highly ranked.  Again, ask current LA practitioners.  But you've also got ASU in "the hopper," no?

mfischer3387
Mar 6, 13 5:08 pm

Hey all, sorry I'm a bit late to the convo. I'm a graduate of U of O's B.Arch program, and since there's a ton of overlap through most of the program's studios/core classes with the grad program, I thought maybe I could weigh in, especially since there's a lot of options. I'm also 3+ years out of the program at this point, and keep in touch with a lot of grad students who still live in the NW (some of the profiles of those are featured on Archinect, so browsing through them gives you an idea of where I'm coming from)

All the comments so far have been fairly accurate. Yes, Oregon prides itself on teaching sustainable practices, and certainly, its not as theoretical as say, UCLA might be. I think it carries a lot of weight here in the NW, with firms in Seattle and Portland, and stretching down to SF as well. Obviously there's the option of doing your masters in Eugene or Portland. Both have strengths, and certainly, if you fancy trying to break into the PDX arch. job market (which is surprisingly hard considering the size of the city compared to the design jobs), or come from/want a city background, then its a no brainier. Having done my B.Arch in Eugene, its a great city, and there's been some investment to upgrade the facilities, but PDX's campus is much more competitive to what you would experience in a professional firm setting.

I'd also say there's a difference in the teaching experience you get on both campuses. PDX is driven by professionals and practicing architects, who can have a more modern attitude toward design than some of the faculty in Eugene. Though, the Eugene campus has much more opportunities to build a bond with faculty members, and they are certainly more enthusiastic about getting involved in your projects than at PDX.

Like I said, two different campuses, but definitely an all-around good program. If there's any specific question I can answer, let me know. I'll definitely check back soon.

Tanuja ManoharTanuja Manohar
Mar 6, 13 5:10 pm

@observant Woodbury's M.Arch program is new. I believe this year is the first graduating class for the 3 year and they are getting accredited this year I believe. Yes, I have ASU which I know is a great program. Where did you go?

observant
Mar 6, 13 8:08 pm

Gosh, Tanuja, with all the opinionated things I say on here?  Answer:  someplace good, reputable, a good fit academically, and not one of my top choices.  That Woodbury's M.Arch. program is new is kind of eh ... I didn't know that.  I know that ASU's 3 year is newer, but has been around long enough for the concrete to dry.

Tanuja ManoharTanuja Manohar
Mar 6, 13 8:28 pm

Hahaha okay I guess you don't have to answer.

observant
Mar 6, 13 8:33 pm

But since I grew up in both the NYC and LA areas, we probably lived fairly close to each other at one time or another.  And I did take an art course at CSU Long Beach one summer.  Like they say, 6 degrees ...

Noypi
Mar 6, 13 8:51 pm

I applied to these "forgotten" schools lol. Just got the admittance letter from UMN today. Still waiting on UO and UVa

Tanuja ManoharTanuja Manohar
Mar 6, 13 8:58 pm

@observant How funny, my undergrad was in design at csu long beach.

observant
Mar 6, 13 9:06 pm

I know.  I saw that when you first started posting, merely to gauge how much of a geographic trek you were doing for the schools which interested you.

Now, please don't make comments, since you are an "open book" as far as your profile goes.  I don't forget names, especially foreign ones.  The dude who taught my class was Bhupendra Singhal.  I thought he was just another run of the mill faculty member.  He was actually higher than that at CSULB in the food chain.  What did I personally think of him?  A completely disinterested jerk.  It turned out we had relatives in from overseas that summer, so I dropped the class.  Again, don't comment.  I retook it at Santa Monica College (comm. coll.) and finished it.  Not only was it cheaper, I had a better teacher ... who conveyed being more interested in the students.

clack
Mar 6, 13 9:44 pm

@noypi - how did you get your notification at UMN?  Congrats!

Tanuja ManoharTanuja Manohar
Mar 6, 13 9:51 pm

I see.Well glad you liked the SMC class better, guess it all worked out

Noypi
Mar 6, 13 9:58 pm

@clack- Thanks! Physical letter came in today. I was like "the hell, people still use paper mail?" lol

observant
Mar 6, 13 9:58 pm

I should clarify.  I think the CSULB dude was obviously competent, but I think he had a "chemistry" issue with me, since I was there as a non-matriculated student taking a class toward the preparation of a portfolio.  It was a perspective drawing course (forgot if coded as an art or design department course).  Yes, SMC had a really cool teacher who would walk around and joke with us while we were drawing, and a group of us became friends and would go out to watering holes or for grub on the west side after that evening class.  At that point, I already had my degree and was picking up night/summer classes here and there to meet arch. school prereqs. and ways to put together portfolio items.

juventus7
Mar 7, 13 10:46 am

@vado retro... Frontier!!! Eating in that place make studying at UNM worth it alone... Did you go to UNM?

@newarch

UNM is a school that is growing a lot. They are trying very very hard to make it more known around the states and the world. To get an scholarship to pay in state tuition is not hard, it is the "amigo" scholarship. It is not an expensive school which is a great thing. Academically the school is good , the level among the students there can vary, they still admit students with no so good academic backgrounds (among the undergrads). But if you work hard yourself you will get a great education. There are some great professors at the school, Stephen Dent, Kramer Woodard, Kritina Yu are some professors I think we're fantastic and know a lot. Also, the fact that they decided to build a new state-of-the art building tells you about their ambitions, it's called Pearl Hall and its an amazing place to study architecture for its facilities and te environment of interdisciplinary collaboration it creates. The environment among the school is one of friendship, collaboration, sharing and interest. I did not feel at all that environment of competitiveness at the school; which I liked. The state of New Mexico is amazing if you like outdoors, hikes, good weather and amazing food. I would also take into account that Albuquerque is one of the fastest growih cities in the country. Let me know if you have any other questions!

observant
Mar 7, 13 11:52 am

The environment among the school is one of friendship, collaboration, sharing and interest. I did not feel at all that environment of competitiveness at the school; which I liked.

Good to hear, actually.  As it should be.  The one UNM person I met in grad was reflective of that.  True, when you have an open-admission school at the undergraduate level, like UNM or UNLV, it's all too likely that some not so talented students will get in.  Since vadro retro flat out told me I was annoying (LOL), do you know what might have been the reason some graduates of top schools headed to UNM for 3 year, since graduates of top schools love the big name East Coast schools or other creme de la creme schools?  Was the portfolio requirement not as emphasized and they got in on their schools and grades?  If you know, that is ...

vado retro
Mar 7, 13 12:15 pm

the unm undergraduate program is not an open admission. one must take core design studios and apply to be admitted to the school.

unm's graduate program offer a non architectural graduate degree. to be admitted one must provide a portfolio, a statement of intent, letters of recommendation(one of mine was from a professor who eventually headed the neh)., transcripts etc. this sort of program draws a wide variety of people from different backgrounds who have for their own reasons decided to pursue an architecture degree. the first year of this program is spent in an intense studio environment after which students either go into the mix with fourth year studio or, if they are very good, move to graduate studio work.

people go to unm because it is in new mexico.

juventus7
Mar 7, 13 12:16 pm

@obervant

I dont know what THE reason might have been for those students to go to UNM with those previous degrees. But from my 5 years living in New Mexico many people moved there for reasons such weather, low cost tuition, life-style, culture, etc. I think the southwest is a very nice place to live. It is very different from the NE where people seem to be very fast paced, stressed out, competitive, etc. Its actually very nice to live in Albuquerque. Its amazing weather, calm place, people are very very friendly and things move at a slower pace. I also worked in an architecture/sustainability consultant firm and it was great... I went to work everyday wearing flip-flops, shorts and t-shirt, the principals as well. The firm bought beer and soft drinks every week so you could work and have a beer or two during the day at your station. The hours good, everyone left at 4 PM and went home or to do something else for fun. And the work got done all the time. Maybe I was lucky, but that kind of lifestyle seems to be the trend there. Its just another culture, more tranquil and slow paced. I personally like that. Maybe that is what attracts people to go there, sometimes it is not only about work but to have a balanced life (Thats subjective though). I would also add that the architectural design around the southwest is great in my opinion, I believe it is very unique in concept and style, rooted in place and you can find great architects there such as predock, rick joy, w. burnette, b. prince, will bruder among many others. 

vado retro
Mar 7, 13 12:18 pm

@vado retro... Frontier!!! Eating in that place make studying at UNM worth it alone... Did you go to UNM?

Yes. Kramer was on my committee. This was back in the day before the new school was built.

observant
Mar 7, 13 12:26 pm

b. prince, will bruder

Bart Prince?  LOL.  Is he still in demand?  His organic, hippiesh houses seemed so out of place, even in the 90s.  Bart Price came to speak once.  He seems more like he should star in western movies than be an architect.

Bruder.  Yes.  His style is definitely his own.  The only two works I've seen are the PHX public library and the Northern Nevada Museum of Art.  I'm not a fan of the metallic wrapping he likes to use.

Sounded like a laid-back place to go to school. 

juventus7
Mar 7, 13 12:38 pm

@observant

I am not a big fan of Bart Prince's work either, but well, I give him credit for breaking out of the norm. I used to see him walking his dog around in the neighborhood. It was an interesting/different experience to be inside one of his houses tough. Yes, its a laid-back place to be, I would definitely like to retire over there when I am older or even when I have a family. 

vado retro
Mar 7, 13 12:43 pm

i'm sure i pulled as many all nighters as any ivy league architecture student.

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