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Studying architecture in Europe?

Feb 1 '13 4 Last Comment
Harry:)
Feb 1, 13 2:08 pm

Hi everyone,

I am a 16 year old currently thinking about studying architecture when I leave school in 2 years. Due to the high tuition costs in the UK I am considering doing a Masters degree in architecture in another European Union country, probably Spain.

I understand that the course in Spain takes 5 years to complete but I am concerned about whether the fact that I have studied in Spain would make RIBA registration more difficult. 

 

The RIBA website says:

''Under the provisions of this Directive, qualifications or registration status gained in the European Union may be accepted in the United Kingdom by the Architects Registration Board (ARB).


Architects qualified via the EU Directive need not sit the Part 3 Professional Practice Examination in order to register. However, the RIBA recommends undertaking Part 3 as a useful introduction to UK building legislation and contracts.

EU qualified architects may apply to become an RIBA Chartered Member  after a period of five years' approved post-qualification professional practice experience, as documented by a comprehensive curriculum vitae.  Whilst undertaking this experience, RIBA Associate Membership is available.   However, in order to reduce this required period of professional experience, EU qualified architects who undertake and pass a recognised UK Part 3 examination may apply for Chartered Membership immediately afterwards. ''

 

As I would like to become fully qualified as soon as possible and be able to work in the UK, I would most likely undertake the UK Part 3 examination which is after working 2 years in an architectural practice. However, would Part 3 be a lot more difficult considering that I would not have been working to UK building regulations for the 5 years of the Masters degree in Europe? Would it also be more difficult to get a work placement for the 2 years in an architectural practice considering that I would not have done the degree in the UK and would it affect my employability in the future?

 

Thanks in advance :)

 

mtt9999
Feb 1, 13 2:46 pm

"As I would like to become fully qualified as soon as possible and be able to work in the UK, I would most likely undertake the UK Part 3 examination which is after working 2 years in an architectural practice."

Slow down there... what's the big rush. It doesn't matter if you get your license when you are 25 or 28... take your time and enjoy life a little. And you can work in a UK office immediately after you graduate from University in Spain, even without a license.

"Would it also be more difficult to get a work placement for the 2 years in an architectural practice considering that I would not have done the degree in the UK and would it affect my employability in the future?"

I don't think these things matter as much as you think - it is more about your ability and the connections you establish during school. They could honestly care less about your RIBA qualifications when you have just graduated.

Harry:)
Feb 1, 13 3:25 pm

Thanks for the reply :)

 

Slow down there... what's the big rush. It doesn't matter if you get your license when you are 25 or 28... take your time and enjoy life a little. And you can work in a UK office immediately after you graduate from University in Spain, even without a license.

I thought you had to register with the ARB and RIBA before you could legally work here. Do you not need a license from them?

I don't think these things matter as much as you think - it is more about your ability and the connections you establish during school. They could honestly care less about your RIBA qualifications when you have just graduated

But surely you need RIBA qualifications to be able to work? I wouldn't have the relevant qualifications to work in the UK unless I did level 3 would I? 

Gjalt
Feb 1, 13 3:52 pm

You won't be able to call yourself an Architect unless you got RIBA qualified (or any sort of qualification in any european country). This doesn't stop you from working in an architectural office and work on your skills as a designer/project manager

mtt9999
Feb 1, 13 5:44 pm

It would be almost impossible to get RIBA qualifications if you could not work in the country until you got them. It is the same in the United States - each intern architect has to put in a few years of work before they can take their exams and get licensed.

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