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How to ventilate 2nd floor library from the floor slab (precedents?)

Dec 30 '12 4 Last Comment
gentle puppies
Dec 30, 12 3:10 am

I'm working on a 2-storey public building with a library on the 2nd floor (which has an 8m high exposed roof/ceiling), and am trying to avoid ruining that ceiling with ductwork, by having with a single plenum space containing ducts & VAV boxes for both floors.  The rationale is that feeding the air from a lower height should reduce the loads on the system, right?

I was told that with the volume of air required to vent the large space, low-level diffusers would create unacceptable wind conditions, and was also told that a raised floor (which would have allowed for many, smaller diffusers in the floor) was not structurally feasible with the weight of the stacks.  Yet this was achieved at the Vancouver Public Library (http://www.flickr.com/photos/datagazetteer/6258693783/)... any insights into this?
 

Also...

The baggage-area vents at the Madrid airport... what's the term for that type of vent?  I've been trying to find smaller-scale examples of it, but have no idea what keywords to use.  I'm thinking spot punctures through the floor slab (feeding 2nd floor from plenum space under floor slab) might be the solution here.

 

jackarch
Dec 30, 12 12:21 pm

Raised floor can have various load capacities-there are models that will meet your specific structural requirements.
The vents shown in the Vancouver photos are probably part of the raised floor system product line.
Contact raised floor vendors and have them show you what they can do for your situation.

accesskb
Dec 30, 12 7:50 pm

"The rationale is that feeding the air from a lower height should reduce the loads on the system, right?"

From what I understand, its best to locate supply vents low on the ground and return vents somewhere up near the ceiling.  Stale air (hot air) naturally rises and is easily drawn out by return vents located above. 

gentle puppies
Dec 31, 12 3:56 pm

Assuming that for the sake of maintaining the current floor-to-floor height between ground and 2nd floors, without compromising the head room for the first floor, that there is no raised floor for the 2nd floor... does anyone know of more examples of the kind of ducts in the Madrid airport, and what the proper term for them is called?  This will be useful in terms of specifying parts and stuff. 

Thanks

gentle puppies
Jan 9, 13 2:34 pm

Bump... anyone know what the Madrid airport vents are called?

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