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Learning for the future

Nov 30 '12 2 Last Comment
werh5774
Nov 30, 12 8:37 am

I am interested to know if anyone has encountered programs that frame their content in terms future roles of architecture rather than in relationship to already-outdated current needs of the profession. For example by looking at how architecture will have to be in 25-35 years, when most of current students will be mid-career architects, and what one should learn now that can still be useful then.

Maybe along the lines of these?

http://www.archdaily.com/244251/practice-2-0-the-elephant-in-the-room/

http://www.archdaily.com/298112/frontier-learning-the-future-of-architectural-education-stanislav-roudavski/

 

accesskb
Nov 30, 12 5:30 pm

Similar to how one can't write books without first learning alphabets, or run without first learning how to walk, you need to master the 'outdated' and 'established rules' before you try breaking rules and thinking about future roles of architecture.  Or else, you'll just be running around in circles. 

One can only be told to a certain degree what is the future of architecture.  No one really knows for full certainty.  Its up to us in the profession to first learn the foundation, then try to innovate and break free from it.  Everything is subjective.  What works for an individual, group, society, period, will not necessarily work for everyone of them every time.

werh5774
Dec 2, 12 6:08 am

From these comments I deduce that you are yet to encounter a program that tackles these issues. I was asking for pointers to such programs, rather than for common sense observations at the times when common sense and old adages are far from enough. But to answer you anyway, it is important to try to look into the future. E.g. witness Arup's Foresight initiative http://www.driversofchange.com/ and a position of a futurist they have created http://futuryst.blogspot.com.au/. You choose to miss out at your peril. I am not sure what content is "learning to walk" in your mind but it is accepted in most quarters that architecture is in need of a dramatic change and that its professional education is lagging behind. Woudhuysen and Abley's "Why is Construction so Backward?" is one of many illustrations of why those who "learned to walk" in the past are presiding over such a mess.

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