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Feb 12 '06 52435 Last Comment
curtkram
Mar 6, 13 11:47 am

A kid from a broken home with money is going to have more opportunity than a kid from a broken home without money. Lack of money can have side effects like malnourishment or some sort of child labor thing that can reduce the kid's ability to get a decent education. There is also less hope when you're surrounded by poverty, which I think can be demotivating.

tint
Mar 6, 13 11:55 am

I wouldn't disagree with that, curt as I'm sure that you wouldn't disagree that a rich kid can have some significant fallout too and that it can go unnoticed because they are rich. I don't say this to be controversial or oppositional, I say it because... I work with rich kids from broken homes.

stone
Mar 6, 13 12:17 pm

... yeah, it's particularly troubling when a rich kid from a broken home is taught how to use an assault rifle by his Mom and then ... well, you know the rest of that story.
 

toasteroven
Mar 6, 13 12:34 pm

you know what really burns my britches?  homes that are literally broken.  you know - like tile coming off walls in the bathroom, missing roof shingles,  structural problems... such promise... ripped away by years of neglect (or maybe homeowner just couldn't afford it - who am I to judge?).  you try and try to help by making recommendations that might keep things together, but there's only so much we can do. 

 

all those broken homes... it's a shame.

Sarah Hamilton
Mar 6, 13 12:45 pm

I used to wonder how homes could get into such disrepair, and then the popcorn started peeling from my bathroom ceiling, and you know what....

I just clean up the pieces as they crash to the floor.  Scrap and repair it? Ha! Ain't nobody got time for that!

observant
Mar 6, 13 1:17 pm

Are you guys ever stunned at the general availability of marijuana in the world of regular grown ups? I always assumed high schools and colleges were just steeped in pot, as mine were.

Yep.  My HS and college were steeped in pot, and the HS was parochial.  Go figure.  I learned something.  You were cool and "in the know" if you had mere access to this stuff.  To this day, I couldn't tell you where to get pot.  I have TWO friends who would have it on hand, and offered it to me, which I declined.  However, as to not being "in the know," I knew back then that I was NOT cool (LOL) and that was ok with me.

snooker-doodle-dandy
Mar 6, 13 6:18 pm

If you really want to understand what education is about apply for a scholarship.

http://privateschool.about.com/od/schools/tp/topboardingschools.htm

vado retro
Mar 6, 13 7:28 pm

some drunk girl from groton did the groton hurl in my kitchen back in my boston daze.

will gallowaywill galloway
Mar 6, 13 7:39 pm

Def crappy that you need such training sarah.

I can't recall where it was on the USA but there was recent article saying teachers would not be allowed to teach critical thinking because it was causing children to question religious doctrine. Texas maybe. Definitely a republican idea, though it shouldn't be by rights. I wonder what happened to the drive for excellence that used to be an ideal worth having ... Did Amerika decide the price was too high cuz the sheep were getting restless? The new mantra seems to be to fcuk the poor and make it stick by keeping them dumb through governmental fiat. Canada ain't a heckuva lot different lately.

Where have all the flowers gone?

observant
Mar 6, 13 8:25 pm

Like someone said under "forgotten" M.Arch., there should be a thread on crazy things that happened in architectural school.  We could extend that to offices, too. 

However, here's a crazy situation that happened in neither - with the IDP adviser outside of your firm who countersigns your forms after your firm has signed them.  He was sort of the go-to IDP guy for the local chapter.  I told him that it had been another 4 months or so, and I had a form for him to sign.  He asked me "Why don't you meet me for lunch?"  I didn't think anything of it.  I thought he wanted to talk IDP ... and shop.  Well, he SORT OF wanted to talk shop.  It turned out he was doing "multi-level" and wanted me to get under his pyramid.  I told him that, beyond going to work, doing some travel, going to the gym, and my job as an evening adjunct teacher, I wasn't interested.  Not quite verbatim, he said something like 'oh, come on, this is a better opportunity than teaching at night.  Quit that.'  I had been using this guy for an adviser for over a year and I had to seek out a new one.

The stupidity of IDP advisers, outside of one's firm, could be a thread.

will gallowaywill galloway
Mar 6, 13 8:39 pm

go for it observiant.  no idea what you are talking about but sure you will be able to turn it into a shit storm of posts.

 

totally unrelated, saw in news that some offices in usa will maybe need to charge consumption tax on services, and it is apparently a shock.  I didn't deal with billing when working in north america but we have always had to include tax for our fees here in Japan.  Is that not the norm in the USA ?  sounds great if so.

observant
Mar 6, 13 8:46 pm

go for it observiant.  no idea what you are talking about but sure you will be able to turn it into a shit storm of posts.

School would be one.  Work would be another.  I'll let SOMEONE ELSE start them. 

With reference to the above and my IDP adviser, "multi level" is a pyramid scheme.  To spring that on an intern is unconscionable.  That's not what they are there for.  Hated having to change out an IDP adviser who was within 5 years of my age and I viewed as sort of a friend.

Sarah Hamilton
Mar 6, 13 9:29 pm

No, at least in Texas, you cannot charge tax on services.

will gallowaywill galloway
Mar 6, 13 10:41 pm

ah that is cool sarah.  it is something we are always fighting over cuz it adds up, with architecture.  very expensive. would love to not have to deal with it.

 

on unrelated note : RIP stompin tom connors

Donna SinkDonna Sink
Mar 6, 13 11:05 pm

The tax on architectural services proposal has happened in various states over the years.  I don't think any of the proposals have ever come to pass.

Jon Stewart taking a leave of absence for 12 weeks?!?  Who will I drink my nightly bourbon with?!?

mantaray
Mar 6, 13 11:22 pm

Consumption tax = sales tax?

Weird, never heard of sales tax on services.  Sounds like a bad idea.  We have enough regressive taxes; we need to increase our progressive taxes and move on.  The poor and middle class are already paying more than fair share and can't shoulder much more burden. 

Donna SinkDonna Sink
Mar 6, 13 11:23 pm

manta, been thinking of you lately as for the last two weeks at work I find it seriously difficult to find time to pee. Just for five minutes, just FIVE MINUTES I feel like I can't stop!!!

vado retro
Mar 7, 13 12:19 am

just wait until the pee tax goes into effect. the jindal wants to end income tax and increase sales tax. the sales tax here is almost 10 percent now and we aint even got a dog catcher. a pack of stray dogs has gotten into the zoo twice now and killed some goats and other animals that were on loan from another zoo. wtf???

Nam HendersonNam Henderson
Mar 7, 13 8:43 am

donna did you see that John Oliver will do 8 of the 12 weeks as guest host?

might be good...

b3tadine[sutures]
Mar 7, 13 11:53 pm

I'm hearing rumors that AECOM/Ellerbe Becket maybe closing up their Minneapolis office. They've been getting rid of their top heavy staff, Jon Buggy is gone, and rumored to have joined Gensler. Interesting.

curtkram
Mar 8, 13 10:26 am

so anyway, there is a blog about zaha at harvard.  i didn't want to interrupt their serious conversation of selling books or whatever is going on, but why is that guy wearing a scarf inside?  i believe he was referred to as a "moshen."  i know it's still sometimes cold this time of year, but shouldn't harvard be able to offer more reasonable climate control?  or do you suppose there is something more sinister going on, like he's trying to hide a hicky or something?

Miles JaffeMiles Jaffe
Mar 8, 13 11:44 am

Moshen (or sometimes slam dance or slamming) is in a hard rock -, punk - or metal concert in the pit wildly beat. A kernel is a group moshende or slamdancende (a weak form of moshen) people who join concerts usually directly to the stage. It is a kind of outlet for people to a hard rock concert. In the fierce and turbulent past of the punk and hardcore you sometimes had a head walk: as the name says it ran over the heads of the audience.

http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moshen

Donna SinkDonna Sink
Mar 8, 13 12:16 pm

I wear scarves inside frequently, both for warmth and style.

Can I complain for a moment about construction terminology?  I've heard the term "horizontal column" more in the last three weeks than ever in my life.  There is no such thing as a horizontal column. If it's vertical, it's a column; if it's horizontal, it's a beam.  Even if it's a wide flange that has the *shape* of a typical column, it's still a beam.

And now everyone's talking about the "metal work" going on. To me metal work is either decorative, or if we're using slang, it's ductwork.  Installing metal studs is"framing" or "stud work", whether they're metal or wood.

Jobsite confusion abounds when p[people don't use the right terms! Of course, all the contractors are currently over on Contractor-inect complaining about the dumb architect who doesn't even use proper terminology.  Sigh.

Sarah Hamilton
Mar 8, 13 12:44 pm

What if it's a fancy Corinthian column, being transported to a job site, on a flatbed truck?  Then could it be a horizontal column?

 

So I'm going to do something tonight that terrifies me.  I'm going to a Sikh temple/church, and I'm taking Abram with me.  Because it scares me so much, I have determined that I HAVE to go.

observant
Mar 8, 13 1:14 pm

Has anyone seen the TV news showing the shark migration up Florida toward NC where they are THICK in the waters off Florida?  I like to vacation in the Gulf/Panhandle, but use the hotel pool for swimming and the beach for the beach.

curtkram
Mar 8, 13 2:19 pm

maybe a horizontal water column?

i would agree with the sentiment that a column holds up a beam which holds up joists.

sarah, there is a fair chance the sikhs will be the nicest people you ever met.

Sarah Hamilton
Mar 8, 13 2:22 pm

I'm sure they will be.  It only terrifies me because it is something new and unknown.  

tint
Mar 8, 13 2:35 pm

How about a masonary column?

Sarah Hamilton
Mar 8, 13 2:40 pm

Is that a cross between masonry and missionary, cause then I'd think it'd have to be horizontal...

Josh MingsJosh Mings
Mar 8, 13 7:22 pm

I had 6 dirty jokes come to mind within 15 seconds of reading that. Apparently, at 30, I still have the mind of a 14 year old.

Rusty!
Mar 8, 13 8:26 pm

Architectural terminology is a daily frustration. I don't care if you call it "spicy bulgarian chicken" in your submittal, as long as it passes the industry standard tests (ASTMs and such) I can translate that to 'oh, you mean hanging rods'.

Lately NPR has been focusing on stories of long term unemployed architects finally getting jobs. And construction picking up. And all kinds of happy economy stories. I want to be really happy about this, but am too spiteful at the though that finance shits in my city are doing lines of coke off of multiples of asses at the same time again. 

I'm overworked and unhappy. 

Donna SinkDonna Sink
Mar 8, 13 10:55 pm

Hang in there, rusty, be it on a hanging rod aka spicy bulgarian chicken or just by your hands.

Sarah, yes.  I'd say a column being transported on a flatbed is safely called a horizontal column.  But it's not functioning in any way beyond existing, so it's…an adjective not a title? Anyway, very funny example.  And I m SO PROUD and in awe of you going to a Sikh temple and taking your child.  You are a really good mother.

observant
Mar 8, 13 11:05 pm

I had 6 dirty jokes come to mind within 15 seconds of reading that. Apparently, at 30, I still have the mind of a 14 year old.

I'd say a dirty joke thread is in order.  I'll leave that authorship up to someone else, but I might contribute.

will gallowaywill galloway
Mar 9, 13 1:40 am

Quite cool Sarah.  Not sure why it would scare you but glad you are working to broaden both yours and your son's horizons a wee bit.  Do let us know how it goes and if the fear was warranted...

Sarah Hamilton
Mar 9, 13 9:41 am

It went really well. Abe and I went in, took off our shoes, and had his bandana properly tied ( I lack the gangster gene). Then, we walked into the prayer room, IN FRONT OF ALL THESE PEOPLE, placed a dollar in the box, knelt, and placed our heads to the ground. It was terrifying. And then when Abram sat up, his head covering came off, and he panicked. I blushed, and we hurried out. It was some initiation.

Then we went to the dining hall, met people, and ate. Abe had pizza, but I wanted to try Indian food. I had a yogurt that they make themselves from milk, it was sour. Very sour. Then I had a dal that was like some sort of stew with green peas and hard squares of cheese. It was spicy, and different. I had to eat it with a spoon because I couldn't get it to work with the rotti (wheat tortilla). The sweet rice was ok, but took some getting used to, but the chai tea was amazing, the little round, sticky donut holes, for lack of an actual name, were good.

I talked to a few students, and they explained what was happening, and Abe just ran around with all the other kids.

After a few hours, the put their sacred book to bed, and a man walked around handing out a holy food. It was a mush that you eat with your hands. Tasted like a cross between peanut butter and oatmeal. Pretty good.

I'm glad I went. Everyone was very nice. There were lots of stares, and I felt out of place, but not uncomfortably so. The whole religion is about service to others, and being kind. I'd love to read their book, but its hard finding it in English. And the whole service was in Punjabi, so I have no idea what was said. Still, I'm glad I went. It was fascinating.

b3tadine[sutures]
Mar 9, 13 1:18 pm

sharks, florida, spring break; here's to good eating, and great times for all, especially those tiger sharks!! go get em!

observant
Mar 9, 13 1:33 pm

Ever had a GOOD shark steak?  It can be delicious.  I've had some shark that was way too dry.

b3tadine[sutures]
Mar 9, 13 3:18 pm

i'm rooting for the sharks in this scenario, as i loathe spring breakers. but, i would be interested in recipes for spring breaker meat, not for me of course, but for my cousin, Mose, and his family, on the beet farm.

observant
Mar 9, 13 3:23 pm

I loathe spring breakers, too, since they only used to go to a few spots and have now discovered others.  I just flew home to California for my own "spring break," so I didn't partake.  Relaxed with friends or went skiing, if there was still snow in the mountains, but avoided all the alcohol, drugs, and stupidity.  That said, some of the Spring Break places (Lauderdale, the Gulf, and South Padre) are fantastic in "shoulder season," when less crowded.

Nam HendersonNam Henderson
Mar 9, 13 3:48 pm

sarah sounds like you had lassi, mattar paneer and gulab jamuns.

I am off to Wisconsin tomorrow for work. should be first snow in a few years.

also go sharks!

Sarah Hamilton
Mar 9, 13 8:45 pm

Yes to the last two, but the yogurt wasn't a drink, and seemed spicy.

Sarah Hamilton
Mar 9, 13 8:48 pm

Oh, and I love shark. Yum!

Brian HenryBrian Henry
Mar 9, 13 9:52 pm

I just noticed it but, how long has there been the "Activity Stream" feature of the site? Anyone using it?

observant
Mar 9, 13 10:25 pm

Oh, and I love shark. Yum!

Where is most of the shark Americans eat fished?  Atlantic Florida, the Gulf, Hawai'i, Asia?

Nam HendersonNam Henderson
Mar 10, 13 10:00 am

Morning all,

Sarah maybe raita then?

Brian do you mean the "Work Updates" feed? it went live when 3.0 did...

vado retro
Mar 10, 13 10:39 am

most people survive shark attacks. the shark's initial bite is not much harder than a human's. they are tasting you to see if you are a seal. also, sharks cannot digest bones, so they really don't want to eat humans. it is mostly all a case of mistaken identity when they eat humans. a great white has a 600 psi bite while an alligator has around 3000 psi. chomp. chomp.

observant
Mar 10, 13 11:18 am

And most people bitten by an alligator die from the massive infusion of different strains of bacteria that a whole assortment of antibiotics can't control fast enough.

True about the great white.  They want a blubbery seal.  However, the most dangerous to humans is the smaller bull shark.  They are not happy with one bite.  The keep attacking.  They are the ones more likely to be found on Florida's Gulf side.

Brian HenryBrian Henry
Mar 10, 13 12:45 pm

Nam, nope. "Activity Stream" ... Look just below your username in the black sidebar.

Nam HendersonNam Henderson
Mar 10, 13 11:11 pm

huh, never noticed that...

Brian HenryBrian Henry
Mar 10, 13 11:16 pm

Looks like you can follow people that have profiles set up. Does it tell you who is following you or notify you when someone follows you?

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