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Feb 12 '06 52563 Last Comment
snooker-doodle-dandy
Mar 1, 13 10:39 am

I have had a Rag Doll Cat in another life.  Actually two of them....I guess I should say one was a half a rag doll cause mommy went to to play with a Big Tom.  So Moi was all black and didn't conform to the breed at all  in features except with the long hair, but she was a full rag doll when it came to personality.

curtkram
Mar 1, 13 10:45 am

i think toaster's animated gif should be on the archinect front page

Purpurina
Mar 1, 13 12:56 pm

That's exactly how he looked like after the event.

observant
Mar 1, 13 1:21 pm

And I love you guys, but I have a dark secret.  I hate cats.

We had a cat once.  An all-black one.  It grew up with boys, so we constantly played with her.  She developed a dog's personality and was very social with guests/people.

A cat with a dog's personality can work his or her way into a dog lover's heart.  You'd be surprised.

But, yeah, I'm a dog person all the way.

mantaray
Mar 2, 13 1:40 pm

I am a dog person that has never owned one; perhaps that's why I'm a dog person.

Last time I visited Lisbon I got to check out an aquaintance's firm, and he kindly showed me around the hood a bit.  Definitely made a difference to how I experienced Lisbon (made it even more one of my favorite cities).  I second the push to connect with architects abroad.  Also, every architect loves a new audience!  Most of us know a ton of the practicing architects in our own cities - it's such a small world - so it's great to connect when some fresh face comes a'visitin'.  Plus it gives them a chance to get out of the office and show off their town - another thing we all love to do. 

The commonalities between architects - no matter the country - astounds me.

observant
Mar 2, 13 2:24 pm

I am a dog person that has never owned one; perhaps that's why I'm a dog person.

Last time I visited Lisbon I got to check out an aquaintance's firm, and he kindly showed me around the hood a bit.  Definitely made a difference to how I experienced Lisbon (made it even more one of my favorite cities).  I second the push to connect with architects abroad.  Also, every architect loves a new audience!  Most of us know a ton of the practicing architects in our own cities - it's such a small world - so it's great to connect when some fresh face comes a'visitin'.  Plus it gives them a chance to get out of the office and show off their town - another thing we all love to do. 

The commonalities between architects - no matter the country - astounds me.

Fell in love with Lisbon as a child, when I was less than 5 feet tall, because I got to visit the city with my parents.  I have returned numerous times as an adult.

I will agree that it's interesting to interact with architects from other places.  There is a common mindset, and like they say "The only person who can (under)stand an architect is another architect."  And that's pushing it a bit, because there is no "can't we all get along?" among architects.  As far as work styles, I feel that American architects and foreign architects are different.  When I've spoken to European architects or architectural grads, there's a lot more posturing and pomp & circumstance.  It's interesting, even fun, but  it's different. Americans, to me, seem a lot more "get 'er done."

vado retro
Mar 2, 13 6:37 pm

Guess I'll see what I can whip up in my 21st century kitchen. Later.

will gallowaywill galloway
Mar 2, 13 7:50 pm

my 21st c kitchen is more awesomer.

@observant, don't take this the wrong way but you got the posturing and the pomp down cold.  You are European?

observant
Mar 2, 13 8:08 pm

@observant, don't take this the wrong way but you got the posturing and the pomp down cold.  You are European?

Passive aggressive much? (the bold)  Too funny. No, and yes, and no.

Pomp and posturing - maybe in written form - I've been told by profs to tone it down, but never for stuff like plan check letters or contractor correspondence - overall, no, this is my yang for what is my yin(g), that being an ability to hold a conversation with Eddie Murphy and Lisa Lampanelli, or facsimiles thereof.  My friends told me I talked just like that in (u.g.) school, but "cleaned up nicely" as the occasion dictated.  :-)

European?  Yes, my parents "came over."  Me?  No, born and raised in the big "melting pot" U.S. cities.

Sarah Hamilton
Mar 2, 13 9:07 pm

I'm starting to wonder how any boys survived past the age of five!!

observant
Mar 2, 13 9:09 pm

^  Why so?

toasteroven
Mar 2, 13 11:42 pm

sarah - I'm guessing you purposely designed in "dead cat spaces" in all your studio projects?  also - boys are nuts - they become a little more reasonable after 6.

will gallowaywill galloway
Mar 3, 13 8:52 am

Lol observant.

@Sarah, Boys are all candidates for the Darwin prize through most of their childhood. I have no idea how my brother and I survived. Growing up with electric fences and farm machinery sure did offer opportunity for acts of stupidity. We laugh about the stupid stuff that didn't kill us all these years later though. So I guess there was some redeeming value.

mantaray
Mar 3, 13 10:27 am

ha ha - dead cat spaces!  One of my fave arch school tropes.  Amazing how wide-spread that one is. (at least IN THE US, ha ha ha!)

I don't think I can quantify any generic differences between euro and american architects.  I've met some euro designers who definitely seem more ready to take risks - which I appreciate, as I find the US design climate usually too risk-averse and too dominated by a totally hypothetical "public" (as in "resale value" or "what the public wants") - but I've also met euros who seem chained to the past, or to what's conventional to build in that country.  Generally, they don't seem to have to detail CDs as much as we do, probably because of legal climate & contractor quality.  But as much as that can encourage more risk-taking it can also encourage inattentiveness.  To sum up: meh.  Personally I think architecture's mostly a mixed bag, wherever you go.

Although - to completely negate my last entire paragraph - I will say that the level of design quality woven right into the fabric of daily life in Portugal is insane.  The populace at large seems to actively understand and appreciate architecture.  Not that they all agree on style - far from it, I've read the rants online about new projects going up in historic towns, etc etc - but they seem to expect quality design, in a way that people in the US definitely do NOT.  (And I mean that in all sorts of things in life, not just architecture: their serving implements are beautiful, they dress attentively and nicely, they seem to have an eye for aesthetics everywhere.)  They talk about design, they know about it, and even the most random "background" building in Portugal seems to have some aesthetic nicety about it that shows that someone was thinking about it, crafting it.  I think their proportion of Pritzker winners to population size speaks volumes.  It really astounds me how every town I've been to in Portugal - even the remote, tiny ones - have just lovely planned spaces in them (both urban and architectural).  So, who knows.  Perhaps there is some kind of generality to be made here.

Sarah Hamilton
Mar 3, 13 2:01 pm

Actually, I was referring to boys being ALLOWED to survive. Abram is always going 90 miles an hour. Never still, and never listens. It's infuriating, embarrassing, and most of all exhausting.

Donna SinkDonna Sink
Mar 3, 13 9:41 pm

Sarah, I honestly don't know how much of that is just boys in general and how much is certain types of boys. Angus is constantly infuriating and embarrassing and exhausting. He's also incredibly smart and clever. I don't know if puberty is going to make it all much easier or much, much worse.

Tomorrow is going to be a rough day, some things going down at the job that will be difficult.  On another topic, apropos of the movie my husband is watching, Ewan McGregor is unbelievably appealing.

will gallowaywill galloway
Mar 4, 13 12:04 am

much worse donna.  then easier.

 

hah sarah. boys are a handful.  i have huge respect for my mum raising my bro and me on her own.  my kids are amazingly polite and calm compared to friend's male spawn. barely any hair pulling at all.

Donna SinkDonna Sink
Mar 4, 13 9:35 am

Well, I've survived the first round of layoffs at my job. No further comment than that at this point.

Nam HendersonNam Henderson
Mar 4, 13 10:18 am

morning all,

what exactly are dead cat spaces? @Donna, well i guess that's good news?....

Donna SinkDonna Sink
Mar 4, 13 10:40 am

It's probably good news short term. Long term, maybe not.

Dead cat spaces are those bits of unresolved space in your floor plan "where cats go to die".  Also called SLOIP in my school, for Space Left Over In Plan.  It happens a lot when a beginning student is trying to make everything very rectangular and exactly the required square footage but none of it quite clicks together gracefully.

curtkram
Mar 4, 13 10:54 am

congrats i think donna.  or congrats for now as the case may be.  i wish you the best of luck.  isn't this a fairly new position?

i've often wondered how evolution allowed puberty and preteens and such to happen.  that's probably not in your cards for a few years though sarah.

Sarah Hamilton
Mar 4, 13 1:21 pm

Saw this today.  Maybe it's just the music, but I think it's fun!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=L0TxbY2Bo20

observant
Mar 4, 13 1:40 pm

Will:

I'm guessing you're the first born of the two. The first born is the standard-bearer.  I'm of that same "kid constellation."  I'm a "classic" last born.

Donna SinkDonna Sink
Mar 4, 13 8:16 pm

OK so I'm officially not at work so I feel more comfortable posting about my job.  I could still lose my job over postings I make here or really anywhere on the web I suppose but that was one bit of self-employed freedom that I vowed not to give up when I became an employee and I even had agreed to in my job interview: I can post about professional topics on websites because it is part of how professionals practice and engage these days.  I agreed to use decorum and professionalism in my postings…which I usually do, but who can resist tossing out the occasional reference to Brad Pitt's abs when one is discussion CNC routing?

So the Museum laid off 21 people today, and 8 currently empty positions are not being filled.  We lost 11% of our workforce (this is all public knowledge from the press release). But I look around at my crew and we have *all* been busting our butts trying to keep up for the last 6 months, and now we've all - in all departments - lost good people who carried a lot of the load. It makes me think of all the Austerity stuff going on across Europe - how much load can a person take before they just give up? How long can I move two steps forward and one step back every. single. day. because I have so much work to do that I'm stretched thin and scattered and inefficient with no end in sight? I know that many, many architecture firms are facing this right now - they don't want to commit to hiring in an uncertain economy, so they're piling more work on fewer people and no one is getting a raise for taking on the work of another half-person or more. But how long can this last? Self-employment is looking just dreamy again to me…f*cking health insurance remains the biggest obstacle, but I've also discovered since working as an employee again that I really, really prefer working with people as part of a team rather than alone (but for the dog) in my home office.

Ugh.

gruen, I promised you a post on architecture so I will try to do that later tonight to help me get focused back on the good things again.

Donna SinkDonna Sink
Mar 4, 13 8:21 pm

PS thanks for listening TC <3<3<3<3<3 

Sarah Hamilton
Mar 4, 13 8:40 pm

Are those boobs in a cone?

Josh MingsJosh Mings
Mar 4, 13 8:41 pm

Good ol Indiana. Cuts to education and culture just to make Not My Man Mitch look good with a surplus. Damn shame too, the IMA has always been one of my favorites and I still visit every chance I get.

I'm terribly scared of what Mike Pence might do. I don't care if he is from my hometown, he should not be anywhere near the Gov. office; but when the only other choices were John Gregg and Rupert Boneham it is easy to see why he won.

This was yet another reason my return visit to the state was for the job search only.

Donna SinkDonna Sink
Mar 4, 13 8:56 pm

John Gregg gave him a decent challenge, at least. Pence is a dipwad, but he doesn't have anything directly to do with the IMA's situation. The thing with the IMA is it is definitely debatable whether we are in a poor financial situation or not.  Some similarly-sized institutions are doing better and some worse, but our current Board seems to want to take a very conservative track - not surprising for Hoosiers, eh? <sigh>.  The previous director (a genius among men, seriously) managed to piss off a bunch of donors, so the hope is that we can woo some of those people back with a new director (who has an excellent fundraising track record).  Personally I wish more time had been spent wooing before the ax fell on a bunch of really good people, but I guess that's why I'm not a director.

Sarah those are hearts!

vado retro
Mar 4, 13 9:13 pm

Mike Pence is the biggest fucktard on the planet and the fact that he was elected makes me wanna do a Hoosier Hurl!

observant
Mar 4, 13 9:25 pm

Self-employment is looking just dreamy again to me…f*cking health insurance remains the biggest obstacle, but I've also discovered since working as an employee again that I really, really prefer working with people as part of a team rather than alone (but for the dog) in my home office.

I sure as hell don't want this to digress into politics, but I think most architects understand that most practices are small, so I don't know a single architect who voted for Romney, who said he would be dismantling Obamacare on his first day on the job.  At least I hope not.  People don't understand Obamacare.  The people who are blatantly against it are the "I've got mine" crowd.  They think it's European or Canadian style health care.  It's not.  It's all about getting the 1 in 7 Americans who can't access health insurance into the market for it.  True, they may have to pay for it, partially or fully, if they have the means, but they can't be turned down.  Merely being prescribed any kind of sleeping medication or antidepressant leads to an almost automatic rejection in underwriting for the person buying solo.  I'm sure there are other triggers, too.  The reality is that no one over 40 has a perfect health record.  Yet, there are many people out there who work for themselves, or in small groups, and have benign levels of elevated blood pressure, cholesterol, or glycemia which will not require much in the way of medical care and meds until they are clearly past Medicare age.  On Jan 1, 2014 these shenanigans are supposed to end.

will gallowaywill galloway
Mar 4, 13 10:16 pm

good luck with job donna.  you imply further rounds of cutting in the future?  not good. 

really hope this sequester rubbish gets resolved too.  whether it is real or not can imagine it being used as cudgel to balance state budgets and also make america more dumber with less support for education and arts.  Because education is communist ( i guess? i really don't get the republican hangup with education) and art because its plum dangerous to encourage people to be thoughtful about life...  austerity ain't doing a hell of a lot of good for europe so far.  not sure why usa wants to go the same route. 

@observant. yup older brother.  younger brother is professional performer (very good one), also in japan.  we both ended up being travellers for one reason or another. both artists too, which is weird if you think about where we came from.  but anyway we were absolutely hell on wheels as kids.  boys are insane.  seriously. 

Steven WardSteven Ward
Mar 5, 13 9:00 am

i don't think republicans are against education, as long as it's run by private capital ventures, success is based on testing of math and reading/writing skills only, the curriculum is consistent with their religious beliefs, and teachers are free agents with no bargaining power or right to organize.

oh, and those students who can't succeed in the above model, can't be counted (aka the 'charter school' success story.)

vado retro
Mar 5, 13 11:04 am

there's plenty of money for edumacation here in louisianastan. plenty that is if you're fixin' to teach your chillins that jesus rode a dinosaur. 

Sarah Hamilton
Mar 5, 13 11:45 am

The argument that I have heard isn't so much against education, but against having to be responsible for educating others' kids.  It's this idea that my family is my responsibility, and your family is yours.  My education in my responsibility, and your education is yours.  I think this stems from the frustration of kids wasting the free education they were given.

snooker-doodle-dandy
Mar 5, 13 4:04 pm

Imagining Vado doing  the, " Hoosier Hurl Shake"

Josh MingsJosh Mings
Mar 5, 13 7:31 pm

Vado, had I stayed in New Orleans there was no way in hell my future children were going to public school. I heard way too much in the news about them.

will gallowaywill galloway
Mar 5, 13 8:01 pm

education is an investment it isn't free.  america used to know that.  if its wasted on some who gives a fcuk?  its the ones that end up inventing tang that its all about. 

where do the dinosaur wranglers hang out anyway?  there are a few of em running the country that need to be herded a wee bit.

vado retro
Mar 5, 13 8:12 pm

in louisianastan the legislators who are so gung ho about charter schools ie christian jesus rode a dinosaur schools, backtracked when some muslims decided they wanted a charter school. there is talk among my gf and some of her peers about starting an athiest humanist charter school.

observant
Mar 5, 13 8:21 pm

Will:

I would think the schools in Canada in rural areas without strife and in nice suburbs of big cities are probably safe places to send one's kids.  I would imagine a school in a part of Toronto with a lot of poor people and strained social fabric would not be.  Essentially, it's the same in the U.S.  The money is available for the good school districts, and those kids then get into the best universities.  The poor ones are so mired in unsolvable problems that one doesn't know where to start.  It takes a special kind of grit to pull oneself out of those situations. I think that most teachers who leave teaching probably taught in the rough districts.  It isn't the ones teaching in Newport Beach or Palm Springs.

vado retro
Mar 5, 13 8:32 pm

rural areas are full of poor people and meth labs.

observant
Mar 5, 13 8:36 pm

rural areas are full of poor people and meth labs

Yes, they say many small towns in the Ozarks are hell holes full of meth labs that L.E. people sometimes inadvertently stumble into.  And, boy, are they surprised.  Then, there are some poor towns that still have a Bible Belt mentality.

Still, I wonder if part of teacher training is to look for "meth mouth."

vado retro
Mar 5, 13 8:53 pm

quit doing this. it is annoying.

 

Thank you.

vado retro
Mar 5, 13 8:55 pm

Meth labs aren't just the thing of Winter's Bone. I'm talking about rural New York, Vermont, Maine, Indianastan, Illinois, California. Poor people live in the country.

will gallowaywill galloway
Mar 6, 13 1:18 am

Lots of drugs in rural Canada too.

Not sure if you had a point there observant. If you are guessing at what it was like as a kid growing up in backhand of nowhere Canada in the 70!s and 80's it was simpler than now but also a lot poorer. First generation off the farm meant going into a trade in those days and art was for the fay. It's a different world now. Better and worse. More surreal now I would say. Jane Fonda in Vietnam made sense. Now we have rodman in N Korea watching hoops. And it's like a publicity stunt not ideology. Crazy that nobody really does moren shrug about that. I blame it on the dinosaur hunters.

Donna SinkDonna Sink
Mar 6, 13 6:51 am

Are you guys ever stunned at the general availability of marijuana in the world of regular grown ups? I always assumed high schools and colleges were just steeped in pot, as mine were, but isn't it time we acknowledge that pot is already almost as available and common as booze and just get on with taxing and regulating it? Jeez.

curtkram
Mar 6, 13 7:29 am

the state legislature in kansas proposed a law that says, for equal time, teachers would be required to teach scientific evidence supporting the proposition that global warming is not a thing that is happening.  the dinosaur thing is over.  we're attacking the epa in schools now, because those people are really hurting the oil companies. i mean sure, record profits are nice if you're into that sort of thing, but without the environmental regulation and people complaining about poisoning groundwater and such, they could set the bar a lot higher.

i think the architecture of a meth lab would be a good studio project.  those folks really could use deflagration venting and a fire suppression system.

tint
Mar 6, 13 7:38 am

Medical marijuana places are already more abundant than even coffee shops. Now they are going to have recreational marijuana dens. They are working out the legalities now, should see them next fall. My biggest concern is tourists getting high then trying to drive in the mountains... Traffic is already terrible.

Sarah Hamilton
Mar 6, 13 10:04 am

Meth-Mouth is definitely not part of teacher training in Texas, anyway.  We are taught to look for signs of homelessness, though.  And it's fairly apparent when a kid is poor, or has a rough home life, and I am in the suburbs.

Donna SinkDonna Sink
Mar 6, 13 10:35 am

Oh god Sarah that post depresses me so much.

tint
Mar 6, 13 11:34 am

Depressing too, in its own way, is that often kids from rich families ALSO come from broken homes and suffer from it. But we are taught to think that that doesn't happen and it goes unnoticed.

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