Archinect - lunch 2014-11-27T04:32:55-05:00 http://archinect.com/blog/article/112401418/lunch-10-call-for-submissions lunch 10 Call for Submissions uvalunch 2014-10-29T09:24:56-04:00 >2014-11-05T17:01:06-05:00 <p><img title="" alt="" src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/30/30s18itgkq7rjpox.jpg"></p><p>When we cross frontiers, what do we meet? Modes of visual, verbal and data communication have brought forth feelings of both awareness and disunity. Across scales, aliens emerge from this discord.</p><p>The issue is not only of the alien or non&shy;alien but of negotiated territory where the value of invasive species, hazardous materials and estranged forms comes into question. The enculturation of mobility, tourism, and surveillance is shifting self-perceptions and uprooting grounded relationships. What was once permanent can no longer be taken for granted.</p><p>As expanses shrink and technology enables, what aliens do we encounter and what are the rules of engagement? How do aliens operate within design? How are they agents of evocation, protocol, and myth? How are architects alien? What boundaries do we trespass?</p><p>ALIEN asks you to consider limits, permeations, the unfamiliar and the strange. Send us your declarations, pleas and confessions. We&rsquo;re looking for tested stories, ponderings, theories, m...</p> http://archinect.com/blog/article/84287969/lunch9-in-excess-call-for-submissions lunch9: In Excess (Call for Submissions) uvalunch 2013-10-16T11:59:43-04:00 >2013-10-21T18:26:25-04:00 <p> <img alt="" src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/oe/oen248mk089jrtau.jpg" title=""></p> <p> October 9, 2013:</p> <p> lunch invites you to submit your positions to be published in our ninth volume,<br><strong>lunch9: In Excess</strong></p> <p> <em>Excess is everywhere &mdash; it is plenty; profit; waste. Growth cannot occur without excess, yet there is a threshold beyond which growth becomes malignant. Nothing succeeds like excess, yet necessity &mdash; scarcity &mdash; is the mother of invention. We encounter this duality constantly; how we react defines us collectively as a society and individually as creators and agents of change.</em></p> <p> <em>How do we measure, or decide, what is &mdash; in quantity or quality &mdash; excessive? Are traditional constraints &mdash; the actualities of material, labor, technology, and permanence &mdash; still at work? Is excess valuable; is it beautiful; is it productive? When and how does excess lead to innovation, or stifle it?</em></p> <p> <em>What is design in excess?</em></p> <p> We seek ideas, papers, and projects &mdash; design and product proposals; visual narratives, critical mappings, and diagrams; experiments, interviews, critiques, etc. &mdash;&nbsp; ad...</p> http://archinect.com/blog/article/84287968/lunch8-futures-for-sites-unknown lunch8: Futures For Sites Unknown uvalunch 2013-10-16T11:57:03-04:00 >2013-10-21T18:00:50-04:00 <p> <strong>lunch8: Futures For Sites Unknown</strong> [Available for sale NOW on <a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/0989445305/ref=cm_sw_su_dp" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Amazon</a>]</p> <p> <img alt="" src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/9a/9aost611emhpjlh2.jpg" title=""></p> <p> The seventh volume of Lunch took a large step in engaging the design field outside the walls of the School of Architecture at the University of Virginia. It included a series of conversations with practitioners who visited the school, including Eduardo Arroyo, Levi Bryant, Teresa Gali, Rafael Moneo, and Camilo Restrepo. The effort to foster an evolving dialogue with the profession at large has been expanded in Lunch 8: Futures for Sites Unknown by breaking from tradition: no longer does Lunch only include articles submitted from the UVA community. A call for submissions was made, and the answer came from across the world.</p> <p> Lunch 8: Futures for Sites Unknown tackles the uncharted waters and unsteady ground facing designers. Boundaries are being redrawn due to rising sea levels. The large modern infrastructural projects of the mid-twentieth century are now our antiquity and new technologies respond to craft, ...</p>