Archinect - News 2014-12-20T19:32:21-05:00 http://archinect.com/news/article/116360308/berkeley-researchers-solve-the-mystery-of-the-ultra-strong-and-durable-ancient-roman-concrete Berkeley researchers solve the mystery of the ultra-strong and durable ancient Roman concrete Archinect 2014-12-19T18:10:00-05:00 >2014-12-20T16:52:17-05:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/ha/ha84t3ys87i9u39s.jpg" width="514" height="414" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The mortar resists microcracking through in situ crystallization of platy str&auml;tlingite, a durable calcium-alumino-silicate mineral that reinforces interfacial zones and the cementitious matrix. The dense intergrowths of the platy crystals obstruct crack propagation and preserve cohesion at the micron scale, which in turn enables the concrete to maintain its chemical resilience and structural integrity in a seismically active environment at the millennial scale.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/loose.dtd"> <html><head><meta></head></html> http://archinect.com/news/article/116032713/architectural-historian-discovers-chartres-cathedral-has-started-faking-it Architectural historian discovers Chartres Cathedral has started faking it Archinect 2014-12-15T12:05:00-05:00 >2014-12-16T12:40:41-05:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/vi/vicscbqog5rvkand.jpg" width="450" height="600" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The first portion she pointed out was a pale ochre wall patterned with thin, perpendicular white lines mimicking mortar between masonry blocks. Looking upward we then saw panels of blue faux marbre, high above them gilded column capitals and bosses (the ornamental knobs where vault ribs intersect), and, nearby, floor-to-ceiling piers covered in glossy yellow trompe l&rsquo;oeil marbling, like some funeral parlor in Little Italy.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/loose.dtd"> <html><head><meta></head></html> http://archinect.com/news/article/112415885/how-andrew-carnegie-built-the-architecture-of-american-literacy How Andrew Carnegie Built the Architecture of American Literacy Archinect 2014-10-29T13:48:00-04:00 >2014-10-30T18:56:08-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/9f/9fee2ff54a096071528bf7cccfc49e56.jpg" width="514" height="300" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Between 1893 and 1919&mdash; 3-decade run referred to as the Golden Age of the American public library system&mdash;Carnegie paid to build 1,689 libraries in the U.S. These seeded the DNA for nearly every American library built before the end of World War II. That may explain in part why there is no central accounting for Carnegie's libraries, which were built without any oversight from a formal program or foundation: Even libraries that aren't historical Carnegie libraries share their aesthetic philosophy.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/loose.dtd"> <html><head><meta></head></html> http://archinect.com/news/article/100055321/rare-film-of-le-corbusier-in-his-paris-home-and-studio Rare film of Le Corbusier in his Paris home and studio Archinect 2014-05-19T14:01:00-04:00 >2014-05-20T12:23:13-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/ys/yso6ran3hmldvvff.jpg" width="514" height="376" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>I am young man of 71 years old. I am a visual man. A man working working with eyes and hands.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/loose.dtd"> <html><head><meta></head></html> http://archinect.com/news/article/99659979/when-does-the-architecture-begin When does the architecture begin? Archinect 2014-05-12T17:57:00-04:00 >2014-05-20T20:02:50-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/t4/t4pm2b6pae7tqb7y.jpg" width="514" height="288" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>MIT Prof. Mark Jarzombek on the notion of primitive, the worldwide evolution of the housing, and the fate of the native populations in the modern environment When does the architecture begin? How the pit house can explain the global migrations and links between the Navahos and first men in Europe? MIT Professor of the History and Theory of Architecture Mark Jarzombek clarifies the essence of the problem.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/loose.dtd"> <html><head><meta></head></html> http://archinect.com/news/article/99255788/norman-foster-daniel-libeskind-guy-nordenson-to-speak-at-innovators-talk-series-at-the-mcny Norman Foster, Daniel Libeskind, Guy Nordenson to speak at Innovators talk series at the MCNY Justine Testado 2014-05-05T17:44:00-04:00 >2014-05-05T17:44:33-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/6n/6nwwhfjyoi2x3ge9.jpg" width="514" height="252" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Mark your calendars! Some popular architects will be speaking in the upcoming "Innovators" talk series at the Museum of the City of New York, starting tomorrow May 6 at 6:30 p.m... Accompanying the current "Palaces for the People" exhibition, each talk will explore the influence of the Guastavino Company, led by a Catalan father-son team whose architecture, construction, and design practices helped shape NYC's built landscape.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Below is the panelist line-up:</p><p><strong>May 6</strong> - <strong>Innovators: Building Design and Construction</strong>: Guy Nordensen (Guy Nordenson Associates); Valentine Lehr (Lehr Consultants International); Jill Lerner and Marianne Kwok (Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates); and Corie Sharples (Shop Architects)</p><p><strong>May 14 </strong>- <strong>Innovators with Norman Foster: From Guastavino to the Moon</strong>: Lord Norman Foster and his engineering partner Roger Ridsdill Smith</p><p><strong>July 7</strong> - <strong>Innovators: The Uses of Tiles Today</strong>: Suzanne Stephens (writer, critic, and deputy editor of Architectural Record) as moderator; Daniel Libeskind (Studio Daniel Libeskind), Ingeborg Rocker (Harvard University GSD, Rocker-Lange Architects); and Matthew Karlin (president of Nemo Tile Company).</p><p>Find more details about the series on <a href="http://www.bustler.net/index.php/article/norman_foster_daniel_libeskind_guy_nordenson_to_speak_at_innovators_talk_se/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Bustler</a>.</p><p><strong>Related: </strong><a href="http://archinect.com/news/article/96481965/first-major-guastavino-exhibition-opening-at-mcny-on-march-26" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">First major Guastavino exhibition opening at MCNY on March 26</a></p> http://archinect.com/news/article/85760430/winners-of-the-discovering-architecture-book-giveaway Winners of the "Discovering Architecture" book giveaway! Justine Testado 2013-11-04T14:36:00-05:00 >2013-11-04T14:55:23-05:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/wk/wk99xc6ovjscu5pi.jpg" width="514" height="679" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p> To start off the new week, let's announce the winners of the <a href="http://archinect.com/news/article/83600893/win-a-copy-of-discovering-architecture-how-the-world-s-greatest-buildings-were-designed-and-built-by-philip-jodidio" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Discovering Architecture book giveaway</a> we had from October.</p> <p> The winners below will each receive a hardcover copy of "Discovering Architecture: How the World's Greatest Buildings Were Designed and Built" by Philip Jodidio. Released last month by Universe Publishing, each book has 260 pages of stunning photographs, colorful illustrations, diecut overlays, and a collection of essays on each historic building's construction and the social, political, geographical, and cultural contexts of their architects.</p> <p> 1. <strong>Diego</strong> - Chicago, IL, USA<br> 2. <strong>Hannah&nbsp;</strong> - Diamond Bar, CA, USA<br> 3. <strong>Maria</strong> - Austin, TX, USA</p> <p> Congrats to the lucky Archinectors and a big thank you to everyone who participated!</p> <p> For more info and other titles from Rizzoli USA, click <a href="http://www.rizzoliusa.com/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">here</a>.</p> <p> Keep your eyes peeled for the next Archinect giveaway.</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/85448700/50th-anniversary-of-nyc-penn-station-demolition-to-be-honored-by-staged-reading-and-panel-highlighting-the-debate-on-historic-preservation 50th anniversary of NYC Penn Station demolition to be honored by staged reading and panel highlighting the debate on historic preservation Justine Testado 2013-10-31T14:49:00-04:00 >2013-11-01T18:39:23-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/uj/uj5m5jzx1o8bwd3m.jpg" width="514" height="347" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The Eternal Space will visually recreate the marvel of the former Pennsylvania Station using the actual photographs that documented the station&rsquo;s demise. [...] Using the latest in projection technology these arresting photographs will speak to the tragic demolition of an American architectural masterpiece [...] On the 50th anniversary of that great loss, The Eternal Space will pay tribute to the station and the gifted photographers who worked to immortalize it.</p></em><br /><br /><p> Architects, historians, and all urban enthusiasts are invited to a free evening event that will acknowledge the <a href="http://www.bustler.net/index.php/event/lights_camera_demolition_nycs_penn_station_recalled_on_stage_in_pictures/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">50th anniversary of the demolition of NYC's Pennsylvania Station</a> on Nov. 6 at the AIA | NY Center for Architecture. Hosted by <a href="http://cfa.aiany.org/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">AIA | NY</a>, the program will begin with a live reading of selected scenes from <a href="http://theeternalspaceplay.com" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><em>The Eternal Space</em></a>, a two-man stage play set during the Penn Station's demolition, which began on Oct. 28, 1963.</p> <p> <img alt="" src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/v2/v2bosdin5syvf30z.jpg" title=""></p> <p> The play presents a dialogue on the value of old vs. new, past vs. present, and all the timeless arguments that come with them that last to this day. The Eternal Space also points out the ongoing yet overlooked debate on the preservation of historic structures in New York and throughout the U.S. Never-published photography of the demolition from some of the subject's most notable photographers will provide the scenic backdrop for the staged reading.</p> <p> <img alt="" src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/64/64pxmxnjsp514b3i.jpg" title=""></p> <p> The reading will be followed by&#8203; a panel discussion &mdash; moderated by <a href="http://ny.curbed.com/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Curbed NY</a> Senior Editor Hana Alberts ...</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/83600893/win-a-copy-of-discovering-architecture-how-the-world-s-greatest-buildings-were-designed-and-built-by-philip-jodidio Win a copy of "Discovering Architecture: How the World's Greatest Buildings Were Designed and Built" by Philip Jodidio Justine Testado 2013-10-09T11:06:00-04:00 >2013-10-09T11:06:48-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/88/8859w5na6xyjei6g.jpg" width="514" height="679" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p> Want to brush up on some architectural history or need an entertaining coffee-table book?&nbsp; "Discovering Architecture: How the World's Greatest Buildings Were Designed and Built" released today by Universe Publishing could be just what you need--and we're giving away three copies to three lucky Archinectors!<br><br><img alt="" src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/5i/5iljmk5mcstlky0p.jpg" title=""><br><br> "Discovering Architecture" by Editor in Chief Philip Jodidio of French art monthly, <em>Connaissance des Arts</em>, looks deep into the histories of 50 of the world's most famous buildings over the past two millenia and the architects who designed them.<br><br><img alt="" src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/z5/z5dkmq4exuwxdcma.jpg" title=""><br><br> With 260 pages, this hardcover book offers plenty to explore: stunning photography, colorful illustrations and floorplans; die-cut overlays that focus on specific design elements; and accompanying essays on each building's construction and the social, political, geographical, and cultural contexts of their architects.<br><br><img alt="" src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/vc/vcqxuyaso0ltrmya.jpg" title=""><br><br> Starting today, simply answer this survey by <a href="https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?usp=drive_web&amp;formkey=dHJadmRVNmZvRWxWcEZNcGZ6dlBWUFE6MA#gid=0" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">clicking here</a> for a chance to win a copy. Winners will be selected at ran...</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/82526606/the-digital-future-of-architectural-history The Digital Future of Architectural History Places Journal 2013-09-23T15:34:00-04:00 >2013-09-23T15:34:18-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/wt/wtvcqebufck1p5dq.jpg" width="514" height="402" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>In creating associated descriptive metadata, in tagging building entries to describe their materials, types, and, perhaps most especially, their styles, the author of metadata is practicing the historian&rsquo;s craft and engaging in the historian&rsquo;s stock in trade. "Name it, then we&rsquo;ll know what it is," Reyner Banham suggested at the end of &ldquo;The Great Gizmo.&rdquo; We can name it metadata creation, but we already know what it is: architectural history.</p></em><br /><br /><p> For several years Gabrielle Esperdy has been part of a team working on the development of SAH Archipedia &mdash; an online encyclopedia of American architecture sponsored by the Society of Architectural Historians. Here she explores the critical challenge of creating structural and descriptive metadata for the new resource &mdash; and argues that the digital platform has the potential "not only to publish scholarship but to produce it."</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/76646781/big-trouble-for-little-chinatown-house Big Trouble For Little Chinatown House Christopher Sison 2013-07-09T13:08:00-04:00 >2013-07-15T18:38:14-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/33/33ypdnlurpy9uqcl.jpg" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>"It was a place where you got your information, and served as a post office -- it had an integral role in the community," Moy said of the building, as well as other similar sites. "It's a unique structure, even though architecturally it's very utilitarian and doesn't represent any high style of architecture. It's more about the people and the work they did."</p></em><br /><br /><p> The National Trust for Historic Preservation released its list of the 11 most endangered buildings in the country and making that list is Southern California&rsquo;s very own Rancho Cucamonga Chinatown House. No, the Chinatown House is not a restaurant at Victoria Gardens Shopping Center. Yes, Chinese immigrants made it to Rancho Cucamonga long before Ice Cube and cousin Day-Day ever did. Unbeknownst to most local residents, Rancho Cucamonga once housed a significant Chinese immigrant population that was vital to developing the agricultural economy of the Cucamonga Valley. However, in a similar fashion to other, small Chinatowns across California, this community eventually faded into obscurity. The Chinatown House is the last remnant of the role Chinese Americans played in the development of Rancho Cucamonga and much of the Inland Empire.</p> <p> Located on the Southwest corner of San Bernardino Road and Klusman Ave, from 1919 to 1940 this two-story brick building housed Chinese Americans wor...</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/74514211/unforgetting-women-architects Unforgetting Women Architects Places Journal 2013-06-03T17:15:00-04:00 >2013-06-10T11:15:04-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/mh/mhrw3so8cicvochq.jpg" width="514" height="665" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>A historian might spend decades undertaking research in archives and writing up discoveries in scholarly journals, but if the work does not have a presence online &mdash; and, specifically, a presence that is not behind a paywall &mdash; it is all but invisible outside academia. As Ridge states, &ldquo;If it&rsquo;s not Googleable, it doesn&rsquo;t exist.&rdquo;</p></em><br /><br /><p> Over the decades women architects have received scant attention from historians and prize juries. On Places, Despina Stratigakos writes, "The painful cancellation of Denise Scott Brown in the awarding of the Pritzker Prize solely to her husband and collaborator, Robert Venturi, is an important but hardly exceptional example of how female partners are written out of history by a profession suffering from Star Architect Disorder, or SAD." Stratigakos argues that it's time to write women back into history &mdash; and that the place to start is Wikipedia.</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/71902300/architecture-with-capital-letter-a Architecture with capital letter A Archinect 2013-04-24T18:38:00-04:00 >2013-04-29T18:17:22-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/4o/4ok6n8vv11c1uecf.jpg" width="514" height="363" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Architecture with capital letter A is a short movie, featuring Architects who might have shaped the concept of Architecture itself in the last decade. The movie combines excerpts of their interviews, speeches or documentaries over the last 70 years. This accumulation of scenes expresses somehow the condition of Architecture today - its moments of Glory and Misery.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/loose.dtd"> <html><head><meta></head></html> http://archinect.com/news/article/69679281/steve-jobs-architect Steve Jobs, Architect? Places Journal 2013-03-18T19:24:00-04:00 >2013-03-19T18:19:00-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/wu/wu6hu5ak9ppta5gj.jpg" width="514" height="379" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Yet another treatise on Steve Jobs? As an &ldquo;architect&rdquo; &mdash; really? And with Apple seemingly waning, aren't we behind the curve on this? Suffice it to say that my interest is not solely in Jobs himself, but rather in the challenge he poses to the methods and purpose of an architectural historian.... But since architectural stories are surprising rare here on the edge of the continent, I need a shtick; no matter my connoisseur-ish personal tastes and leftist political dispositions.</p></em><br /><br /><p> What is revealed when we contemplate the late Steve Jobs not only as a technologist extraordinaire but also as a sort of architect? And if we then compare Jobs with another complicated virtuoso, Rem Koolhaas? On Places, architectural historian Simon Sadler argues "Jobs and Koolhaas both seem to have been driven by the possibility that they can act inside, or around, a postmodern world resistant to purpose. Both share an attraction toward design as a type of hermeneutics &mdash; a will to learn about the world through the attempt to change it."</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/68553691/the-dead-architects-society The Dead Architects Society Archinect 2013-03-01T09:17:00-05:00 >2013-03-04T21:10:43-05:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/85/853fb78d308f17951ee29a8b6c82a470.jpg" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>In Santa Barbara, Calif., the hot architect in town is George Washington Smith. In Charlottesville, Va., it's Eugene Bradbury. And in the small town of Washington, Conn., homes by Ehrick Rossiter are prized. These architects have a few things in common: They're long dead, they're relatively unknown outside the small, affluent pockets where they practiced in the early 20th century and they've all made a comeback.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/loose.dtd"> <html><head><meta></head></html> http://archinect.com/news/article/67510419/the-emergence-of-container-urbanism The Emergence of Container Urbanism Places Journal 2013-02-13T14:33:00-05:00 >2013-02-18T18:09:09-05:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/l7/l7dsed1e1yot2o9o.jpg" width="514" height="354" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>In its most far-reaching aspects, container urbanism proposes to take the fundamental organic/architectural condition of containment further by exploring how a boundary might be better coordinated, even merged with the flow of material/ideas. Can containment equate more closely with transmission and, in so doing, position architecture and urbanism more in line with societal mobility and change?</p></em><br /><br /><p> The repurposed shipping container has become a fixture of urban architecture &mdash; part of a movement, as Mitchell Schwarzer argues, toward an "urban design as flexible, responsive and electric as the currents that feed it."</p> <p> On Places, Schwarzer examines the rise of container urbanism from the mid 20th century to now, from Archigram and the Metabolists in the '60s to the pop-up markets and modular housing of today; and he sees in this latest phase a "landmark change" for architecture.&nbsp;</p> <p> "By facilitating an almost instant building complex," he writes, "the containers put architectural production more in sync with the speed and transitoriness of contemporary life, forcing it to respond to a city&rsquo;s many complex, adaptive systems."</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/64541820/ancient-arts-center-discovered-under-rome-s-piazza-venezia Ancient Arts Center Discovered Under Rome's Piazza Venezia Archinect 2012-12-31T12:22:00-05:00 >2013-01-01T19:57:52-05:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/z5/z55zwtj4ctzuhx0r.jpg" width="514" height="386" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Eighteen feet below one of Rome&rsquo;s most-trafficked junctions is a 900-seat arts center dating back to the second-century reign of Emperor Hadrian, Italian archaeologists have announced. The discovery, widely seen as the most important in Rome in 80 years, came as a result of digging for the city&rsquo;s third subway line. Archeologists spent the last five years excavating two halls of the structure under the Piazza Venezia, which is believed to be an arts center, or auditorium, built by Hadrian.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/loose.dtd"> <html><head><meta></head></html> http://archinect.com/news/article/59845434/the-demolition-and-afterlife-of-baltimore-memorial-stadium The Demolition and Afterlife of Baltimore Memorial Stadium Places Journal 2012-10-22T18:32:00-04:00 >2012-10-23T00:12:41-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/nv/nv6cjrpr1blhoaqi.jpg" width="514" height="416" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>We tend to think of architecture as solid, stable, enduring, something that at its best will outlast us and possibly say something about us to future generations. Demolition makes powerfully evident the vulnerability, the mortality, of all things standing.</p></em><br /><br /><p> "When does architecture, once started, stop?" asks Keith Eggener. "Does it end when human occupation or attention terminates, when function or fabric are removed?" What is the connection between civic buildings and collective memory? Just in time for the World Series, Eggener recounts the saga of Baltimore Memorial Stadium, describing its powerful presence&nbsp; in the city during the decades when it was home to the Orioles &mdash; and its afterlife in the years since its demolition.</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/48450742/the-uses-of-daylight The Uses of Daylight Places Journal 2012-05-14T15:45:00-04:00 >2012-05-20T23:36:28-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/1y/1yv4wdwcc3s52pbr.jpg" width="514" height="342" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>For retailers, daylight offered one additional advantage the advertisements did not mention: the implication of moral virtue. Large department stores were described as cesspools of fraud, filth, poor working conditions, child labor, anti-competitiveness, potential press censorship (because of their advertising clout), disease, drunkenness, savagery, prostitution, suicide and darkness. A well-lit interior, it was said, could do much to counter such negative associations.</p></em><br /><br /><p> Earlier this year on Places, Keith Eggener assessed the career of the now forgotten early 20th-century <a href="http://places.designobserver.com/feature/louis-curtiss-and-the-politics-of-architectural-reputation/29428/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Kansas City architect Louis Curtiss</a>, and argued that Curtiss's obscurity has less to do with intrinsic merit than with the politics of professional reputation. In a new article examining&nbsp;the Boley Building &mdash; a department store which featured one of the first glass curtain walls in America &mdash; he makes good on his claim that Curtiss's legacy deserves new attention.</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/41988483/reyner-banham-on-the-road Reyner Banham on the Road Places Journal 2012-03-19T16:44:00-04:00 >2012-03-19T19:15:31-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/3b/3bdfgnkl5zj94dsn.jpg" width="514" height="239" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>If you drove far enough, from Maine to Georgia, from the Midwest to Southern California, or simply from one end of Los Angeles to the other, you would start to notice that there were different ecologies, and that some were geographical and some were cultural, but that they intersected and collaged to form a vast, sprawling, layered network whose patterns were discernible only if you took the long view and just kept driving.</p></em><br /><br /><p> In an essay for Places, Gabrielle Esperdy (of <a href="http://www.esperdy.net/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">American Road Trip</a>) follows architectural critic Reyner Banham out of Los Angeles and out onto the open road, placing him in the tradition of European travelers, from de Tocqueville and Dickens to Alistair Cooke and Stephen Fry, whose observations tell us Americans "something important about ourselves."</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/38093779/housing-and-the-99 Housing and the 99% Places Journal 2012-02-14T21:07:00-05:00 >2014-06-30T16:01:09-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/jl/jly7fdjdgpbauvg2.jpg" width="514" height="442" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>How should the state pursue the goal of making decent housing affordable and accessible to all its citizens? How can we mobilize our collective resources in the service of social justice? In what other ways might we imagine living together? What is a house?</p></em><br /><br /><p> On Places, architectural historian Jonathan Massey puts Occupy Wall Street and the 99 Percenters into the historical context of housing in America. Walking us from the 1920s to the present day, he&nbsp;explores how governmental and banking policies have worked to promote the ideal of home ownership &mdash; and lately to endanger it.</p>