Archinect - News 2015-03-02T22:18:39-05:00 http://archinect.com/news/article/119347379/artist-charles-young-crafts-mini-paper-metropolis-on-the-daily Artist Charles Young crafts mini paper metropolis on the daily Justine Testado 2015-01-27T14:36:00-05:00 >2015-02-02T18:19:57-05:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/v3/v3w8sxrl58dtqwyr.jpg" width="514" height="514" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>No, these aren't props from an upcoming Wes Anderson film.&nbsp;These mini paper structures are all part of Paperholm, a daily project by&#8203; Scottish artist <a href="http://charlesyoung.tumblr.com" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Charles Young</a>&#8203;.&#8203; Constructed by hand with only watercolor paper, PVA glue, the occasional dressmaking pin, along with an eye for detail, Young is building his own cityscape, one intricate building at a time.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src="http://cdn.archinect.net/uploads/gd/gdj4vbjmpgp5zix1.gif"><img title="" alt="" src="http://cdn.archinect.net/uploads/uy/uy4k9diokck2k40i.gif"></p><p>Young started making small paper models while he was studying architecture at the University of Edinburgh. After completing his M.Arch degree last summer, he eventually began Paperholm as a motivational way to test and develop his creativity and model-making skills on a daily basis.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/ic/icf57c86n6s6fba1.jpg"><img title="" alt="" src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/qy/qy1x4nzw3y9k8ds0.jpg"><img title="" alt="" src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/8i/8ib77xfec0qxersr.jpg"></p><p>So far, he has built an array of treehouses, churches, carousels, cabins, towers, and other urban buildings. "I especially like making the structures with a lot of cut out detail even though these take quite a long time," Young wrote via email. "I quite often find myself coming back to tower structures but I try to keep the models varied to produce a mix ...</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/113571377/moma-s-uneven-growth-case-studies-conclude-with-exhibition-this-month MoMA's “Uneven Growth” case studies conclude with exhibition this month Justine Testado 2014-11-13T13:03:00-05:00 >2014-11-26T14:22:44-05:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/ns/nsuzdoq1ilt7iso4.jpg" width="514" height="257" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>MoMA began its "Uneven Growth: Tactical Urbanisms for Expanding Megacities" initiative last year aiming to advance international discussion on disproportionate urban development and its potential consequences. To address this issue, six interdisciplinary teams spent 14 months in workshops designing proposals that investigate new architectural possibilities for six metropolises. Each case study will be exhibited to the public at MoMA starting on November 22.</p></em><br /><br /><p>But the discussion doesn't end there. MoMA also created a user-generated <a href="http://uneven-growth.moma.org/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Tumblr</a> that collects examples of emerging modes of tactical urbanism taking place in the six cities.</p><p>Here's a glimpse:</p><p><strong>LAGOS</strong><br>By NL&Eacute; (Lagos, Nigeria and Amsterdam, Netherlands)<br>Zoohaus/Inteligencias Colectivas (Madrid, Spain)</p><p><img title="" alt="" src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/0o/0ons4nm5za66uq8d.jpg"></p><p><strong>HONG KONG</strong><br>By MAP Office (Hong Kong, China)<br>Network Architecture Lab (Columbia University, New York, U.S.)</p><p><img title="" alt="" src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/s7/s7and5psdjvpi2kc.jpg"></p><p><strong>ISTANBUL</strong><br>By Superpool (Istanbul, Turkey)<br>Atelier d&rsquo;Architecture Autog&eacute;r&eacute;e (Paris, France)</p><p><img title="" alt="" src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/m3/m37c1xfs7kyexzfw.jpg"></p><p><strong>MUMBAI</strong><br>By URBZ: user-generated cities (Mumbai, India)<br>Ensamble Studio/MIT-POPlab (Madrid, Spain and Cambridge, U.S.)</p><p><img title="" alt="" src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/18/18hxwgs39hw2eswn.jpg"></p><p><strong>RIO DE JANEIRO</strong><br>By RUA Arquitetos (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil)<br>MAS Urban Design at ETH (Zurich, Switzerland)</p><p><img title="" alt="" src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/jh/jhveryk6ljc91i7n.jpg"></p><p><strong>NEW YORK</strong><br>By SITU Studio (New York, U.S.)<br>Cohabitation Strategies (CohStra) (Rotterdam, Netherlands AND New York, U.S.)</p><p><img title="" alt="" src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/ll/ll9izqxg6cri2hqq.jpg"></p><p>For further details and images from each case study, head over to <a href="http://www.bustler.net/index.php/article/moma_concludes_uneven_growth_workshops_case_studies_to_be_exhibited_this_mo/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Bustler</a>.</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/80689668/architecture-publication-clog-releases-gorgeous-sci-fi-issue Architecture publication CLOG releases gorgeous "SCI-FI" issue Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2013-08-30T19:48:00-04:00 >2013-09-02T19:52:19-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/jw/jwwov81ndy9l5lf9.jpg" width="514" height="302" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Rod Serling, creator of the 1950s television series "The Twilight Zone", defined science fiction as "the improbable made possible." The same might be said for the practice of architecture. After all, architects by trade conceive of spaces, places, and worlds that do not (yet) exist. Furthermore, the ability to make the improbable possible is held in especially high regard today and is oftentimes what defines an architectural practice as &ldquo;innovative&rdquo; in the first place.</p></em><br /><br /><p> Contemporary architecture publication <a href="http://www.clog-online.com/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">CLOG</a> has released its seventh issue, <em>SCI-FI</em>. In the digital glow of the internet age, architectural discourse has become both bountiful and ephemeral, oftentimes muddling the lay of the land. In response, &ldquo;CLOG slows things down. Each issue explores, from multiple viewpoints and through a variety of means, a single subject particularly relevant to architecture now. Succinctly, on paper, away from the distractions and imperatives of the screen.&rdquo;<br> With its precise curation and focused content, CLOG&rsquo;s <em>SCI-FI</em> examines the mutually-affecting relationship between architecture and science fiction in a variety of ventures. <em>SCI-FI&nbsp;</em>honors this &ldquo;two-way artistic influence between architecture and science fiction&rdquo; while provoking readers to consider future architectural aesthetics and the aesthetics of futurism. Previous issues have showcased themes surrounding BIG, Apple, and Brutalism. <em>SCI-FI</em> features over forty contributors from the architecture world ...</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/6931895/q-a-architects-sketchbooks Q&A: Architects’ Sketchbooks Paul Petrunia 2011-05-19T19:31:28-04:00 >2011-05-20T12:48:06-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/56/5655e0fb00e64ab02c777c0a7c2077f1.jpg" width="514" height="384" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>To combat the relentless move toward electronic technologies, many schools are integrating such analog technologies as pencils, pens, water colors, pastels, in addition to teaching the manipulation of the latest computer software.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Metropolis Magazine's Susan S. Szenasy interviews Will Jones about his book "Architects' Sketchbooks".</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/6229230/winners-of-the-2011-metropolis-next-generation-design-competition Winners of the 2011 Metropolis Next Generation Design Competition Alexander Walter 2011-05-13T17:14:52-04:00 >2011-05-13T19:59:43-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/4e/4e405jpnrsrvkcv2.jpg" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>An ambitious zero-energy retrofit proposal for a downtown Los Angeles federal building has just won the first prize of the 8th Annual Next Generation Design Competition, presented by Metropolis magazine in partnership with the General Services Administration. The brief of the competition's 2011 edition asked architects and planners to design a Zero Environmental Footprint for this 1,172,746 sqft, eight-story, 1960s energy-guzzling federal building, considering any scale of intervention.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/loose.dtd"> <html><head><meta></head></html>