Archinect - News 2015-11-24T17:19:45-05:00 Editor's Picks #426 Nam Henderson 2015-08-10T09:55:00-04:00 >2015-08-11T17:12:12-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="303" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Julia Ingalls</a>&nbsp;reviewed "<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Work on Work</a>" the current exhibition at Los Angeles&rsquo; Architecture + Design Museum, co-organized by Gensler and UCLA&rsquo;s cityLAB.&nbsp;</p><p>Therein she writes "<em>This feeling of being at an un-airconditioned business conference is not helped by the next section of the exhibit, in which the banners stop talking about history and start getting real about Gensler and cityLAB's speculation on the future of the work environment...the privileged and oversimplified overtones of the exhibit, paired with its refusal to envision a more distinguished balance between productivity and (unstructured, unmonitored, human) downtime make it a bit chilling.</em>"</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Amelia Taylor-Hochberg</a>&nbsp;Editorial Manager for Archinect <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">dissects</a> the upcoming monographic LACMA (by way of the Pompidou) <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">&ldquo;Frank Gehry&rdquo;</a> exhibition, opening September 13.&nbsp;Responding to her question about critical distance given Gehry&rsquo;s involvement,&nbsp;<strong>midlander</strong> writes&nbsp;"<em>It's inherently difficult to create a critical exhibit on a living architect....</em></p> Art college professor suggests makeover for brutalist Boston City Hall Alexander Walter 2015-07-27T13:26:00-04:00 >2015-07-31T18:30:38-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="245" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Some architects consider the design a stunning example of the modern Brutalist style, but for many Bostonians it&rsquo;s the building they have long loved to hate. [...] why can&rsquo;t we make changes that are easily reversible, while simultaneously acting to protect and preserve the structure? Here&rsquo;s one simple, obvious and cost-effective solution: Sheath the building with a tinted glass curtain wall &mdash; but not to create another modernist glass box.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Related:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">How Boston City Hall was born</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Gerhard Kallmann, Brutalist Architect, Dies at 97</a></li></ul> Gerhard Kallmann, Brutalist Architect, Dies at 97 Archinect 2012-06-26T18:01:00-04:00 >2012-06-29T11:25:48-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="283" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Gerhard Kallmann, the architect who, with Michael McKinnell, designed Boston City Hall, a hulking, asymmetrical, Modernist building that has been widely acclaimed by architects for half a century though disparaged by many Bostonians, died on Tuesday in Boston. He was 97.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> Editor's Picks #250 Nam Henderson 2012-02-12T23:32:00-05:00 >2012-02-20T16:30:20-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="365" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Jeanne Gang and Greg Lindsay suggested some ways of Designing a Fix for Housing, beginning with rethinking our historic commitment to detached, single-family homes and segregated Euclidean zoning. Louis Arleo agreed that we need to redesign suburbia but argued "however suburbia will never be improved until architects embrace the idea of a developers business model."</p></em><br /><br /><p> <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Anthony Carfello</a>,&nbsp;analyzed Los Angeles media&rsquo;s failings in their role as "<em>the de facto voice</em>" of AEG&rsquo;s development plans for Farmers Field&nbsp;in <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Farmers Field: Bringing Football Back on a Need-to-Know Basis</a>.&nbsp;Carfello contended "<em>The existing biases, the assumptions in play, the prized status of CEQA exemption, the traffic, the legitimate fiscal drawbacks weighed against any foreseeable benefits (to the non-AEG public), and greater questions of diversity of primary uses in downtown&rsquo;s future buildings all beg for further dialogue.</em>"and then offered up <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">(323) Projects</a>&nbsp;as an alternative model of citizen discourse.</p> <p> In the latest addition to the <strong>CONTOURS</strong>: series <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Sherin Wing</a>&nbsp;touched on some of the ways various changes taking place in architecture firms with regards to compensation and valuatization, are a result of the "<em>realization that employees are people, not just &lsquo;workers&rsquo; or &lsquo;laborers&rsquo;.</em>"&nbsp;in <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">On Business and Bosses</a>.</p> <p> <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Gregory Walker</a> commented he would like Sherin to "<em>come on here and enga...</em></p> How Boston City Hall was born Archinect 2012-02-10T19:16:00-05:00 >2012-02-20T04:36:08-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="270" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Whatever else you might think about it, Boston City Hall is an improbable building. Call it a giant concrete harmonica or a bold architectural achievement, but to walk by this strange, asymmetrical structure in Government Center is to wonder how on earth it landed there.</p></em><br /><br /><p> Fifty years after a groundbreaking competition, two architects look back at the project that polarized the city &mdash; and gave it a new lease on life</p>