Archinect - News 2015-11-30T08:29:33-05:00 Pyongyang's inner Wes Anderson shines through in its architecture, then and now Justine Testado 2015-11-03T13:24:00-05:00 >2015-11-05T21:23:15-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="308" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>'Let us turn the whole country into a socialist fairyland,'...Throughout the city, you now encounter the recurring colour schemes of salmon and teal, or pink and baby blue...These new spaces look like they have been assembled from crisp, unreal planes of colour and exude an anaesthetising aesthetic, candy-coloured decoys that distract from a reality of mass poverty across the country.</p></em><br /><br /><p>More on Archinect:</p><p><a title="This Wes Anderson-designed bar is retro with a capital R" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">This Wes Anderson-designed bar is retro with a capital R</a></p><p><a title="Building Wes Anderson's &quot;Grand Budapest Hotel&quot; out of 50,000 Legos" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Building Wes Anderson's "Grand Budapest Hotel" out of 50,000 Legos</a></p><p><a title='Christopher Hawthorne reflects on the spatial design in "Citizenfour" and other Oscar nominees' href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Christopher Hawthorne reflects on the spatial design in "Citizenfour" and other Oscar nominees</a></p><p><a title="Artist Charles Young crafts mini paper metropolis on the daily" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Artist Charles Young crafts mini paper metropolis on the daily</a></p> Pyonghattan & water parks: North Korea's new architectural ambitions Alexander Walter 2015-09-14T13:35:00-04:00 >2015-09-14T18:25:49-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="308" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>&ldquo;Let us usher in a great golden age of construction,&rdquo; exhorts one of the 310 official patriotic slogans published this year. The ambition is already evident in the number of cranes that dot the skyline [...]. The most prominent structures are the 47-storey shafts of the Changjon Street apartments, an 18-tower complex completed last year in less than 12 months and nicknamed &ldquo;Pyonghattan&rdquo; by foreign diplomats. But other emerging skyscrapers go undiscussed and unphotographed [...].</p></em><br /><br /><p>Related stories on Archinect and our sister site <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Bustler</a>:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">&ldquo;Crow&rsquo;s Eye View&rdquo;, from the 2014 Venice Biennale Korean Pavilion, returns as a NY exhibition</a> (Bustler)</li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">North Korean architect of new Pyongyang airport reportedly executed by Kim Jong Un</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">North Koreans hesitate to move into Kim Jong Un's shiny, new apartment towers</a></li></ul> As bicycle ownership in North Korea rises, Pyongyang introduces bike lanes Alexander Walter 2015-07-14T12:59:00-04:00 >2015-07-14T13:06:12-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="308" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>North Korea has installed cycle lanes on major thoroughfares in Pyongyang in an apparent bid to cut down on pedestrian accidents, as more residents are able to afford to buy bicycles. Bicycles are an expensive but increasingly popular mode of transport for many in the country where private car ownership, although on the rise, is still rare. [...] As recently as 2014, cycling was still illegal for women, though the ban was much flouted.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Related:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">North Korean architect of new Pyongyang airport reportedly executed by Kim Jong Un</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Lessons from North Korean urbanism</a> &amp; <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">part 2</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">What The Future Looks Like To North Koreans Who Have Never Left</a></li></ul> North Korean architect of new Pyongyang airport reportedly executed by Kim Jong Un Alexander Walter 2015-06-29T13:31:00-04:00 >2015-06-29T17:34:09-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="289" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>North Korea's propaganda machine has spent days promoting a new airport in Pyongyang, showcasing the building's sleek glass walls and espresso stations. But the images, which feature Supreme Leader Kim Jong Un, fail to mention that the building's principal designer was likely executed last year because Kim was unhappy with the design.</p></em><br /><br /><p>While the starving population of <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">North Korea</a> will likely never going to enjoy the airport's amenities (under the current circumstances), it has shown more direct feedback to other key-interest projects of the supreme despot, like the&nbsp;46-story&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Taedong River Apartment Towers</a> which remain unoccupied from floors 20 and up due to frequent power shortages and unreliable elevators.</p> North and South Korean archaeologists are working together to excavate Korea's medieval capital Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-06-12T13:07:00-04:00 >2015-06-12T13:07:07-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="289" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The site is located in Kaesong, the old imperial capital of medieval Korea, now a small industrial city located in North Korea, just north of the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) dividing the Republic of Korea (ROK) and the Democratic People&rsquo;s Republic of Korea (DPRK). [...] &ldquo;There were wars of nerves between South and North scholars due to differences in methodologies, but we were in a same boat on the achievement of this excavation.&rdquo;</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> North Koreans hesitate to move into Kim Jong Un's shiny, new apartment towers Alexander Walter 2015-06-03T15:39:00-04:00 >2015-06-03T16:26:42-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="341" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Despite seeing completion last October, following orders from leader Kim Jong Un, only half of the units of a major apartment complex built near Pyongyang&rsquo;s Taedong River are currently occupied. [...] &ldquo;The elevator runs only during breakfast, lunch, and dinner hours, so for long spans of time it will be impossible to get to the 40th floor,&rdquo; the source said. &ldquo;There isn&rsquo;t even a place for people to put their bicycles, which are the most fundamental tools for people&rsquo;s livelihoods.&rdquo;</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> NIMBYs go to court over "modern" home; Zaha gets an apology; global warming rages on: News Round-Up for August 25, 2014 Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2014-09-02T20:07:00-04:00 >2014-09-02T22:16:14-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="342" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p><em><strong>Friday, August 29:</strong></em></p><ul><li><p><a title="MIT's MindRider helmet draws mental maps as you bike" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">MIT's MindRider helmet draws mental maps as you bike</a>: The prototype is currently being used to create a mental-map and guidebook for NYC, and an upcoming Kickstarter campaign will attempt to fund the project for commercial sale.</p></li><li><p><a title="In Beirut, a grassroots push for more grass" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">In Beirut, a grassroots push for more grass</a>: Lebanon's fifteen-year civil war made much of Beirut's green space inaccessible or dysfunctional. The Beirut Green Project is trying to bring at least a modicum of green space back to the city's residents.</p></li></ul><p><em><strong>Thursday, August 28:</strong></em></p><ul><li><a title="Norwegian artists plan to open art academy in North Korea" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Norwegian artists plan to open art academy in North Korea</a>: Nothing's final yet, but the school is committed to its disbelief in sanctions or boycotts on art.</li><li><a title="Alvar Aalto gets a close look from Google's Cultural Institute" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Alvar Aalto gets a close look from Google's Cultural Institute</a>: Google's cameras go inside the famous Finnish architects studio, as well as a selection of his works, for a curated photo-exhibition.</li></ul><p><em><strong>Wednesday, August 27:</strong></em></p><ul><li><a title="China considering drastic ban on coal" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">China considering drastic ban on coal</a>: Chinese news outlets claim that work is underway to ban coal in Bei...</li></ul> Norwegian artists plan to open art academy in North Korea Alexander Walter 2014-08-28T13:20:00-04:00 >2014-08-28T16:49:57-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="339" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The North Korean government has approved plans by two Norwegian artists to open an art academy in the country. Henrik Placht and Morten Traavik travelled to North Korea together for the first time in August to flesh out the proposal and to look for potential sponsors. So far they have received financial support from the Prince Claus Fund. [...] &ldquo;One of the reasons for us going to North Korea is that we don&rsquo;t believe in sanctions and the boycott of art,&rdquo; Placht tells The Art Newspaper.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> What The Future Looks Like To North Koreans Who Have Never Left Archinect 2014-07-28T17:47:00-04:00 >2014-08-13T22:16:12-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="385" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>[...] One of its latest projects: Inviting a North Korean architect to imagine the future of local design for travel. The Jetsons-style results include hovercraft hotel rooms and cone-shaped mountain villas connected by ski slopes. Nothing looks like it would be that out of place in a 1950s magazine, down to details like an old-fashioned rotary phone. This is what the future looks like to someone living in a place that's been cut off from the rest of the world since 1948.</p></em><br /><br /><p>The project <em>Utopian Tours</em>, initiated by English-born landscape architect turned Beijing-based North Korea tour operator <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Nick Bonner</a>, was part of the Korean Peninsula&rsquo;s &ldquo;Crow&rsquo;s Eye View&rdquo; pavilion for the 2014 Venice Biennale (<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">previously on Archinect</a>).</p> Details into the Korean Peninsula’s “Crow’s Eye View” pavilion for the 2014 Venice Biennale Justine Testado 2014-05-27T20:29:00-04:00 >2014-06-03T23:03:55-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="404" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>In the Korean Peninsula's response to the 2014 Venice Biennale theme of rediscovering national identity through architecture, the "Crow's Eye View" pavilion explores the divided state of North and South Korea, and extends that discussion to the global state of architecture itself. The multi-themed pavilion uses architecture as a key to discovering new narratives of the peninsula's complex past, present, and future in an architectural and social perspective.</p></em><br /><br /><p><img title="" alt="" src=""><img title="" alt="" src=""><img title="" alt="" src=""><img title="" alt="" src=""><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Find details of the pavilion on <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Bustler</a>.<br><br>Related: <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><strong>A rare look at North Korean architecture, brought to you by non-Koreans</strong></a></p> A rare look at North Korean architecture, brought to you by non-Koreans Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2014-05-23T11:43:00-04:00 >2014-05-30T13:09:37-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="385" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>The Korea pavilion has been a part of the Venice Architecture Biennale since 1993, when the optimism of the post-Berlin Wall era made reunification between North and South Korea seem plausible. But getting equal representation from both Northern and Southern architects &nbsp;in 2014 has proved nearly impossible -- architects from the North would never seek individualized attention for their work, their practice entirely determined by guidelines set in stone by "Kim Jong-il's Architectural Theory".</p><p>Minsuk Cho, principal of <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Mass Studies</a> in Seoul and the curator of Korea's 2014 pavilion, thought he'd have to give up on the idea of a joint North-South effort when communications with North Korea fizzled out, without explanation. This year's Biennale's theme, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">"Absorbing Modernity: 1914-2014"</a>, is particularly relevant for Korea, considering both North and South remade their political and architectural landscapes after the Korean War, in the midst of mid-century modernism's development and the bi...</p> Lessons from North Korean urbanism, pt. 2 Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2014-01-10T14:56:00-05:00 >2014-01-13T20:57:40-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="332" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>I foresee that major urban spaces of Pyongyang, such as Kim Il Sung Square, will be used as &ldquo;public&rdquo; space with a greater variety of urban activities, such as commercial activities and show events. [...] The last thing that may happen in North Korea, or the thing that should not happen in some sense, is the Chinese model. Considering the scale of the economy and the potential of the North Korean market compared to China, it is hard to picture radical and massive urban development in Pyongyang.</p></em><br /><br /><p> Part two of <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><em>NK News</em>' interview with Dongwoo Yim</a> pushes the discussion of North Korean urbanism into the future, comparing potential development methods to those seen in China and South Korea. Focusing on capital Pyongyang, Yim proposes a "Bilbao effect" development strategy that is heavy on catalytic architecture, and soft on strategy -- Pyongyang has very strict development restrictions that keep it from expanding, and will not be remodeling its mass-demonstration public spaces anytime soon.</p> <p> Yim suggests that those spaces can be relevant in a post-dictatorship North Korea, and that they should be re-appropriated rather than razed for their history. How a hypothetical reunification with South Korea would look depends on how North Korean statehood is interpreted, as either autonomous or an infringement on South Korean land. But the prevailing lesson in Yim's interview is that Pyongyang is not going to be another Seoul, Guangzhou or Shenzhen, and will ultimately have to rely on it...</p> Lessons from North Korean urbanism Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2014-01-08T15:43:00-05:00 >2014-01-13T20:57:07-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="268" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>They conceive of urban space as space owned by the public, not space for real estate development.</p></em><br /><br /><p> Much of the North Korean news that reaches the United States reads like tabloid hearsay, as glimpses of a totalitarian dictatorship rife with human rights violations are peeked through <a href=",0,4827481.story" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Dennis Rodman</a> and <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">military showboating</a>. <em><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">NK News</a></em>, an independent and private news source based in Washington, D.C., is unique to both online journalism and treatment of its subject, in its rigorous and impressively connected focus on North Korean life and policy. Written from sources both in and out of the DPRK, <em>NK News </em>will most certainly get you to think differently about North Korea.</p> <p> In part one of his interview with <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Dongwoo Yim</a>, founder of the firm <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">PRAUD</a> and author of <em>Pyongyang, and Pyongyang After</em>, <em>NK News</em>' Academic / Research Director Gianluca Spezza takes a step back from current politics to ask Yim about the past and future of capital city Pyongyang's urban development. If Korea were to reunify, how would Pyongyang posture itself against Seoul, South Korea's megapolis capital?</p> <p> Most of Nor...</p> Propaganda artists from North Korea paint a rose-tinted China Quilian Riano 2013-10-21T12:15:00-04:00 >2013-10-23T18:45:25-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="372" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>A jovial group of Red Guards bask in the golden glow of cornfields, waving their flags at the magnificent harvest, while a rustic farming couple look on, carrying an overflowing basket of perfectly plump red apples. In the centre of this vision of optimism, where once might have beamed the cheerful face of Mao, stands the twisted loop of the China Central Television (CCTV) headquarters, radiating a lilac sheen.</p></em><br /><br /><p> The Beautiful Future sees icons of Beijing's skyline reimagined by a team of propaganda painters in Pyongyang</p> Revealed: Plans for North Korea’s new $200m international airport Alexander Walter 2013-07-29T12:42:00-04:00 >2013-07-29T22:42:18-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="255" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Architectural plans for a $200m airport on North Korea&rsquo;s east coast have been made available to NK News by PLT, a Hong Kong-based architectural firm bidding to design what North Korea hopes will serve as a major transportation hub for the Kumgang Tourism Zone (KTZ).</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> Kingdom of Kitsch Archinect 2012-12-31T12:12:00-05:00 >2013-01-01T19:58:10-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The oversize public monuments and buildings in the capital of North Korea confirm the subservience of the citizen to the state and display the ghastly aesthetic imperatives of totalitarian art.</p></em><br /><br /><p> The WSJ's Eric Gibson reviews the book "Architectural and Cultural Guide: Pyongyang," edited by Philipp Meuser, a German architect and architectural historian.</p> North Korea Ryugyong 'Hotel of Doom' may open next year Archinect 2012-11-05T15:30:00-05:00 >2012-11-12T09:22:36-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="342" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>A delegation from the European Union Chamber of Commerce in Korea, which inspected the building almost 15 years ago, concluded it was beyond repair and its lift shafts crooked. But in 2008 an Egyptian company, Orascom Telecom, which operates a mobile network in North Korea, began equipping the building. Mr Wittwer said the hotel will "partially, probably" open for business next year. But original plans for 3,000 hotel rooms and three revolving restaurants have been greatly scaled back.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html>