Archinect - News 2014-11-27T23:22:43-05:00 http://archinect.com/news/article/113876375/barry-diller-pledges-130m-for-futuristic-offshore-park-on-the-west-side Barry Diller Pledges $130M for Futuristic Offshore Park on the West Side dschulz18 2014-11-17T13:27:00-05:00 >2014-11-19T19:58:28-05:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/zi/ziu0w35nwr4xln2e.jpg" width="514" height="294" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>After being approached over two years ago about the idea, Barry Diller initiated a design competition, ultimately selecting British architect Thomas Heatherwick of Heatherwick Studio, famous for designing the Olympic caldron for the 2012 Summer Olympics in London. Landscape architect Mathews Nielsen will also lend his hand. Some critics of the idea are not happy about the secretive planning and how private funds will be used to construct a public park.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Billionaire media mogul, and largest private donor to the High Line, Barry Diller has pledged $130 million of the $170 million total to build a floating park and performance venue known as Pier 55 off 14th Street in the Meatpacking District. The 2.7-acre park will be located 186 feet off land, and contain wooded nooks and three performance venues, including an amphitheater. It will be an undulating platform set atop 300 mushroom-shaped concrete columns that&nbsp;will range in height from 70 feet to 15 feet above the water.</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/80594824/waterworld-koen-olthuis-floating-structures-from-slums-to-stadiums Waterworld: Koen Olthuis' floating structures, from slums to stadiums Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2013-08-29T14:17:00-04:00 >2013-09-02T19:48:34-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/c8/c8bqo48pc7ryc5st.jpg" width="514" height="654" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>[It] is the same technology as we use in Holland. It&rsquo;s made up of concrete caisson, boxes, a shoebox of concrete. We fill them with styrofoam. So with [these] you get unthinkable floating foundations [...] The house itself is the same as a normal house, the same material. Then you want to figure out how to get water and electricity and remove sewage and use the same technology as cruise ships." - Koen Olthuis</p></em><br /><br /><p> Dutch architect Koen Olthuis sees the future of architecture floating out to sea -- quite literally. Responding to undeniable ecological shifts of rising sea levels and seasonal flooding, Olthuis has proposed floatable-projects all along the social spectrum, designing prefabricated multi-use units for waterfront slums in Dhaka, "amphibious" housing in Holland and Columbia,&nbsp;private island-villas for the "stupidly rich", and foldable Olympic stadiums.</p> <p> See projects from Olthius'&nbsp;<a href="http://www.waterstudio.nl/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Waterstudio.NL</a>, in the tradition of <a href="http://archinect.com/news/article/49772782/floating-architecture-finding-ways-to-live-with-rising-water" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">floating architecture inspired by Dutch history and worldwide realities</a>.</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/49772782/floating-architecture-finding-ways-to-live-with-rising-water Floating Architecture: Finding Ways to Live With Rising Water Archinect 2012-05-31T14:58:00-04:00 >2012-06-15T09:43:47-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/fa/fafbqnd2pzrgxl8a.jpg" width="514" height="354" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>There is a saying that "God made the world, but the Dutch made Holland." And for centuries, the Dutch have built different types of barriers to hold back rising water and allow for development. But as sea levels continue to rise, instead of trying to fight the water, Dutch architects and urban planners are taking a new approach: finding ways to live with it.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/loose.dtd"> <html><head><meta></head></html> http://archinect.com/news/article/30929754/startup-ducks-immigration-law-with-googleplex-of-the-sea Startup Ducks Immigration Law With 'Googleplex of the Sea' Archinect 2011-12-14T17:06:17-05:00 >2011-12-14T20:52:41-05:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/f3/f341cd5fcb8021a28a70dbe960c9fef7.jpg" width="514" height="247" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Blueseed says U.S. immigration law is choking the flow of &ldquo;bold and creative&rdquo; entrepreneurs into Silicon Valley. So it&rsquo;s building a floating IT fortress where entrepreneurs can be bold and creative right next to Silicon Valley without actually setting foot on U.S. soil.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/loose.dtd"> <html><head><meta></head></html>