Archinect - News 2014-04-20T12:07:01-04:00 http://archinect.com/news/article/93502802/la-mayor-talks-urbanism-and-mass-transit-with-architecture-critic-christopher-hawthorne LA Mayor talks urbanism and mass transit with architecture critic Christopher Hawthorne Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2014-02-14T18:06:00-05:00 >2014-02-17T19:53:01-05:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/6h/6hcw380ewv5k92mz.jpg" width="514" height="396" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Last night on the bucolic hilltop campus of Occidental College, Los Angeles Mayor&nbsp;Eric Garcetti spoke with the Los Angeles <em>Times</em> architecture critic, Christopher Hawthorne, about the state of L.A. urbanism. This broad topical platform positioned Hawthorne's interview not as a political interrogation, nor as a staged public appearance, but as a relaxed discourse for Garcetti to mention policy while riffing on the kind of place he believes L.A. is becoming. You can review Archinect's live-tweets of the event <a href="https://twitter.com/search?q=%23oxyurbanism&amp;src=typd&amp;f=realtime" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">here</a>.</p><p>The discourse of L.A. urbanism is often bogged down by insufficient comparisons and false dichotomies -- sprawl vs. density, cyclists vs. drivers, liberals vs. libertarians, east vs. west, etc. -- that doggedly try to force the region into the conventions of other, completely incomparable cities. Early on, Hawthorne made clear that "Los Angeles" has to be thought of on the "regional scale", and shouldn't copy the developmental models of radically different cities. Garcetti ce...</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/73568647/navy-pier-remake-adds-urban-park-elements Navy Pier remake adds urban park elements Archinect 2013-05-20T14:53:00-04:00 >2013-05-21T17:58:26-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/v4/v4yx71rtqstvkjox.jpg" width="514" height="379" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Some members of Chicago's design community have said privately that the Navy Pier project's parameters, which limited the scope of changes, stifled creative possibilities, even for highly regarded designers such as Corner. "Anything that makes it more parklike is all to the good," said eclectic Chicago architect Stanley Tigerman. "It can only go up, architecturally."</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/loose.dtd"> <html><head><meta></head></html> http://archinect.com/news/article/67784286/our-parks-are-not-for-sale Our Parks Are Not for Sale Nam Henderson 2013-02-17T17:15:00-05:00 >2013-02-19T13:10:15-05:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/rp/rpxmo6yp559mhdnd.jpg" width="514" height="235" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Community activism that simply nibbles at the edges is not enough. Small-scale rebellions can raise consciousness and help bring needed improvements to cities, but what we really need is a revolution.</p></em><br /><br /><p> In the Winter 2013 issue of Dissent (the quarterly magazine of politics and ideas), Alex Ulam follows a thread <em>From the Gold Coast of New York to the Venice Biennale</em>.&nbsp;He argues&nbsp; <a href="http://www.spontaneousinterventions.org/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Spontaneous Interventions</a> "<em>was not an outlier at the Biennale</em>" but indicative of a general movement in support of the "Right to the City". Mr. Ulam then lays out a frame, wherein, the fact that many "<em>municipal parks agencies have become charity cases</em>", a new awareness of POPs, plus the continued selling off of corporate naming rights, are all examples of cities "<em>being redesigned to benefit moneyed interests</em>".</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/29801126/treasuring-urban-oases Treasuring Urban Oases anthony dong 2011-12-04T22:45:19-05:00 >2011-12-08T09:16:02-05:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/aw/awqi3lsz0il5m0v3.jpg" width="514" height="308" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>...the city should reverse its approach, zoning neighborhoods like Midtown, Lower Manhattan and Williamsburg, Brooklyn, by thinking first about the shape of public space instead of private development.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/loose.dtd"> <html><head><meta></head></html>