Archinect - News 2015-11-26T12:56:21-05:00 How NYC institutions raise billions of dollars for new projects Nam Henderson 2015-10-26T12:06:00-04:00 >2015-10-26T12:06:32-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="457" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>But still strong is the seduction of the Bilbao Effect &mdash; when an architecturally exciting project makes an institution more of a destination, like Frank Gehry&rsquo;s Guggenheim in Spain. And with the success of the new Whitney Museum of American Art, which is drawing droves downtown, everyone seems to be grabbing for hammers</p></em><br /><br /><p>Robin Pogrebin&nbsp;explores how with more than a dozen New York cultural institutions planning major projects, fundraisers are hoping to tap into the deepest pockets. Strategies include selling naming rights, targeting&nbsp;heavyweights donors, remembering certain 'Dos and Don&rsquo;ts' and expanding boards to increase the pool of donors.</p><p>All that being said, perhaps these organizations would be wise to remember the 2012 results of <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Set in Stone</a>,&nbsp;from&nbsp;The Cultural Policy Center at the University of Chicago. The authors found that "<em>It found that in many instances, building new or expanding existing facilities proved challenging and put enormous strain on institutions</em>" or as the NYT summarized <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">For Arts Institutions, Thinking Big Can Be Suicidal</a>.</p> Editor's Picks #429 Nam Henderson 2015-09-18T12:46:00-04:00 >2015-09-28T21:21:27-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="303" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Today's Editor's Picks is a special themed "place based" edition - highlighting content (old/newish) from the archives/site - about Denver and Colorado. Partly as an apology for the brief/unexpected lull in the Picks. Also, inspired by my own recent relocation to The Mile High City. Just one part of an ongoing attempt to learn about my new home.</p></em><br /><br /><p>While MArch students at the University of Colorado, Denver, Patrick Beseda and Lacy Williams realized a design/build project for a micro-dwelling. <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">FOUNDhouse</a> inspired by the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">WikiHouse project</a>, was an exploration of digital fabrication, the possibilities of DIY and the democratization of housing/shelter.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><br><strong>News</strong><br>Back in the 1990s the Denver area was site of an <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">extreme makeover </a>(aka environmental remediation) for the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">6,500 acre</a> Rocky Flats DOE nuclear industrial site.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Archinect ex-Editor in Chief | Staff Editor <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">John Jourden</a>&nbsp;coined <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Bil(Denver)bao</a>&nbsp;in response to the news that <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">David Adjaye</a>, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Steven Holl</a>, and <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Daniel Libeskind</a>, all had active projects in the same city - Denver. Similarly in a <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">post</a> on how cities across America are gambling on architecture to revitalize aging downtowns, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Orhan Ayy&uuml;ce</a>&nbsp;criticized "<em>i hate the new 'ready made culture' trend. new museums=starbucks</em>".</p><p>Richard Florida used occupational data from the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">labor market data and research firm EMSI</a> to map&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">America's Leading Design Cit...</a></p> Art museums are more popular than ever – but what about the art inside? Nicholas Korody 2015-08-17T18:14:00-04:00 >2015-08-24T21:53:31-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="386" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>...What [Gehry's Guggenheim Bilbao] showed, [is that] if you picked a remote part of the world and put a world-class museum in it, the world would beat a path to your door. That's the so-called "Bilbao Effect," but you'll notice that doesn't mention art; it mentions tourism, travel and finance. I feel we're in a strange time where we're building furious Potemkin villages of seeming life, behind which, if you looked with the right eyes, you would see cobwebs and skeletons.</p></em><br /><br /><p>NPR has curated a list of noteworthy-quotes from&nbsp;Michael Lewis, an art history professor at Williams College, who's interviewed in the recent issue of <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Commentary Magazine</a>.</p><p>Never before has art sold better or museums drawn larger crowds. Yet, according to Lewis at least, most Americans have become "indifferent" to art.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Lewis isn't the first to note that today's spectacular museums serve as a fa&ccedil;ade that hides a pitiful situation in contemporary art. The contemporary artist and pioneer of institutional critique, Andrea Fraser, made a video in 2001 that touched on exactly this issue.</p><p>Entitled,&nbsp;<em>Little Frank and His Carp</em>, the work (posted below; warning, vaguely NSFW) features Fraser as she tours the lobby of the newly-opened Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao. As Fraser listens to the audio guide describe the architecture in gushing, ecstatic terms, the artist herself verges on a near-sexual experience.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>In a 2005 interview, excerpted on <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">UbuWeb</a>, Fraser explains, "What struck me about the audio tour...</p> The tiny village library that draws Beijingers in droves Alexander Walter 2015-07-06T14:44:00-04:00 >2015-07-11T19:41:13-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="342" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>&ldquo;The library is a tool to attract people to the village,&rdquo; said Mr. Li, a professor of architecture at Tsinghua University in Beijing. When visitors come to see the library, he said, they also spend money at the village&rsquo;s few restaurants, pay parking fees and donate money for the building&rsquo;s upkeep. &ldquo;The place is special,&rdquo; said Li Wenli, 45, an insurance saleswoman from Beijing [...].</p></em><br /><br /><p>Call it a rural Bilbao Effect or not, we're still quite excited that Archinect was one of the very first outlets to publish <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Li Xiaodong</a>'s stunning Liyuan Library building: First spotted on the popular <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><em>China Builds</em></a> blog and then, in a little more detail, as a <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">ShowCase installment</a>&nbsp;in the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Features</a> section.</p><p>The poetic envelope for the small village library has been well recognized since then &mdash;&nbsp;last fall,&nbsp;Li Xiaodong was presented&nbsp;the inaugural <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">2014 Moriyama RAIC International Prize</a> of $100,000 CAD.</p> Will Pamplona's "Bilbao Effect" gamble pay off? Alexander Walter 2015-01-26T13:27:00-05:00 >2015-02-02T21:34:45-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="289" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The Museo Universidad de Navarra, a brand new gallery designed by the renowned Rafael Moneo, may lead to a stampede of art lovers every bit as important to Pamplona as the running of the bulls [...] The architect is Rafael Moneo, a Pritzker prizewinner and native of Navarre province. [...] If the architecture of the new gallery is not as eye-catching as Frank Gehry&rsquo;s Guggenheim, the collection is more impressive [...].</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> ‘Museum directors hated Bilbao’ Alexander Walter 2014-10-13T18:00:00-04:00 >2014-10-15T23:18:38-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>At 85, the architect Frank Gehry has neither stopped building nor started repeating himself and this month offers plenty of proof. Besides the unveiling of the Fondation Louis Vuitton in Paris, which he designed for the billionaire Bernard Arnault, the explosively coloured Biomuseo in Panama opened on 2 October followed by a retrospective at the Centre Pompidou, which opened on Wednesday, 8 October (until 26 January 2015). Gehry dispels some common misconceptions about his museum designs.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Related: <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Gehry-designed Fondation Louis Vuitton to open this October</a></p> Berlin hopes Germany's tallest residential tower has the 'Bilbao effect' Alexander Walter 2014-01-28T14:38:00-05:00 >2014-02-03T19:20:37-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="308" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The tallest residential block in Germany is to rise up next to Berlin's needle-like TV tower by 2017. Designed by the US architect Frank Gehry and paid for by US real estate firm Hines, the 150-metre (492ft) building on Alexanderplatz will have 39 floors, with about 300 apartments, restaurants, a hotel and a spa. [...] Nonetheless, the city senate's building director, Regula L&uuml;scher, welcomed the plans for "an extremely striking new landmark".</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> Lessons from North Korean urbanism, pt. 2 Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2014-01-10T14:56:00-05:00 >2014-01-13T20:57:40-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="332" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>I foresee that major urban spaces of Pyongyang, such as Kim Il Sung Square, will be used as &ldquo;public&rdquo; space with a greater variety of urban activities, such as commercial activities and show events. [...] The last thing that may happen in North Korea, or the thing that should not happen in some sense, is the Chinese model. Considering the scale of the economy and the potential of the North Korean market compared to China, it is hard to picture radical and massive urban development in Pyongyang.</p></em><br /><br /><p> Part two of <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><em>NK News</em>' interview with Dongwoo Yim</a> pushes the discussion of North Korean urbanism into the future, comparing potential development methods to those seen in China and South Korea. Focusing on capital Pyongyang, Yim proposes a "Bilbao effect" development strategy that is heavy on catalytic architecture, and soft on strategy -- Pyongyang has very strict development restrictions that keep it from expanding, and will not be remodeling its mass-demonstration public spaces anytime soon.</p> <p> Yim suggests that those spaces can be relevant in a post-dictatorship North Korea, and that they should be re-appropriated rather than razed for their history. How a hypothetical reunification with South Korea would look depends on how North Korean statehood is interpreted, as either autonomous or an infringement on South Korean land. But the prevailing lesson in Yim's interview is that Pyongyang is not going to be another Seoul, Guangzhou or Shenzhen, and will ultimately have to rely on it...</p> Containers without Content Orhan Ayyüce 2013-07-22T12:33:00-04:00 >2013-07-29T20:25:45-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="299" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Far from being anchored in the local context, the project (the disastrous City of Culture of Galicia outside Santiago de Compostela, designed by Peter Eisenman) has decapitated Monte de Gaias and replaced it with a phony landscape with curves like those of a fun-fair roller coaster. These cynical intellectual manipulations cannot mask the reality of structures resembling supermarkets twisted about with algorithms and camouflaged with a thin veneer of granite (imported from Brasil!).</p></em><br /><br /><p> In a short sweet and illustrated article writer historian&nbsp;William J.R. Curtis puts several Bilbao effect projects in the trash can. It might as well be called "f..k content."</p> $300 Million "No Frank Gehry" Award Paul Petrunia 2011-04-26T11:31:15-04:00 >2014-04-27T15:28:08-04:00 <img src="" width="397" height="245" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>An Iowa-based philanthropist and architecture aficionado has offered a $300 million reward to any city anywhere in the world that dares to hire someone other than Frank Gehry to design its gleaming new art museum.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html>