Archinect - News 2014-10-24T13:23:10-04:00 http://archinect.com/news/article/91825645/eko-atlantic-privatized-vs-collective-ecological-survival Eko Atlantic - privatized vs. collective, ecological survival Nam Henderson 2014-01-22T10:02:00-05:00 >2014-01-22T13:37:38-05:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/aw/awodqa4nacs3fexf.jpg" width="514" height="280" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The disaster capitalists behind Eko Atlantic have seized on climate change to push through pro-corporate plans to build a city of their dreams, an architectural insult to the daily circumstances of ordinary Nigerians.</p></em><br /><br /><p> Martin Lukacs argues that <a href="http://www.ekoatlantic.com/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Eko Atlantic</a>, a new privatized city to be built near Lagos, Nigeria, is the perfect illustration of how the super-rich will exploit the crisis of climate change to increase inequality and seal themselves off from its impacts.</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/74198114/school-at-sea School at Sea Orhan Ayy├╝ce 2013-05-30T14:10:00-04:00 >2013-06-01T21:02:46-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/0t/0ttzrt34ip6qcqff.jpg" width="514" height="342" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>In Makoko, a sprawling slum on the waterfront of Lagos, Nigeria, tens of thousands of people live in rickety wood houses teetering above the fetid lagoon. It&rsquo;s an old fishing village on stilts, increasingly battered by floods from heavy rains and rising seas. Because the settlement was becoming dangerous, the government forcibly cleared part of it last year.</p></em><br /><br /><p> <em>Kunle Adeyemi, a Nigerian architect, had a better idea. He and his team asked what the community wanted, and with its help and money from the Heinrich B&ouml;ll Foundation and the United Nations, he devised a floating school: a low-cost three-story A-frame, buoyed by about 250 plastic barrels, with a 1,000-square-foot play area, classrooms, rainwater collection and composting toilets. Made to serve 100 elementary-school children, the building provides a flexible and robust prototype for housing and other potential structures. In Iwan Baan&rsquo;s mystical photographs, Makoko emerges as a kind of crazy-quilt grid. The school, just opened, stands apart, its peak rising above the rest of the settlement, like a lighthouse.</em></p> <p> Michael Kimmelman, <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2013/05/26/magazine/26look-lagos.html?_r=0" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">NYT</a></p> http://archinect.com/news/article/68859546/in-lagos-the-poorest-are-paying-the-price-of-progress In Lagos the poorest are paying the price of progress Nam Henderson 2013-03-05T14:00:00-05:00 >2013-03-05T18:16:21-05:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/ah/ahujpgp56u0k886x.jpg" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The Lagos state commissioner for housing, Adedeji Olatubosun Jeje, provided a different version of events. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s a regeneration of a slum,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;We gave enough notification. The government intends to develop 1,008 housing units. What we removed was just shanties.</p></em><br /><br /><p> Adam Nossiter covers recent slum clearance efforts&nbsp;led by the&nbsp;&nbsp;governor of Lagos, Babatunde Fashola. As Lagos aims to become a premier business center, the city&rsquo;s poor and homeless are becoming the government&rsquo;s enemy. Last week,&nbsp;parts of Badia East (with perhaps 10,000 residents) were demolished while last summer the floating neighborhood of Makoko (which was home to perhaps 30,000). In total activists estimate upwards of a million people have been forcibly ejected from their homes over the last 15 years.</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/26648463/africa-s-first-plastic-bottle-house-rises-in-nigeria Africa's First Plastic Bottle House Rises in Nigeria MikeChino 2011-11-07T15:07:21-05:00 >2011-11-14T12:21:44-05:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/kg/kgn4kk7wd0fqdw8p.jpg" width="514" height="383" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The Development Association for Renewable Energies (DARE) &ndash; an NGO based in Nigeria &ndash; is almost finished with an incredible two-bedroom bungalow entirely out of plastic bottles. Although many in Kaduna were dubious when the project began construction in June this year, the nearly-complete home is bullet and fireproof, earthquake resistant, and maintains a comfortable interior temperature of 64 degrees fahrenheit year round.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/loose.dtd"> <html><head><meta></head></html>