Archinect - News 2015-10-08T19:38:44-04:00 The Pulaski Skyway tells the tale of America's aging highway system Alexander Walter 2015-06-16T13:49:00-04:00 >2015-06-16T15:59:36-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="411" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Just north of Newark, New Jersey, the Pulaski Skyway became the country&rsquo;s first so-called &ldquo;superhighway&rdquo; &mdash; a 3.5-mile raised roadway running over the top of some of the most heavily industrialized property in the country. [...] In infrastructure terms, the Pulaski is what&rsquo;s called &ldquo;functionally obsolete,&rdquo; meaning it doesn&rsquo;t meet modern design standards &mdash;and the money being spent to fix it up won&rsquo;t change that.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> Rural Japanese town applies "creative depopulation" to attract millennials in aging population Justine Testado 2015-06-03T13:45:00-04:00 >2015-06-04T20:10:43-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="341" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>As rural Japan battles the twin afflictions of a population that is getting smaller almost as quickly as it&rsquo;s getting older, Kamiyama is one of a handful of towns that is bucking the trend. It&rsquo;s practicing 'creative depopulation' &mdash; trying to make sure it gets younger and more innovative, even as it shrinks, by attracting youthful newcomers who are weary of big-city life to work in new rural industries.</p></em><br /><br /><p>More:</p><p><a title="Find your ideal neighborhood with this new 'Livability Index' online tool" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Find your ideal neighborhood with this new 'Livability Index' online tool</a></p><p><a title="Revisiting Sharon Zukin's &quot;Loft Living&quot; and NYC gentrification" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Revisiting Sharon Zukin's "Loft Living" and NYC gentrification</a></p><p><a title="Renzo Piano: the future of European architecture lies in the suburbs" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Renzo Piano: the future of European architecture lies in the suburbs</a></p><p><a title='Designing for Seniors and Soldiers, Toward a "Silver" Architecture' href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Designing for Seniors and Soldiers, Toward a "Silver" Architecture</a></p> Design for an Aging Population Anna Johnson 2013-02-06T23:23:00-05:00 >2013-02-12T16:39:04-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="304" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>A new multidisciplinary field has emerged in several universities in which sociologists, psychologists and urban planners work to tailor architectural designs to seniors as that demographic continues to grow. In America, 54 million people are over the age of 55 and that number is predicted to increase over the next 30 years by nearly 50 per cent. Despite most people&rsquo;s desire to age in their own homes, most will be required to seek alternative arrangements.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> Better technology does not equal better architecture Nam Henderson 2013-01-23T18:05:00-05:00 >2013-01-29T09:50:11-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>How can we let geriatrics design the future? There is a creeping conservatism in old age, Rogers and Piano&rsquo;s Pompidou was genuinely revolutionary, but that was in 1977, ever since then they've been riffing off the same ideas, with decreasing vitality...They are past retirement age and yet they march on, pulling out the same ideas over and over again, while the planet fawns obsequiously at their feet.</p></em><br /><br /><p> As part of Vice Future Week, Eddie Blake pens a critique of the current geriatric state of architecture. He believes that we must move beyond the tired designs of the past and embrace a new emerging architecture. The future of architecture is more co-operative, varied, often temporary and emphasizes "<em>the evolution of a building, rather than how it looks as a finished piece</em>".</p> <p> H/T <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">sevensixfive</a></p> An Octogenarian’s Modernist Dream Comes to Life Archinect 2012-05-10T13:51:00-04:00 >2012-05-10T16:54:53-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="490" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>&ldquo;Here is the most modern of modern houses I&rsquo;ve ever seen and loved,&rdquo; she wrote, describing the turquoise mosaic tile, the compact state-of-the-art kitchen, the distant views of city lights, the proximity to her daughter&rsquo;s family and the circular stairway that she felt, sadly, too old to sail down. &ldquo;I guess you can&rsquo;t expect to have too many dreams answered,&rdquo; she concluded. &ldquo;At least, I&rsquo;ve had the opportunity to see the Morris House, to know it existed.&rdquo;</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> A Nursing Home Shrinks Until It Feels Like a Home anthony dong 2011-11-01T07:59:25-04:00 >2011-11-27T11:46:03-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="303" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The Green House concept is the most comprehensive effort to reinvent the nursing home ...&mdash; including the way medical care is delivered. In traditional nursing homes, employees typically have narrowly defined jobs ... based on efficiency that tends to ignore individuals&rsquo; preferences and needs.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> Gordon Walker designs a house for the future Paul Petrunia 2011-10-10T15:14:25-04:00 >2011-11-24T09:05:52-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="342" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Walker showed his idea around. The response was near freezing. "So far, people don't like them," he says. "They say, 'I want something I recognize.' "The baby boomers are coming of age, and I always imagined that they were more design-minded than they turned out to be." Or they just haven't caught up to Gordon Walker.</p></em><br /><br /><p> A Seattle architect designs a house for him and his wife to grow old in, and realizes he's way more cool than most other senior citizens.</p>