Archinect - News 2015-10-06T12:33:23-04:00 The evolution of street photography in the Instagram age Alexander Walter 2015-05-07T13:06:00-04:00 >2015-05-13T19:05:13-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="349" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Instagram may very well have enabled a whole generation of false artisans&mdash;and even encouraged clich&eacute; street imagery by promoting hashtags like #middleoftheroad and #strideby through its Weekend Hashtag Project&mdash;but the effect may not be so terrible. Quoted in The Telegraph in 2011, Teru Kuwayama, a photojournalist who is now photo community manager at Facebook, compared the rise of Instagram to the advent of electronic music, both of which stimulated &ldquo;amateur expression.&rdquo;</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> Looking to Houston — Yes, Houston — as a Model for Better Street Design Alexander Walter 2014-05-28T14:04:00-04:00 >2014-06-03T23:03:24-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="386" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The Houston Chronicle called it a &ldquo;departure from what many consider the Houston model.&rdquo; City leaders in this Texas metropolis want to scale back the space for cars in the central city to make room for wider sidewalks and bike lanes. [...] Houston&rsquo;s wide, dangerous roads make it the seventh most-dangerous large city for pedestrians, according to last week&rsquo;s Dangerous by Design report from Smart Growth America.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> Shared Space and Slow Zones: Comparing Public Space in Paris and New York Alexander Walter 2014-05-27T13:34:00-04:00 >2014-06-02T22:24:56-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="386" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>At a larger scale, the metropolitan regions of Paris and New York City both show significant pedestrian mode shares. New York City has a pedestrian mode share of 34% for all trips citywide ahead of car (33%) and transit (30%)[4] when the Ile-de-France region has a weekday pedestrian mode share of 32%, a car mode share of 43%, and a public transport one up to 21%[5]. [...] How do they support this large pedestrian population and decrease auto-dominance in public space?</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html>