Archinect - News 2016-10-27T13:11:43-04:00 Join us this Saturday for Next Up: The L.A. River, ft. Mia Lehrer, Christopher Hawthorne and more! Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2016-10-26T12:57:00-04:00 >2016-10-26T17:34:43-04:00 <img src="" width="1200" height="926" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>The <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">L.A. River's redevelopment</a> is one of the most challenging, and exciting, projects currently underway in Los Angeles. Accounting for the River's 51-mile stretch, and all the neighborhoods it runs through, is a mammoth endeavor&mdash;and one that will necessarily involve contention and compromise. As a toast to this XXL project, Archinect is hosting <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><strong>Next Up: The LA River</strong></a>&mdash;a live podcasting interview event featuring perspectives from all along the river's edge.</p><p>On <strong>Saturday, October 29</strong> at the <strong>A+D Museum in Los Angeles</strong>, we'll be discussing the River and its redevelopment in a fast-paced format of quick interviews and panels, featuring the following:</p><ul><li><strong>Mia Lehrer</strong> (<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Mia Lehrer &amp; Associates</a>)</li><li><strong>Christopher Hawthorne</strong> (architecture critic for&nbsp;<em>Los Angeles Times</em>)</li><li><strong>Deborah Weintraub</strong> (Chief Deputy City Engineer Bureau of Engineering)</li><li><strong>Frances Anderton</strong> (Host of KCRW's Design and Architecture)</li><li><strong>Steven Appleton</strong> (LA River Kayak Safari)</li><li><strong>Marissa Christiansen</strong> (Friends of the LA River)</li><li><strong>Elizabeth Timme</strong> (<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">LA-M&aacute;s</a>)</li><li><strong>Renee Dake Wil...</strong></li></ul> Take a VR tour of the new L.A. Federal Courthouse, an “unusually polished work of civic architecture” Justine Testado 2016-10-25T20:01:00-04:00 >2016-10-27T12:09:14-04:00 <img src="" width="616" height="462" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The $350-million, 633,000-square-foot courthouse, designed by Skidmore, Owings &amp; Merrill, is an unusually polished work of civic architecture &mdash; especially by the standards of Los Angeles...This is a building that wants to look respectable and rational but not staid, one that is fairly conventional on the horizontal plane and takes a significant if measured chance on the vertical one. Still, it&rsquo;s a chance that pays off.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Christopher Hawthorne gives a thumbs up in his review of SOM's design for the now-completed Los Angeles U.S. Courthouse, which appears to &ldquo;float&rdquo; in mid-air. Don't forget to check out a virtual tour of the building in the video below.</p><p>Previously on Archinect:</p><p><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">LA Federal Courthouse under construction</a></p><p><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Skidmore, Owings &amp; Merrill to Design Federal Courthouse</a></p> Will Gehry's L.A. River plan result in water savings? Julia Ingalls 2016-08-04T12:53:00-04:00 >2016-08-10T00:36:54-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="276" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>For decades, the concrete-lined L.A. River has been more famous for being a bone-dry iconic conduit for films like <em>Terminator 2</em> than a major watery artery, but that may change: in a talk with Christopher Hawthorne on Monday, Frank Gehry mentioned that his design may just save the city significant amounts of cash when it comes to buying water. Per the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Hollywood Reporter</a>:</p><p><em>The river, which was bound in concrete beginning in the late 1930s after a series of damaging floods, is also frequently blamed for wasting water, one of Los Angeles&rsquo; most embattled resources. Because the river&rsquo;s concrete binding was designed to channel floodwaters swiftly into the ocean and away from properties on the banks, the city now loses more than 28.6 billion gallons of water a year, according to River L.A.,&nbsp;a nonprofit working with Gehry&rsquo;s firm and funded in part by the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy.</em></p><p><em>&ldquo;We think we can save the city one-third of what it now pays for imported water,&rdquo; Gehry said in conversati...</em></p> Christopher Hawthorne on the Republican National Convention's architecture: "It’s as if a bunch of mud-covered actors from 'Game of Thrones' or 'The Crucible' wandered into an Apple store." Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2016-07-21T13:04:00-04:00 >2016-07-21T18:56:23-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="345" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>the set is a shotgun marriage of Star Trek and Macbook modern, with perhaps a touch &mdash;&nbsp;in the rounded stairs, lighted from below &mdash;&nbsp;of Art Deco. [...] The goal seems to be a series of smooth surfaces to which none of the more direct ad hominem verbal attacks or accusations of plagiarism might stick &mdash; a slate that can be wiped clean whenever a change in tone or direction is wanted. Call it Teflon minimalism.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Hawthorne's Teflon comparison is particularly evocative, given one of the latest incidents last night at the RNC, when Ted Cruz didn't endorse Trump during his primetime address. He was booed off the stage.</p><p>The Republican National Convention's last day in Cleveland is today, themed "Make America One Again", with speakers Peter Thiel, Tom Barrack, Ivanka Trump and the one, the only, Republican presidential nominee, Donald Trump.</p><p>More News from the 2016 Presidential campaign:</p><ul><li><a title="Yeah, so about Melania Trump's architecture degree..." href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Yeah, so about Melania Trump's architecture degree...</a></li><li><a title="Hillary Clinton campaign ad highlights architect screwed by Trump" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Hillary Clinton campaign ad highlights architect screwed by Trump</a></li><li><a title="What does Donald Trump's architecture reveal about his politics?" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">What does Donald Trump's architecture reveal about his politics?</a></li></ul> Michael Maltzan proposes greening L.A.'s 134 freeway Julia Ingalls 2016-07-07T14:13:00-04:00 >2016-07-17T14:23:43-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="335" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Christopher Hawthorne, in keeping with <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">his exploration of the ever evolving urban identity of Los Angeles</a>, reached out via the L.A. Times to Michael Maltzan to see if the architect had any ideas about transforming L.A.'s freeways from noisy polluting agents into civic amenities. Maltzan has responded pro bono with an idea to place a 3/4 mile stretch of the 134 freeway into a tunnel which would not only reduce noise and annually absorb 516,000 tons of carbon dioxide, but double as a site for rooftop solar panels and <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">vegetation walls</a>.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Drivers in the tunnel would still be able to see their Pasadena surroundings through the lattice-like exterior, although residents near the just south of the Rose Bowl portion of the freeway would experience a significant traffic noise reduction thanks to the tunnel's acoustically insulated walls. As <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">the L.A. Times</a> notes, Michael Maltzan "describes the proposal, produced in collaboration with the Los Angeles office of the engineering firm Arup, as 'an env...</p> Is Aravena's Venice Biennale merely an expression of PC-culture? Nicholas Korody 2016-05-31T12:44:00-04:00 >2016-06-02T23:27:14-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="435" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Aravena&rsquo;s main show, though full of timely and meaningful projects, doesn&rsquo;t succeed terribly well strictly as an exhibition &mdash; as a sensory and visual experience on its own terms... In part this weakness may be explained by the quick time frame; it also seems to flow from Aravena&rsquo;s generous sensibility, his interest in opening his arms wide to the architecture of the moment and featuring a range of voices usually not heard in Venice. In that sense a desire for inclusion is his Achilles&rsquo; heel.</p></em><br /><br /><p><em>"Some architects &mdash; some architects left out of the show, that is &mdash; complained in Venice that what Aravena has produced is little more than a politically correct biennale [...]&nbsp;</em><em>Yet the tone is more tolerant and curious than strident or doctrinaire. Ultimately the PC charge is a caricature, a reflection mostly of the anxiety of a Western architectural elite realizing that its influence is waning even in Venice, the place it has long gathered every two years to toast itself."</em></p><p>More dispatches from&nbsp;<em>Reporting from the Front</em>:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Dispatch from the Venice Biennale: Mediterranean connections through the crisis</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Dispatch from the Venice Biennale: a couple of things that don&rsquo;t quite fit</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Dispatch from the Venice Biennale: 'Cool' kids and guerrilla interventions</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Dispatch from the Venice Biennale: Uruguay's underground, Germany's construction site, Britain's housekeeping and more from the national pavilions</a></li></ul> What comes next in the "Third Los Angeles"? Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2016-05-12T17:57:00-04:00 >2016-05-20T00:48:13-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="650" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>We&rsquo;re facing climate change, and our attitude about the natural world, natural resources has changed. What&rsquo;s really come to an end is this kind of frontier mentality about the city&mdash;this idea of infinite growth and infinite expansion, and that the way to study the city is to look at the edges, where it&rsquo;s gobbling up new territory. [...] This idea that we can grow our way out of any problem and that we&rsquo;re always a city that&rsquo;s expanding and finding or even colonizing new territory&mdash;that has ended.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Related on Archinect:</p><ul><li><a title="&quot;It looks like a dove. Or a carcass&quot;: Christopher Hawthorne on Calatrava's Transportation Hub" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">"It looks like a dove. Or a carcass": Christopher Hawthorne on Calatrava's Transportation Hub</a></li><li><a title="Turn the 2 into housing (or a park or a solar array): Christopher Hawthorne's pitch for one of LA's most awkward freeways" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Turn the 2 into housing (or a park or a solar array): Christopher Hawthorne's pitch for one of LA's most awkward freeways</a></li><li><a title="Christopher Hawthorne on repairing L.A.'s long-broken relationship with its freeways" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Christopher Hawthorne on repairing L.A.'s long-broken relationship with its freeways</a></li><li><a title="Christopher Hawthorne dissects Zumthor's inkblot with LACMA Director Michael Govan" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Christopher Hawthorne dissects Zumthor's inkblot with LACMA Director Michael Govan</a></li><li><a title='The Days of Infinite Thinking: What "City of Quartz" means for Los Angeles 25 years later' href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">The Days of Infinite Thinking: What "City of Quartz" means for Los Angeles 25 years later</a></li></ul> No guarantees for historic residential architecture in "real-estate limbo" Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2016-04-25T13:29:00-04:00 >2016-05-05T00:45:55-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="381" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Though the [Vanna Venturi] house has been nominated for the Philadelphia Register of Historic Places, Stecura said it is being sold without any protections against alterations inside or out. [...] Cross your fingers and hope for the best. [...] there is no broader strategy in place &mdash; in the museum world or among the nation's leading historic preservation groups &mdash; to protect the most important works of 20th-century residential architecture from the vagaries of the market</p></em><br /><br /><p>Related on Archinect:</p><ul><li><a title="The price of keeping Britain's 'Downton Abbeys' from crumbling" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">The price of keeping Britain's 'Downton Abbeys' from crumbling</a></li><li><a title="Le Corbusier's Cit&eacute; de Refuge in Paris to reopen after restoration" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Le Corbusier's Cit&eacute; de Refuge in Paris to reopen after restoration</a></li><li><a title="Chicago's Marina City designated official landmark status &mdash; it's about time!" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Chicago's Marina City designated official landmark status &mdash; it's about time!</a></li><li><a title="&quot;Stop the unpermitted demolition&quot;: Roche Dinkeloo's shiny UN Plaza Hotel lobby might be remodeled" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">"Stop the unpermitted demolition": Roche Dinkeloo's shiny UN Plaza Hotel lobby might be remodeled</a></li><li><a title="Brutalism's struggle to stay relevant: a few more buildings we lost in 2015" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Brutalism's struggle to stay relevant: a few more buildings we lost in 2015</a></li></ul> "It looks like a dove. Or a carcass": Christopher Hawthorne on Calatrava's Transportation Hub Nicholas Korody 2016-03-23T13:25:00-04:00 >2016-03-25T18:08:36-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="430" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey...has been so chastened by the cost overruns and construction delays that it declined to hold even a modest ribbon-cutting. When a bureaucracy turns down a major opportunity to pat itself on the back, you know things have turned sour. Turned acid, really. Still, everyone seems to agree that the main hall, which stretches beneath a glass and white-steel roof and which Calatrava calls the Oculus, is beautiful. But I didn't find it beautiful...</p></em><br /><br /><p><em>" least not in the way that Calatrava's finest work, fluid and precise, often is. I found it structurally overwrought and emotionally underwhelming, straining for higher meaning, eager to wring some last drops of mournful power from a site that is already crammed with official, semi-official and indirect memorials."</em><br><br>For related coverage of Santiago Calatrava's $4B "elaborate headstone in the crowded ground zero graveyard," as Hawthorne calls it, check out these links:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">$4 billion later, Calatrava's eye-candy transit hub opens</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Starchitect-Designed Public Projects Are Often Long Delayed and Way Over Budget</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Port Authority officially confirms March opening date for WTC Transportation Hub Oculus</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Leaking water delays opening of World Trade Center Transit Hub's luxury shopping mall</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Massive 'spine' skylight in Calatrava's WTC Oculus nears completion</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Calatrava: "I have been treated like a dog."</a></li></ul> Editor's Picks #443 Nam Henderson 2016-03-21T14:50:00-04:00 >2016-03-22T15:44:06-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="383" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Last month, as part of Archinect's special February theme, Furniture, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Nicholas Korody</a>&nbsp;profiled&nbsp;the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">work</a> of Brazilian designer Guto Requena,&nbsp;who is interested in "<em>digital interactive technologies</em>" and the concept of "<em>affective sustainability</em>".&nbsp;</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Later he <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">chatted</a>&nbsp;with Zoe Fisher, founder and curator of the Brooklyn design shop-cum-gallery <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Hand Job Gallery Store</a> (HJGS), "<em>on the occasion of the HJGS&rsquo; Lamp Show opening</em>".&nbsp;<strong>davvid</strong> felt compelled to offer up some praise "<em>really enjoying Nicholas's posts</em>" and others agreed.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><br><strong>News</strong><br>Christopher Hawthorne <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">considered</a> ambitious plans for two new public parks, in downtown LA. <strong><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">j</a>la-x</strong><strong> </strong>observed <em>"The ones done by the landscape archs for the Pershing redo are really good...the arch firms doing the other are too form driven and clunky...poor urban design</em>". <strong>Justavisual</strong> felt "<em>Architects should stop being invited to Landscape competitions. LA's don't sit around designing buildings and don't pretend to know anything about them...There are several practitioners who ...</em></p> A critical look at Downtown L.A.'s ambitious plans for two new public parks Justine Testado 2016-02-26T21:24:00-05:00 >2016-03-01T13:45:16-05:00 <img src="" width="650" height="366" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>One thing, though, is different this time around. These days the city and county are busy investing money and lavishing attention on public spaces across L.A. &mdash; and even producing some from scratch...In a range of ways, Southern California is beginning to make up for neglecting its public realm for the bulk of the postwar era.</p></em><br /><br /><p>With two park design competitions currently underway (linked below), Downtown L.A. is eager to boost its amount of green space. But will those ambitious plans pan out in a tricky cityscape?&nbsp;Christopher Hawthorne gives his two cents on the potential of each park.</p><p>Previously on Archinect:</p><p><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Take a look at these bold visions for Downtown LA's next park</a></p><p><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Pershing Square Renew competition narrows down to four finalist teams</a></p> Turn the 2 into housing (or a park or a solar array): Christopher Hawthorne's pitch for one of LA's most awkward freeways Nicholas Korody 2016-01-04T13:58:00-05:00 >2016-01-17T21:59:53-05:00 <img src="" width="650" height="428" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>An elevated park filling a retired stretch of freeway may sound reminiscent of the High Line, the hugely popular park built along an abandoned elevated train line in Manhattan. In symbolic and practical terms, the potential of a remade 2 spur is greater than even that project. It would take a working stretch of freeway in Los Angeles, a city still synonymous with car culture, and reinvent it as a vibrant, diverse urban landscape.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Critics rarely take advantage of their position to propose urban initiatives of their own, but when they do, it usually merits some serious consideration.<br><br>Christopher Hawthorne has issued an inventive, but well-reasoned, proposal to remake the awkward terminus of the 2 Freeway, where it "bends south and west from Interstate 5 and dips into Silver Lake and Echo Park, two miles or so from downtown Los Angeles," into a new urban space.</p><p>Noting the general feasibility of the idea &ndash; similar projects have had little to no harmful effect on traffic conditions &ndash; Hawthorne asserts that transforming the freeway could turn "noise into quiet, gray into green, dangerous into healthful, a no man's land into a destination."<br><br>Hawthorne proposes a variety of possible programs, from parkland to housing to storm water treatment (or all of the above), rather than prescribe a single idea. In the process, his call reads more as an invitation for designers than an edict.<br><br>He concludes by suggesting a glimmering ...</p> "A lean and sneakily ambitious show," Christopher Hawthorne reviews Wayne Thom's retrospective at WUHO Gallery Nicholas Korody 2015-11-17T13:59:00-05:00 >2015-11-18T23:13:14-05:00 <img src="" width="600" height="471" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>You're familiar with pretty much every phase of Julius Shulman's long career as an architectural photographer. You started following the globe-trotting Iwan Baan on Instagram way before he became a design-world celebrity. You can't recommend Ezra Stoller's black-and-white pictures of midcentury Manhattan highly enough. But Wayne Thom? The name may draw a blank.</p></em><br /><br /><p><img title="" alt="" src=""><br><br><img title="" alt="" src=""><br><br><img title="" alt="" src=""><br><br><img title="" alt="" src=""></p> Archinect's round-up of the week's architectural critiques Julia Ingalls 2015-09-16T13:36:00-04:00 >2015-09-16T13:41:03-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="433" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>What is the role of creative exploration in architecture? From the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">L.A. Times</a> to <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">The New Republic</a>, this question is very much on critical minds. In a piece entitled "How to Make Architecture Human," Anna Wiener reviews <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Witold Rybczynski</a>'s latest collection of essays, <em>Mysteries of the Mall</em>, which sets out to explore the "mundane" locales of architecture and quickly proclaims a distaste for the avant-garde in favor of lasting value.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Wiener notes that "Rybczynski is right to call out architects who submit designs for cities they have little relationship to, but work that favors experimentation&mdash;in aesthetics, in use, in design process&mdash;occupies a valuable space in the culture, too. 'Lasting value' is subjective and arbitrary; it serves a culture well to explore its desires and curiosities, however eccentric, and expand beyond the mainstream comfort-zone." Her review delves further into the problems of outdated and out of touch criticism: many of the essays contained in the book were origi...</p> Leading up to its September-20 opening, Christopher Hawthorne reviews the new Broad museum Alexander Walter 2015-08-31T14:15:00-04:00 >2015-08-31T14:21:40-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="432" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The elements of the Broad that have been most closely scrutinized or most often reworked, in fact, are the most uneven. It is only in the relative shadows &mdash; in the peripheral or easily overlooked spaces, or in the rooms added or enlarged late in the design process &mdash; that the architecture of the museum really comes to life.&nbsp;</p></em><br /><br /><p>More on <em>The Broad</em> on Archinect:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">What makes an artless museum?</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">So what's new at the Broad?</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">DS+R's Broad Museum set to open on Sept. 20, with a Feb. 15 preview</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Is The Broad Museum's newly unveiled facade living up to its renderings?</a></li></ul> Christopher Hawthorne on repairing L.A.'s long-broken relationship with its freeways Justine Testado 2015-08-07T20:27:00-04:00 >2016-06-11T22:01:10-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="435" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The truth is that Los Angeles, once a pioneer in defining the freeway&rsquo;s place in urban life, has fallen behind other cities. From Dallas to Paris to Seoul, the most innovative ideas about freeways and how they can be redesigned are coming from places far from Southern California. It&rsquo;s time for L.A. to catch up...</p></em><br /><br /><p>Following his recent review of the 405 Freeway expansion through the Sepulveda Pass, Christopher Hawthorne sums up why the time is ripe for Angelenos to refresh their perspectives on the city's freeways.</p><p>More on Archinect:</p><ul><li><a title="Archinect's critical round-up: the week's best architectural critiques so far" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Archinect's critical round-up: the week's best architectural critiques so far</a></li><li><a title="Ode to the Stack, Los Angeles's iconic infrastructure" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Ode to the Stack, Los Angeles's iconic infrastructure</a></li><li><a title="LA's Unbuilt Freeways" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">LA's Unbuilt Freeways</a></li><li><a title="Like It or Not, Most Urban Freeways Are Here to Stay" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Like It or Not, Most Urban Freeways Are Here to Stay</a></li><li><a title="405 Freeway closure exposes the limits of Los Angeles' mobility" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">405 Freeway closure exposes the limits of Los Angeles' mobility</a></li></ul> Archinect's critical round-up: the week's best architectural critiques so far Julia Ingalls 2015-08-06T17:48:00-04:00 >2015-08-09T10:32:45-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="423" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Over at the&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Los Angeles Times</a>, Christopher Hawthorne eloquently pans the new addition to the 405 freeway, noting that "The expanded 405 might be the first L.A. freeway project to look haggard and disjointed the day it opened." His review comes at a time when infrastructure, especially in California, is starting to (violently) show signs of its age: last year, the University of California Los Angeles briefly flooded thanks to an aged <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">water main</a>&nbsp;breaking, and in July a freak thunderstorm collapsed a portion of interstate 10. Hawthorne's displeasure is focused primarily on the 405's haphazard design to please multiple neighborhoods, its tacky soil-nail construction retaining walls ("This technique is something like the comb-over of freeway design"), and its simple underwhelming-ness as a public works project.</p><p>Meanwhile, James S. Russell's thoughtful examination of Thomas Heatherwick in the <a href=";emc=rss&amp;_r=2&amp;utm_content=bufferb2c3c&amp;utm_medium=social&amp;;utm_campaign=buffer" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">New York Times</a> delves into one of the perennially feisty debates of the architectural realm: just ...</p> Christopher Hawthorne on Chris Burden's 'architectural intelligence' Nicholas Korody 2015-05-12T14:04:00-04:00 >2015-05-18T20:45:40-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="366" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The fundamentally architectural character of "Urban Light" -- the artist called it "a building with a roof of light" -- was no anomaly for Burden, who grew up in France and Italy and studied at Pomona College and UC Irvine. Themes connected to architecture and urbanism run through his work, typically with the same wry attitude about the relationship between structure and art-making that the lampposts suggest. &ldquo;Originally I was going to study architecture,&rdquo; Burden said at a&nbsp; 2003.</p></em><br /><br /><p>The conceptual artist Chris Burden <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">died</a> two days ago at the age of 69.</p> Christopher Hawthorne remembers the LACMA that once was Alexander Walter 2015-04-16T17:42:00-04:00 >2015-04-20T20:31:43-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="308" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>As the museum turns 50 this year and debate continues about LACMA Director Michael Govan's plan to replace the Pereira buildings (and a later addition by Hugh Hardy) with a giant new wing by Swiss architect Peter Zumthor, it's worth remembering how the original LACMA campus was greeted &mdash; as well as a few things about the Los Angeles into which it was born.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Related:&nbsp;<a href="" target="_blank">Christopher Hawthorne dissects Zumthor's inkblot with LACMA Director Michael Govan</a></p> Christopher Hawthorne dissects Zumthor's inkblot with LACMA Director Michael Govan Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-03-28T09:02:00-04:00 >2016-08-11T15:56:01-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="867" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Since opening the doors of its original William Pereira buildings in 1965, the Los Angele County Museum of Art has grown along with its home. The version of the city beloved by Reyner Banham and Pereira was alive then on the historic Miracle Mile, proselytizing megasized car-infrastructure and New Suburban models of living. From the 1980s through the 2000s, the museum expanded and reorganized, adding Bruce Goff&rsquo;s Japanese Pavilion and Renzo Piano&rsquo;s additions. Now, the entire conglomerate is slated for a redesign, into a singular swath by famed museum architect Peter Zumthor, with new attention paid to an incoming Metro station. And according to the <em>Los Angeles Times&rsquo;</em> architecture critic, Christopher Hawthorne, this is distinctly on track with where the megaregion as a whole is going &ndash; part of his so-called &ldquo;Third Los Angeles&rdquo;.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>This third stage of Los Angeles is &ldquo;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">an altogether more integrated, metropolitan-oriented</a>&rdquo; place, and is the namesake for Hawthorne&rsquo;s ongoing lecture series exp...</p> Christoper Hawthorne on the recovery of public space in Los Angeles Alexander Walter 2015-03-26T21:12:00-04:00 >2015-04-05T00:03:06-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="488" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>"The public sector stopped making public space a long time ago," Los Angeles architect Jon Jerde told Wired magazine rather matter-of-factly in 1999. [...] A little more than two decades later, there is something quaintly fatalistic about Jerde's attitude toward the frail state of public space. In Los Angeles, at least, it has returned pretty dramatically to health.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> LACMA latest: Zumthor reins in his inkblot redesign Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-03-24T13:54:00-04:00 >2015-04-04T23:03:07-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="366" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Once a free-flowing, biomorphic design inspired by the La Brea Tar Pits and the work of the Brazilian architect Oscar Niemeyer, the design has become noticeably more angular and muscular in recent weeks. It now features double-height galleries made of white or light-gray concrete and poking up above the roofline of the rest of the museum [...] "No one will call it a blob anymore," LACMA Director Michael Govan said ... "Peter hasn't given up the curve. But he's really, really reined it in."</p></em><br /><br /><p>Related news:&nbsp;</p><ul><li><a title="Peter Zumthor pushes LACMA redesign to the curb to make room for tar pits" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Peter Zumthor pushes LACMA redesign to the curb to make room for tar pits</a></li><li><a title="L.A. County supervisors approve initial funding for new LACMA building" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">L.A. County supervisors approve initial funding for new LACMA building</a></li><li><a title="Peter Zumthor's $450,000,000 'Black Flower' for LACMA" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Peter Zumthor's $450,000,000 'Black Flower' for LACMA</a></li></ul> Christopher Hawthorne's "infatuation" with Toyo Ito Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-03-23T13:16:00-04:00 >2015-04-04T22:25:49-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="366" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>In an era when many architects are acclaimed for impressive rhetoric or jaw-dropping computer renderings &mdash; or both &mdash; [Ito] has earned his following in purely architectural terms. He knows how to build, to shape space in a way that respects traditional craftsmanship and seems utterly contemporary. [...] That odd and productive co-dependence of design and place, architect and site, is a relationship that doesn't really exist in any other art form.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> The Days of Infinite Thinking: What "City of Quartz" means for Los Angeles 25 years later Julia Ingalls 2015-03-10T20:19:00-04:00 >2015-03-12T02:12:38-04:00 <img src="" width="600" height="450" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>If you conceive of Los Angeles as having three distinct historical periods &ndash; as <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Christopher Hawthorne</a>, architecture critic for the<em> L.A. Times</em> and the driving force behind <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">The Third L.A.</a> series, does &ndash; then the first period encapsulated the 1880s to the 1940s, the second the 1940s to the new millennium, and the third from 2000 to now. It is this current period which The Third L.A. series situates itself. It's also the era which fascinates Hawthorne: specifically, his series investigates how the city's denizens are conceiving of and working toward creating an altogether more integrated, metropolitan-oriented Los Angeles. In partnership with southern California public radio station <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">KPCC</a> and <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Occidental College</a>, Hawthorne assembled Los Angeles Deputy Mayor Rick Cole, Occidental Art History Professor Amy Lyford, and fellow <em>L.A. Times</em> book critic David Ulin to discuss the influence on city politics and culture of Mike Davis' frothy, passionate, anti-booster classic<em> <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">City of Quartz</a></em>, a book w...</p> "The future is in the past" – Christopher Hawthorne looks at Architecture trends in 2014 Alexander Walter 2014-12-19T13:23:00-05:00 >2014-12-27T22:25:24-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="386" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>These were the words of the year in architecture: Basic. Fundamental. Primitive. Ancient. If fashion had normcore &mdash; the flaunting of a bland, practical and Gap-like aesthetic, the plain sweatshirt as statement of principles &mdash; architecture reset itself this year in an even more fascinating (if occasionally desperate) way. In a culture and an economy being dizzyingly remade by technology, architecture chose to embrace not the future, where architects [...] can seem superfluous, but the past.</p></em><br /><br /><p>For more Christopher Hawthorne listen to <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">episode 10 of Archinect Sessions</a>.</p> Powers of 10 with Christopher Hawthorne, architecture critic at the LA Times, on Archinect Sessions #10! Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2014-12-11T17:39:00-05:00 >2014-12-17T18:55:57-05:00 <img src="" width="650" height="421" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>How far we've come: this week, we're thrilled to have <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Christopher Hawthorne</a> on the podcast, architecture critic for the <em>Los Angeles Times</em>. Paul, Amelia, Donna and Ken talk with Christopher about his recent 3-part series on <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">architecture and immigration in southern California</a>, the role of the architecture critic at a major national newspaper, and his take on new media journalism.</p><p>We're also proud to introduce our inaugural bit with Archinect's lawyer-correspondent, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Brian Newman</a> at <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Dykema Gossett PLLC</a>, where we submit our architectural legal queries to an <em>actual lawyer. </em>And per usual, we check in on recent news, discussing the stormy marketing campaign for a <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Steampunk luxury condo building</a>.</p><p>And has it really already been ten episodes? To celebrate <strong>Archinect Sessions</strong>' rite-of-passage into double digits, we reflect on how it's been going so far &ndash; what we'd like to change, criticism we've received, and our favorite episodes.</p><p>Send your architectural legal questions, comments or questions abou...</p> Building an identity: Immigration and architecture in Southern California Alexander Walter 2014-12-02T14:25:00-05:00 >2014-12-03T22:06:31-05:00 <img src="" width="650" height="366" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>When Times architecture critic Christopher Hawthorne looks at L.A., he sees the city shaped by immigrants. Landmark buildings in Koreatown that adapt and evolve with a new generation. Houses in Arcadia that allow Chinese homeowners a proud, conspicuous place in a new country. Street life across the region that takes its cue from the way Latino neighborhoods blur the line between public and private.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> Editor's Picks #391 Nam Henderson 2014-10-30T23:30:00-04:00 >2014-12-03T11:59:28-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="303" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>In <strong>Screen/Print #26:</strong>&nbsp;an interview with&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Jessica Walsh, currently half of design firm</a><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"> Sagmeister &amp; Walsh</a><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">,</a><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">&nbsp;was excerpted</a>,&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">from the 2nd issue of&nbsp;</a><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Intern Magazine</a>&nbsp;(devoted to "intern culture" in the creative industries).</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><strong>&nbsp;Darkman</strong>&nbsp;was confused "<em>Strange choice to interview the most hated designer in the world for Intern magazine...She almost brags about not paying interns...Reads like PR I've already read</em>". Similarly&nbsp;<strong>Mr_Wiggin</strong>&nbsp;wrote "s<em>eems, to me, diametric to the message Intern Magazine should be publishing</em>".</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Malaysia-born Melbourne-based sculptor </a><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Daniel Dorall</a><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"> spoke with Archinect</a> for the latest installment of <strong>Working out of the Box</strong>. He finished up his Bachelor of Architecture at the University of Melbourne in 2005, as he explains that now</p><p>"<em>In a nutshell, I make miniature objects out of cardboard &ndash; it usually takes the form of the maze...creating walk through maze-installations</em>". <strong>midlander</strong> felt the work was "<em>Fantastic! Witty and meticulous</em>".<br>&nbsp;</p><p><strong>News</strong><br><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Anthony Morey</a>&nbsp;attended Acadia Conference of 20...</p> Michael Maltzan's One Santa Fe tries to make density appealing in Los Angeles Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2014-10-13T14:45:00-04:00 >2014-10-15T23:18:41-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="366" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>It is a fractal of contemporary Los Angeles architecture, the fragment that both contains and helps explain the whole. [...] What gives the $165-million project its unusual symbolic power is that it takes the generic stuff of a typical L.A. apartment building &mdash; a wood frame slathered in white stucco and lifted above a concrete parking deck &mdash; and expands it dramatically to urban scale. [...] The design takes banality and stretches it like taffy in the direction of monumentality.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> Renzo Piano admits he's "struggling to do something good" for the LA Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences project Archinect 2014-10-09T12:16:00-04:00 >2014-10-16T23:39:51-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="366" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>A few minutes after sitting down to talk with Renzo Piano in his large, airy Paris studio Tuesday, I asked the architect about the progress of the film museum he is designing for the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences on Wilshire Boulevard. "The academy?" he asked. "Ha. The academy is a good story. "Look, I know you don't like that scheme," referring to my recent coverage of the design. "I don't think it will be that bad. Actually, I'm struggling to do something good."</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html>