Archinect - News 2015-10-09T01:19:38-04:00 New Orleans deliberates how to dismantle statues of U.S. Confederate figures Justine Testado 2015-08-18T09:36:00-04:00 >2015-08-19T23:09:43-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="344" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The question of the monuments&rsquo; removal comes after several US states...have withdrawn the Confederate flag, acknowledging it as a symbol of racial hate...The [statues] are on public land 'which means that African American tax money is being used to maintain them', [says Carol Bebelle, co-chair of the Mayor&rsquo;s committee for racial reconciliation]. 'What does it mean to be a city that pays tribute to part of its history that was about oppressing the major portion of its population?'</p></em><br /><br /><p>More on Archinect:</p><p><a title="That new Texas Confederate Memorial on Martin Luther King Jr. Drive" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">That new Texas Confederate Memorial on Martin Luther King Jr. Drive</a></p><p><a title="Documentary to Explore Racial Discrimination in Transportation Planning" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Documentary to Explore Racial Discrimination in Transportation Planning</a></p><p><a title="Building the First Slavery Museum in America" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Building the First Slavery Museum in America</a></p> New Orleans public housing 10 years after Hurricane Katrina Alexander Walter 2015-06-22T20:39:00-04:00 >2015-06-22T20:44:01-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="342" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development embraced the trapezoid, dubbed Iberville-Treme, along with an exhaustive New Orleans plan that called for 2,314 apartments constructed within 54 months. Yet after 48 months &mdash; four years &mdash; the work in New Orleans is far from done. If construction continues at the same pace in coming years, the promised 2,314 apartments won&rsquo;t be complete until 2026.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> Building the First Slavery Museum in America Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-03-02T13:03:00-05:00 >2015-03-06T14:35:21-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="342" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Built largely in secret and under decidedly unorthodox circumstances, the Whitney [Plantation] had been turned into a museum dedicated to telling the story of slavery &mdash; the first of its kind in the United States. Located on land where slaves worked for more than a century, in a state where the sight of the Confederate flag is not uncommon, the results are both educational and visceral.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> Trahan Architects Release Short Film of Louisiana State Sports Hall of Fame and Regional History Museum cbryan 2015-02-24T13:35:00-05:00 >2015-02-26T21:54:32-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="386" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Spirit of Space</a>, in collaboration with <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Trahan Architects</a>, has created a short film featuring the award-winning design of the Louisiana State Sports Hall of Fame and Regional History Museum in Natchitoches, Louisiana. The museum was recently awarded the prestigious <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">2015 AIA Institute Honor Award</a> and will be honored at the upcoming <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">AIA National Convention</a> in Atlanta, Georgia.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><em>From Spirit of Space:</em></p><p>The Louisiana State Sports Hall of Fame and Regional History Museum, designed by Trahan Architects, evokes the past as much as it signals the future. Set in the oldest settlement in the Louisiana Purchase, the museum employs 21st century technology to execute a design language inspired by the carving and scouring of the nearby Cane River and the historic architecture of Natchitoches.&nbsp;</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>The film carries viewers past the historic district's references, around the pleated copper fa&ccedil;ade and into the sculpted interior.&nbsp; The cast stone panels define a fluid pathway that flows around, up and through th...</p> International architecture star Shigeru Ban is a Prospect.3 no show Alexander Walter 2014-11-11T14:40:00-05:00 >2014-11-11T14:42:06-05:00 <img src="" width="493" height="450" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Internationally renowned Japanese architect Shigeru Ban is one of the biggest names on the roster of New Orleans' international art festival, Prospect.3. But his exhibit at Longue Vue House and Gardens is a non-starter. [...] Unfortunately, whatever plans Ban had for presenting a structure or artwork at Prospect.3 must have fallen through, because the exhibit at Longue Vue is comprised of nothing more than a sleepy selection of miniature architectural models and photos.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> Louisiana is Disappearing into the Sea Nicholas Korody 2014-10-29T13:23:00-04:00 >2014-10-29T13:23:33-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="361" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The US state of Louisiana is slowly disappearing into the Gulf of Mexico as its fragile wetlands are eroded by rising sea levels. Approximately 75 square kilometres are lost each year and the US Geological Survey has warned that the entire habitat - which represents 40% of all wetlands in the US - could be destroyed within 200 years. The loss is partly down to natural evolutionary processes, but experts say human behaviour... has made the region more vulnerable to storm surges.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> Olafur Eliasson turns Louisiana MoMA into a 'Riverbed' Alexander Walter 2014-08-19T14:04:00-04:00 >2014-08-28T10:18:49-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="323" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Olafur Eliasson has tried something else. For his latest site-specific project, which opens on 20 August, the artist has transformed the entire south wing of the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art in Denmark into a convincing riverbed &ndash; a messy, stony accumulation of sedimentary rock and watery channels that threatens to silt up the white space of the gallery entirely. The result is an uncanny collision of manmade and natural views, and a Sublime reminder of the slow power of nature to erode [...].</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> Winners of the 2014 Great Places Awards to be exhibited at EDRA Conference, New Orleans Justine Testado 2014-05-19T20:11:00-04:00 >2014-05-19T20:11:17-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="342" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The annual Environmental Design Research Association (EDRA) Great Places Awards highlight the invaluable relationship between people and their experience with physical space. For its 2014 program, EDRA chose six winning projects that exemplify professional and scholarly excellence in environmental and experiential design.</p></em><br /><br /><p><strong>2014 Place Design Award: Masoro Village Project</strong> by GA Collaborative</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><strong>2014 Place Design Award: Open House</strong> by Matthew Mazzotta</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><strong>2014 Place Design Award: Sugar Beach </strong>by Claude Cormier et Associ&eacute;s</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><strong>2014 Place Planning Award: Pike-Pine Renaissance</strong> by <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Gustafson Guthrie Nichol</a></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><strong>2014 Place Research Award: Green Alley Demonstration Project</strong> by City of Austin, The University of Texas Center for Sustainable Development, the Guadalupe Neighborhood Development Corporation, and Austin Community Design and Development Center</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><strong>2014 Place Book Award: The Street: A Quintessential Social Public Space</strong> by Vikas Mehta</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>For project details, head over to <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Bustler</a>.</p> Eskew+Dumez+Ripple honored with 2014 AIA Architecture Firm Award Justine Testado 2013-12-13T12:58:00-05:00 >2013-12-16T12:27:45-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="386" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p> <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Eskew+Dumez+Ripple</a> was selected by the AIA Board of Directors to receive the 2014 AIA Architecture Firm Award. The AIA gives the award every year to a firm that has consistently created distinguished architecture for at least 10 years.</p> <p> Founded less than 25 years ago by Allen Eskew, FAIA, Steven Dumez, FAIA, and Mark Ripple, AIA, the New Orleans-based firm has become recognized for their deep involvement in rebuilding the Hurricane Katrina-stricken city as well as their commitment to mentorship -- for which they received two AIA National Intern Development Program (IDP) Firm Awards.<br><br> EDR is receiving the honor at a bittersweet time with the passing of principal Allen Eskew <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">earlier this week</a>.<br><br> You can read more about EDR below:</p> <p> <img alt="" src="" title=""><br><br> "Just eight years ago, when the city was struck by Hurricane Katrina, EDR had 22 employees, but has since nearly doubled and has taken on an important role as civic leaders charged with repairing the wounded urban fabric of the city. Their efforts, like...</p> A lost generation? Paul Petrunia 2011-04-20T12:35:17-04:00 >2011-11-24T09:05:52-05:00 <img src="" width="405" height="408" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Trey Trahan, principal of Trahan Architects, worries that architects who leave the industry for a period of time might struggle to keep up with technological advances in their field.</p></em><br /><br /><p> Business discusses the ongoing effects of the economic crisis for architects and others involved in the construction industries.<br><br><i>"There's a huge gap right now between older and younger architects," he says. "That middle group&mdash;the one that would take over the leadership of firms&mdash;just isn't there. There aren't as many of them around."</i></p>