Archinect - News 2014-10-01T04:18:43-04:00 http://archinect.com/news/article/108101742/wowza-scale-maps-of-barcelona-and-atlanta-show-the-waste-of-sprawl Wowza: Scale Maps of Barcelona and Atlanta Show the Waste of Sprawl Alexander Walter 2014-09-03T14:49:00-04:00 >2014-09-10T17:26:51-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/f1/f175888f16ed8c4fd83ca75be0b548a0.jpg" width="514" height="416" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Urban densities are not trivial, they severely limit the transport mode choice and change only very slowly. Because of the large differences in densities between Atlanta and Barcelona about the same length of metro line is accessible to 60% of the population in Barcelona but only 4% in Atlanta. The low density of Atlanta render this city improper for rail transit.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/loose.dtd"> <html><head><meta></head></html> http://archinect.com/news/article/103092958/a-new-mapping-tool-lets-nyc-residents-peek-into-developers-plans A New Mapping Tool Lets NYC Residents Peek Into Developers' Plans Alexander Walter 2014-06-30T13:38:00-04:00 >2014-06-30T13:41:27-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/08/08f30bb3b0bbd0087e57187ee401adbd.jpg" width="514" height="319" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The Municipal Art Society of New York has developed a new tool that shows where development could bring the most change across the city's five boroughs. This resource is a continuation of the group's "Accidental Skyline" initiative, an effort to curb the "as-of-right" development (which allows developers to bypass some regulatory hurdles) that has resulted in some of New York's tallest and skinniest new skyscrapers.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/loose.dtd"> <html><head><meta></head></html> http://archinect.com/news/article/100703463/animated-map-shows-america-s-love-of-shopping-malls-100-years-in-the-making Animated map shows America's love of shopping malls, 100 years in the making Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2014-05-30T12:56:00-04:00 >2014-06-03T23:00:26-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/46/46mx3sxpdu5y025c.jpg" width="514" height="346" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>[The American shopping mall] has its own traceable lineage, from the earliest planned shopping centers to the first regional hubs for shoppers traveling by car, to the novel post-war enclosed malls of Victor Gruen [...] Malls, in short, have spread across the American landscape -- and defined it -- with remarkable success, adapting to our changing tastes along the way.</p></em><br /><br /><p>The below animation shows the spread of shopping malls across the U.S. throughout the twentieth century, and was created by Sravani Vadlamani, a doctoral student in transportation engineering at Arizona State University. Including numbers of strip, outlet, indoor and outdoor malls, growth really starts to pick up in the 1950s.</p><p></p> http://archinect.com/news/article/78919440/buckminster-fuller-institute-selects-dymax-redux-winner Buckminster Fuller Institute Selects DYMAX REDUX Winner Alexander Walter 2013-08-07T16:57:00-04:00 >2013-08-14T04:24:18-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/b5/b543jhnuh5dhusfr.jpg" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Just a few days ago, we published the eleven finalists of DYMAX REDUX, an open call launched in April by the Buckminster Fuller Institute to create a new and inspiring interpretation of Buckminster Fuller's 1943 Dymaxion Map. Now the winning designs have been announced.</p></em><br /><br /><p> Previously: <a href="http://archinect.com/news/article/77675063/buckminster-fuller-institute-announces-dymax-redux-finalists" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Buckminster Fuller Institute Announces DYMAX REDUX Finalists</a></p> http://archinect.com/news/article/77675063/buckminster-fuller-institute-announces-dymax-redux-finalists Buckminster Fuller Institute Announces DYMAX REDUX Finalists Alexander Walter 2013-07-22T14:21:00-04:00 >2013-08-07T17:00:26-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/4k/4k7yx483r23b81hg.jpg" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The Buckminster Fuller Institute has unveiled the eleven finalists of DYMAX REDUX, an open call to create a new and inspiring interpretation of Buckminster Fuller's Dymaxion Map from 1943.</p></em><br /><br /><p> <strong>UPDATE:</strong> <a href="http://archinect.com/news/article/78919440/buckminster-fuller-institute-selects-dymax-redux-winner" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Buckminster Fuller Institute Selects DYMAX REDUX Winner</a></p> http://archinect.com/news/article/57206017/odd-things-happen-when-you-chop-up-cities-and-stack-them-sideways Odd Things Happen When You Chop Up Cities And Stack Them Sideways kaori walter 2012-09-13T16:12:00-04:00 >2012-09-17T19:38:49-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/20/20suop6qxa5ut9b5.jpg" width="514" height="352" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>It's not that I'm disappointed in New York, not at all. I love walking Manhattan's grid system, but now that I've seen Armelle Caron's bottom-up version of Istanbul, all those crooked, lopsided, curvaceous streets, going off in so many directions, I can't help wondering, what would it be like to wander there? Would I be constantly lost? Would every turn be an adventure? Suddenly I can't help it. I want to go.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/loose.dtd"> <html><head><meta></head></html> http://archinect.com/news/article/22064227/ahead-of-its-time-an-icon-goes-digital Ahead of Its Time | An Icon Goes Digital Alexander Walter 2011-09-28T20:14:26-04:00 >2011-11-24T09:05:52-05:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/84/84f80fe6ff74f428e7504c628b73f1f1.jpg" width="514" height="337" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>In 1972, Massimo Vignelli designed a diagrammatic map for the New York City subway. It was a radical departure. He replaced the serpentine maze of geographically accurate train routes with simple, bold bands of color that turned at 45- and 90-degree angles. [...] Its abstract representation of the routes was elegant but flawed. To make the map function effectively, a few geographic liberties were taken, something that didn&rsquo;t sit well with New Yorkers.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/loose.dtd"> <html><head><meta></head></html>