Archinect - News 2014-04-24T02:48:46-04:00 http://archinect.com/news/article/98067795/monu-20-on-geographical-urbanism-released MONU #20 on Geographical Urbanism Released MAGAZINEONURBANISM 2014-04-15T14:00:00-04:00 >2014-04-21T20:38:18-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/o6/o6yasyu4hybym0uy.jpg" width="514" height="692" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Contrary to the simplified linear causality of the environmentalism of the past, which posited that natural geography shapes urban patterns, it is now thought that contemporary urbanization shapes the surface of the earth. Nikos Katsikis explains this tremendous current shift in the meaning of physical geography for cities in his contribution "On the Geographical Organization of World Urbanization". (Bernd Upmeyer, Editor-in-Chief, April 2014)</p></em><br /><br /><p>Contrary to the simplified linear causality of the environmentalism of the past, which posited that natural geography shapes urban patterns, it is now thought that contemporary urbanization shapes the surface of the earth. <strong><em>Nikos Katsikis</em></strong> explains this tremendous current shift in the meaning of physical geography for cities in his contribution <strong>"On the Geographical Organization of World Urbanization"</strong>, putting the discussion of the <strong>20th</strong> issue of <strong>MONU</strong> on the topic <strong><em>"Geographical Urbanism"</em></strong> in a historical context. For <strong><em>Bernardo Secchi</em></strong> this is not much of a problem as he is no fan of natural geography anyway, a position he reveals in our interview with him entitled <strong>"Working with Geography"</strong>. According to him our task today is to understand, and to learn from, natural geography, but to correct and improve it and design useful projects of artificial geography. What is important to him - and which is the reason why he considers physical geography the starting point of all his ideas on planning ...</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/92796304/editor-s-picks-353 Editor's Picks #353 Nam Henderson 2014-02-05T14:37:00-05:00 >2014-02-05T21:31:03-05:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/lw/lw7ccxuif7xx8c7v.jpg" width="514" height="303" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>For the latest edition of <a href="http://archinect.com/features/tag/1149/working-out-of-the-box" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Working out of the Box</a>,&nbsp;Archinect <a href="http://archinect.com/features/article/92243101/working-out-of-the-box-miguel-mckelvey" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">talked with Miguel McKelvey, Co-Founder &amp; Chief Creative Officer at </a><a href="http://wework.com/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">WeWork</a>.&nbsp;He just so happened to study architecture at University of Oregon with Paul Petrunia, Archinect's founder!</p><p>Mr. McKelvey explains "<em>I have applied what I learned in architecture to pretty much every aspect of building a business - and for the right person, I would make the argument that architecture is a better preparation for being an entrepreneur than business school is</em>".</p><p><img title="" alt="" src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/o7/o7qgk0h3tu4g1j0b.jpg"></p><p>Meanwhile edition #6 of <a href="http://archinect.com/features/tag/354209/screen-print" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Screen/Print </a>an experiment in translation across media, highlights <a href="http://archinect.com/features/article/91708100/screen-print-6-monu-s-greater-urbanism" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">MONU's 19th issue, Greater Urbanism</a>.</p><p><strong>News</strong></p><p><img title="" alt="" src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/6i/6id7eg6c7jl7jdqi.jpg"><br>Archinect contributors / <a href="http://archinect.com/schools/cover/87291/parsons-the-new-school-for-design" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Parsons</a><a href="http://archinect.com/news/article/92379152/elizabeth-diller-moma-discuss-expansion-and-folk-museum-s-demolition-with-slice-of-ny-architectural-community" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"> MArch students </a><a href="http://archinect.com/ayeshaghosh" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Ayesha Ghosh</a><a href="http://archinect.com/news/article/92379152/elizabeth-diller-moma-discuss-expansion-and-folk-museum-s-demolition-with-slice-of-ny-architectural-community" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"> and Alex Stewart attended a panel discussion regarding MoMA expansion and Folk Museum demolition</a>. The event was hosted jointly by the <a href="http://archleague.org/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Architectural League</a>, the <a href="http://mas.org/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Municipal Art Society</a>, and the <a href="http://main.aiany.org/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">AIA's New York chapter</a>&nbsp;and everyone in the audience missed the State of the Union address.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/up/uppm5fupxtq0xg8o.jpg"></p><p>Ayesha and Alex...</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/85519425/new-call-for-submissions-for-mono-20-geographical-urbanism New Call for Submissions for MONO #20 - Geographical Urbanism MAGAZINEONURBANISM 2013-11-01T14:11:00-04:00 >2013-11-01T17:37:49-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/n8/n8qmlcfecjcky9fp.jpg" width="471" height="375" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Could geography, by which we mean the physical geography and in particular the natural geographical features such as landforms, terrain types, or bodies of water that are largely defined by their surface form and location in the landscape, be the last hope of the planet's ever expanding, continuously transforming, and increasingly identical and indefinable urban territories to remain distinguishable and to gain a particular identity in the future?</p></em><br /><br /><p> NEW CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS FOR MONU #20 - GEOGRAPHICAL URBANISM</p> <p> Could geography, by which we mean the physical geography and in particular the natural geographical features such as landforms, terrain types, or bodies of water that are largely defined by their surface form and location in the landscape, be the last hope of the planet's ever expanding, continuously transforming, and increasingly identical and indefinable urban territories to remain distinguishable and to gain a particular identity in the future? Do hills, cliffs, valleys, rivers, oceans, seas, lakes, streams, canals, or any other kind of geographical feature have the power, in an ever more globalized world in which progressively cities and their architecture look the same, to provide meaning and significance to places, their inhabitants, and users or will all such elements only contribute to an identity that is merely like a mantra as Rem Koolhaas predicted once in "The Generic City"?</p> <p> For the French architect and ...</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/84213160/monu-19-on-greater-urbanism-released MONU #19 on Greater Urbanism released MAGAZINEONURBANISM 2013-10-15T15:44:00-04:00 >2013-10-15T15:45:14-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/hn/hnyjsiciitrovd5m.jpg" width="514" height="694" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>It appears that cities of today, and especially big cities, all around the world, are all struggling with similar problems, as they all have developed huge territories - their metropolitan or "greater" areas - during the twentieth century that cannot be properly understood by anyone in terms of their form, but that now need to be recognized as something that truly exists, because it is a form that is in perpetual transformation and without limits.</p></em><br /><br /><p> It appears that cities of today, and especially big cities, all around the world, are all struggling with similar problems, as they all have developed huge territories - their metropolitan or "greater" areas - during the twentieth century that cannot be properly understood by anyone in terms of their form, but that now need to be recognized as something that truly exists, because it is a form that is in perpetual transformation and without limits.This is where Antoine Grumbach sees the main difficulty when it comes to "Greater Urbanism" as he explains in an interview with us entitled "Unlimited Greatness". In such unlimited spaces infrastructure plays without doubt a crucial role constructing a connected geography and reconfiguring new urban morphologies, as Fabrizia Berlingieri and Manuela Triggianese argue in their piece "From Utopia to Real World - Construction of a Unique Metropolitan Space of Europe". But a metropolitan strategy that focuses exclusively on mass transport rema...</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/73217945/new-call-for-submissions-for-monu-19-greater-urbanism NEW CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS FOR MONU #19 - GREATER URBANISM MAGAZINEONURBANISM 2013-05-15T11:36:00-04:00 >2013-05-21T18:06:46-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/0n/0n86xxk199718h99.jpg" width="514" height="307" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Are cities becoming "greater" these days? (Bernd Upmeyer, Editor-in-Chief, May 2013)</p></em><br /><br /><p> Are cities becoming "greater" these days? When two years ago, in our 14th issue of MONU Magazine entitled "Editing Urbanism", we claimed that in the Western world, the need for new buildings and city districts was decreasing or even ceasing to exist altogether due to demographic changes and financially difficult times, we did not believe in all those new, big-scale, and long-term urban development strategies for the metropolitan areas of certain European cities that were being proposed at the time. The growth numbers that plans such as "Greater Helsinki" envisioned for the year 2050, trying to brand the city as one of the most dynamic metropolises in Europe, predicting a population growth from 1.3 million to 2 million, were too exuberant and too vast. However, other European cities, such as Paris, seem to be changing substantially within their metropolitan areas, their "greater" areas. Paris needs to build 70.000 new housing units per year. Mainly because of such requirements, but...</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/60801947/editor-s-picks-288 Editor's Picks #288 Nam Henderson 2012-11-05T23:50:00-05:00 >2012-11-26T19:05:52-05:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/5i/5ig4pob14l2z64va.jpg" width="514" height="773" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p> In 2012, <a href="http://archinect.com/features/article/60584804/student-works-drx-2012-minimal-surface-highrise-structures" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">the DRX (The Design Research Exchange a non-profit residency program for researchers hosted by HENN Architekten) took place in Berlin from July 16th, 2012 through September 7th, 2012</a>. Participants included four invited DRX Experts and eight invited DRX Researchers all of whom focused on the topic Minimal Surface Highrise Structures. As part of the DRX 2012, three prototypic 500m (1,640ft) tall Highrise Structures were developed as so-called ProtoTowers.</p> <p> The latest edition of the <strong>Working out of the Box</strong> series <a href="http://archinect.com/features/article/60372984/working-out-of-the-box-skip-schwartz" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">features Skip Schwartz</a> who is currently the CEO of a heath care service/technology company that provides primary healthcare to people mostly on a virtual basis.&nbsp; The two main lessons that he gained from architecture school and the architecture industry were that "<em>Design counts</em>" and "<em>Project management counts</em>".</p> <p> <br><strong>News</strong><br> The world lost three very talented architects last week including, <a href="http://archinect.com/news/article/60369458/lebbeus-woods-dead-at-72" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Lebbeus Woods</a> dead at 72, <a href="http://archinect.com/news/article/60245032/john-m-johansen-last-of-harvard-five-architects-dies-at-96" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">John M. Johansen</a> the last surviving member of the Harvard...</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/59418045/monu-17-on-next-urbanism-released MONU #17 ON NEXT URBANISM RELEASED MAGAZINEONURBANISM 2012-10-16T11:50:00-04:00 >2012-10-21T17:16:12-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/5j/5jh9zasegarc8r53.jpg" width="514" height="694" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Next to interviews with Saskia Sassen and with the Nigerian-born architect Kunl&eacute; Adeyemi, and a series of contributions that discuss Next Urbanism in general, we feature eleven articles that focus specifically on the cities of each of the Next Eleven countries.</p></em><br /><br /><p> This new issue of MONU is dedicated entirely to the topic of "Next Urbanism" - meaning the urbanism of the cities of the so-called "Next Eleven" or "N-11", which include eleven countries: Bangladesh, Egypt, Indonesia, Iran, Mexico, Nigeria, Pakistan, the Philippines, Turkey, South Korea, and Vietnam. These countries have been identified as growing into, along with the BRICs - Brazil, Russia, India, and China - the world's largest economies in the 21st century. Next to interviews with Saskia Sassen and with the Nigerian-born architect Kunl&eacute; Adeyemi, and a series of contributions that discuss Next Urbanism in general, we feature eleven articles that focus specifically on the cities of each of the Next Eleven countries. The issue opens with an article entitled "Santa Fe-ing the World" by Joel Garreau, who envisions the future of the Next Urbanism as being organized in dramatically different settlement patterns that feature widely dispersed new aggregations, made possible by new infor...</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/55264927/the-ideology-of-publication-conversation-with-bernd-upmeyer The Ideology of Publication / Conversation with Bernd Upmeyer croixe 2012-08-14T13:09:00-04:00 >2012-08-20T20:57:14-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/5l/5l5bzkpp103d6ckr.jpg" width="514" height="694" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p> <strong>Urbanism is one of those malleable concepts that defy definition. A flexible subject where, by trying to lock it within a specific scope, its validity sometimes gets undermined and its potential spoiled.</strong></p> <p> <strong>But when a magazine develops and maintains its own way to portray the multiple faces, forms, shapes, relationships, arguments, contradictions, images, consequences, and messages of the discipline that is supposed to carry the unbearable load of thinking the city, then the exercise of defining urbanism becomes an enriching intellectual journey.</strong></p> <p> <strong><a href="http://www.monu-magazine.com/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">MONU</a> (Magazine on Urbanism) was born in 2004 in Rotterdam. What was originally an almost underground magazine made available through a pdf dossier and a stapled black and white print has evolved into one of the main independent publications, a reference for the collective intelligence of urbanism, and an icon of exquisite aesthetics.</strong></p> <p> <img alt="" src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/1p/1pbt1ip43utc27fp.jpg" title=""></p> <p> <strong>Set to satisfy a growing urbanophilic hunger, MONU has thrown into the mix an intoxicating mixture o...</strong></p> http://archinect.com/news/article/50544911/non-urbanism-by-brett-milligan Non-Urbanism by Brett Milligan MAGAZINEONURBANISM 2012-06-07T12:44:00-04:00 >2012-06-07T14:11:52-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/56/56v29ncxpems5fp7.jpg" width="514" height="429" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>&ldquo;If you go into the hardcore urban or the hardcore rural, it is quite simple to define it, but that is not so relevant. It is more significant to talk about the condition in between. And this condition is extremely difficult to define.&rdquo; &ndash; Urban planner Kees Christiaanse in conversation with Bernd Upmeyer and Beatriz Ramo on behalf of MONU Magazine</p></em><br /><br /><p> MONU&rsquo;s call for submissions for its latest issue (#16, Non Urbanism) asked its participants to &ldquo;investigate how non-urbanism may be defined and identified today, and how non-urban areas interact with and relate to urban areas.&ldquo;&nbsp; Fortunately for readers, the printed compendium seems to succeed in largely refuting the very existence of its themed subject matter.&nbsp; Or, if it doesn&rsquo;t go so far as to refute the &lsquo;non urban&rsquo;, the content demonstrates how difficult it is to call out any place as not being deeply under the influence of it.</p> <p> MONU #16&rsquo;s agenda fits within mounting reactions to the geographic myopia found in some of the contemporary &lsquo;urban age&rsquo; rhetoric.&nbsp; &lsquo;Non Urbanism&rsquo; explores what happens when the inventory of urban moves beyond widget counts of human bodies for its reductive definition.&nbsp; It asks: what is non-urbanism when we approach the &lsquo;built environment&rsquo; in a fully relational way?&nbsp; What happens when we see cities in the wider geographic field of their effects, borrowin...</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/41548701/monu-15-post-ideological-urbanism-review-by-michael-hirschbichler MONU #15 "Post-Ideological Urbanism" - Review by Michael Hirschbichler Archinect 2012-03-15T21:05:00-04:00 >2012-03-19T15:34:51-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/4k/4k7jnsi2un8tyuzn.jpg" width="514" height="708" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p> In its latest issue #15 Rotterdam-based MONU magazine set out on a daring journey to investigate, as chief editor Bernd Upmeyer proclaims, &ldquo;one of the most fascinating and biggest issues of our time and in culture, or what is left of it: the non-ideological &ndash; or better post-ideological &ndash; conditions of our society when it comes to cities.&rdquo; At a time when the news is full of reports on breathtaking riots erupting in European cities, revolutionary chain reactions and their cruel suppression in the Arabic world, the rejuvenation and continuation of the world&rsquo;s most isolated and propagandistically charged dictatorial empire in Asia, among many others, assuming a post-ideological condition might seem contradictory. Now even more than in recent history, ideological battles are being fought and their physical and violent revolutionary implementation transforms the reality of many urban territories. How can it be that, when it comes to urbanism, the non-ideological and post-ideological gai...</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/35817669/do-we-simply-have-to-stop-having-sex DO WE SIMPLY HAVE TO STOP HAVING SEX...? MAGAZINEONURBANISM 2012-01-26T04:14:00-05:00 >2012-01-29T11:02:46-05:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/5w/5wj5l6fvxm8jd1im.jpg" width="437" height="375" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>In August 2009 the editorial of MONU #11 on the topic of "Clean Urbanism" started with the lines "Do we simply have to stop having sex to produce Clean Urbanism..."</p></em><br /><br /><p> These lines are now featured on a bag designed and produced by MONU Magazine. The bags were produced in a limited edition of 50 pieces. To get a bag please e-mail your order to <a href="mailto:bag@monu-magazine.com" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">bag@monu-magazine.com</a> .</p> <p> Text on MONU Bag:<em> "Do we simply have to stop having sex to produce Clean Urbanism - i.e. an urbanism that is dedicated to minimizing both the required inputs of energy, water, and food for a city as well as its waste output of heat, air pollution as CO2, methan, and water pollution, Samo Pedersen asks in his piece &ldquo;Sci-fi greenery..or just Responsibility?&rdquo;. In fact Randall Teal sees the growing world population frequently ignored in discussions on sustainability, as he points out in his article &ldquo;Coming Clean: Owning Up to the Real Demands of a Sustainable Existence&rdquo;. Fewer people spend less energy, and as the gas and oil supply will come to an end sooner or later, saving energy may be a cheaper and smarter solution for cities than depending on renewable energies, as Gerd Hauser, on...</em></p> http://archinect.com/news/article/29024088/post-card-ideological-icons Post(card) Ideological Icons croixe 2011-11-28T05:14:00-05:00 >2012-12-02T13:09:32-05:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/xl/xlsf4xutzryv0io3.jpg" width="514" height="363" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p> <strong>What about revisiting the hardcore shapes of the avant-garde?</strong></p> <p> It has been almost a century since the air was heavily saturated with the combustible gas of ideology. Almost a hundred years have passed since everything from film, through art and architecture, to urbanism was susceptible to the slightest friction in the atmosphere sparking endless manifestoes and multiple visions of the perennial &ldquo;new beginning&rdquo;. But what happens when the ideological fire that fuels urbanism is extinguished, and in its place just smoke remains? What is left after the idealistic energy of the avant-garde has vanished and we are left with necrophilic icons of dead ideologies? Why aren&rsquo;t we able to see the striking similarities and contrasting disparities between the avatars of yesterday&rsquo;s ideological urbanism and today&rsquo;s pop-architectural icons?<br><br> In the twenties imaginary taut wires, steel trusses, and structural concrete gave form to the muscular monuments of a <em>Potemkinesque</em> avant-garde.&nbsp; Utopia had...</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/7323300/monu-14-review-editing-urbanism-by-brendan-cormier MONU #14 Review: Editing Urbanism by Brendan Cormier MAGAZINEONURBANISM 2011-05-23T04:55:35-04:00 >2011-05-23T12:51:54-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/pe/pe9ynj13dp5nrhv9.jpg" width="514" height="412" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>On a more general note, I feel it necessary to stress the valuable role that MONU has played in the past few years, specifically for the architecture and urbanism community. As the biggest (to my knowledge) indie publication focused explicitly on urbanism, MONU has provided a voice for many emerging young professionals &mdash; a chance to be published and have their ideas heard in print format.</p></em><br /><br /><p> The latest issue of MONU Magazine &mdash; an independent biannual publication devoted to writings on urbanism &mdash; has hit newsstands. Always theme-based, this particular issue centres on the idea of &lsquo;Editing Urbanism&rsquo;.</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> When the term was first raised in MONU&rsquo;s call for proposals, I immediately thought of the kind of editing that involved addition &mdash; small-scale, clandestine changes to the urban environment that often get reported about on The Pop-Up City. Instead much of the focus on &lsquo;Urban Editing&rsquo; is not about addition but about what not to delete &mdash; or in more familiar terms, preservation, renovation and adaptive re-use.</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> Along these lines, the issue features an interview with UNION3 &mdash; a collective of architects devoted to preservation projects in Rotterdam (perhaps the least preservation-oriented city in Europe), a look at OMA&rsquo;s UNESCO-busting exhibit CRONOCAOS, and STAR&rsquo;s own manifesto against the preservation crusade that is increasingly occupying a significant portion of&nbsp; t...</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/4934363/new-call-for-submissions-for-monu-15-post-ideological-urbanism NEW CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS FOR MONU #15 - POST-IDEOLOGICAL URBANISM MAGAZINEONURBANISM 2011-05-02T11:27:00-04:00 >2011-05-03T07:23:40-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/lw/lweba2xm9gfhqdgw.jpg" width="502" height="375" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>MONU - magazine on urbanism has released its new call for submissions for MONU #15 on the topic of Post-Ideological Urbanism</p></em><br /><br /><p> Today we find ourselves in a jealous mood, yet at the same time disillusioned, looking back to the times when revolutionary urban ideologies were not only conceived but actually, unlike today, also truly believed in. Just think about the passionate ideas of the Situationist International, who tried to overthrow the advanced capitalist society in the late 1950s and 1960s. Guy Debord, one of its founding members, argued in 1967 that spectacular features such as mass media and advertising play a central role in an advanced capitalist society, presenting us with a fake reality in order to mask the actual capitalist degradation of human life. This issue of MONU is not supposed to celebrate Marxism, our society should not make that mistake again, but at present we find ourselves once again surrounded and confronted by innumerable fake realities and hypocritical urban ideologies such as Green Urbanism or Neo-Urban Socialism, to name but a few. Conceived with the best of intentions, they ...</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/3441317/monu-14-on-editing-urbanism-released MONU #14 ON EDITING URBANISM RELEASED MAGAZINEONURBANISM 2011-04-19T11:53:34-04:00 >2011-04-19T12:03:25-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/02/02itzkje893dlmj3.jpg" width="514" height="694" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>MONU is one of the leading independent architecture magazines published today, bringing together challenging themes with interesting architecture writers and theorists. It is excellent and deserves to be read by anyone interested in urban issues.</p></em><br /><br /><p> MONU - magazine on urbanism has published its 14th issue featuring among others contributions by Rem Koolhaas/OMA and Adolfo Natalini/ Superstudio on the topic of Editing Urbanism</p> <p> (Rotterdam, April 19, 2011) MONU's 14th issue features contributions by UNION3, Felix Madrazo, Alexander Sverdlov, Marieke Kums, Arman Akdogan, Anastassia Smirnova, Henk Ovink, Simone Pizzagalli, OMA, Rem Koolhaas, Ippolito Pestellini, Beatriz Ramo, Lucas Dean, Jarrik Ouburg, Sara Hendren, Sean Burkholder, Adolfo Natalini, Bernd Upmeyer, STAR strategies + architecture, Marinke Steenhuis, Paul Meurs, Jan Bovelet, Miodrag Kuc, Ephraim Joris, Michiel van Iersel, Juha van 't Zelfde, Ben Cerveny, Gijs Hoofs, Michiel Daalmans, Brian Davis, Rob Holmes, Brett Milligan, Patrizia Di Monte, Floris Alkemade, Adriaan Geuze, Jaap van den Bout, and Piet Vollaard.</p> <p> <br> Despite the current urgency to deal with the enormous potential of the already existing urban material as Urban Editors, there seems still to be an enor...</p>