Archinect - News 2014-09-20T03:59:08-04:00 http://archinect.com/news/article/86067567/rem-koolhaas-ai-weiwei-superflex-and-others-take-part-in-gwangju-folly-project Rem Koolhaas, Ai Weiwei, Superflex and others take part in Gwangju Folly Project Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2013-11-08T15:09:00-05:00 >2013-12-27T13:25:19-05:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/c4/c46hqurusry6n75v.jpg" width="514" height="740" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p> Architectural follies impose on our assumptions of what architecture is and what it should be -- what is function, what is beauty, where do private and public space meet.&nbsp;<a href="http://www.gwangjubiennale.org/eng/folly/intro/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Gwangju Folly II</a>, part of the <a href="http://www.gwangjubiennale.org/eng/intro/greeting/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Gwangju Biennale Foundation</a>, highlights the politicization of public space through multiple folly-interventions in Gwangju. The project includes follies by Ai Weiwei, Rem Koolhaas and Ingo Niermann, Superflex, Raqs Media Collective, David Adjaye and Taiye Selasi, among others, this November 10-11.</p> <p> Artistic Director Nikolaus Hirsch, with curators Philipp Misselwitz and Eui Young Chun, focus the follies on the contentiousness of public space, and its operation on the global scale. Positioned throughout the city, some follies are mobile (Ai Weiwei's "Cubic-meter Food Cart", a rumination on South Korea's <em>pojangmachas</em>) while others highly site-specific (Rem Koolhaas and Ingo Niermann's "The Vote" is installed in a high-traffic commercial area).</p> <p> As the setting for <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gwangju_massacre" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Gwangju&rsquo;s Democratic ...</a></p> http://archinect.com/news/article/20906520/networks-of-surrender-exhibition-at-2011-gwangju-design-biennale "Networks of surrender" exhibition at 2011 Gwangju Design Biennale David Burns 2011-09-18T19:58:30-04:00 >2011-11-24T09:05:52-05:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/6i/6iamrb76fp2nz53d.jpg" width="514" height="514" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Over twenty architects, designers, philosophers and photographers across Sydney have participated in a series of creative conversations, which transform the image of this harbour city from generic postcard perfection to a set of multiplicitous, individual urban narratives. These are networks of surrender, whose ambition is not the cohesion of a finished, consumerable product, but the construction of new communities for creative work.</p></em><br /><br /><p> "Networks of surrender" sits in the &lsquo;Communities&rsquo; sub-section of the 2011 Gwangju Design Biennale alongside four other invited cities: Johannesburg, Macau, Medell&iacute;n, and Tel Aviv-Jaffa. The exhibition is a collaboration between three practitioners/academics Samantha Spurr, David Burns and Adrian Lahoud from the Design Architecture &amp; Building Faculty of the University of Technology Sydney, and Nicole Bearman, a cultural programs producer, also based at the Powerhouse Museum in Sydney.</p>