Archinect - News 2015-11-26T05:51:10-05:00 London Garden Bridge will track visitors' phone signals, submitted plan says Alexander Walter 2015-11-11T04:00:00-05:00 >2015-11-11T12:16:07-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="340" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Visitors to the garden bridge in London will be tracked by their mobile phone signals and supervised by staff with powers to take people&rsquo;s names and addresses and confiscate and destroy banned items, including kites and musical instruments, according to a planning document. [...] Caroline Pidgeon [...] said she feared the bridge was following &ldquo;a worrying trend of the privatisation of public places, where the rights of private owners trump those of ordinary people&rdquo;.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Previously on Archinect:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">London Garden Bridge wins new supporters with revised funding deal</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Further legal setbacks for London Garden Bridge</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Cheeky "A Folly for London" winners announced</a></li></ul> 11th annual "Parking Day" transforms parking spaces into public spaces Julia Ingalls 2015-09-18T00:04:00-04:00 >2015-09-29T00:02:58-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="386" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>In 2005, the now defunct Rebar placed coins in a <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">San Francisco</a> parking meter not to park a car but to erect a small public park. Every third Friday in September since then, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">activists worldwide</a> who wish to foster a conversation about the lack of public space have been transforming parking spaces into everything from greenery to art installations to places for wedding ceremonies. This September 18th, potential participants are encouraged to download the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Parking Day Manifesto</a>, which is a how-to-guide on transforming that slab of asphalt into an engaging <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">public space</a>.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p> New restrictions on public space in England and Wales could make "unusual or unpopular" behavior criminal Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-09-08T18:02:00-04:00 >2015-09-08T18:02:42-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="308" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Public Space Protection Orders, or PSPOs, came into existence last year under the Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014. Similar to the much-derided anti-social behaviour orders (asbos), PSPOs allow for broad powers to criminalise behaviour that is not normally criminal. But where asbos were directed at individuals, PSPOs are geographically defined, making predefined activities within a mapped area prosecutable.</p></em><br /><br /><p>For a primer to this piece, check out:</p><ul><li><a title="Taking a stand against privately-owned public spaces" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Taking a stand against privately-owned public spaces</a></li></ul><p>And for more on contested public spaces:</p><ul><li><a title="Christoper Hawthorne on the recovery of public space in Los Angeles" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Christopher Hawthorne on the recovery of public space in Los Angeles</a></li><li><a title="Locals welcome The 606, a.k.a. Chicago's &quot;High Line&quot;, but anxiety for its future remains" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Locals welcome The 606, a.k.a. Chicago's "High Line", but anxiety for its future remains</a></li><li><a title="Not all sidewalks are created equal in D.C." href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Not all sidewalks are created equal in D.C.</a></li></ul> Google Street View captures beautiful public space transformations Julia Ingalls 2015-09-02T20:02:00-04:00 >2015-09-04T14:16:19-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="489" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>A Brazilian urban planning collective called Urb-i...scoured Google Street View images to find the most stunning public space transformations from around the world. The results give us hope that our cities are becoming more beautiful places to live.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Cheer up: not everything is getting worse, at least not if you check out these comparison shots of real places from around the globe captured on <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Google Street View</a>. Compiled by Urb-i, these 41 intersections and urban streets are studies in <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">pedestrian-friendliness</a>; as the years melt by, many of the municipalities and cities strip away traffic lanes and replace them with sidewalk planters, pavers, and other traffic-calming elements. In some cases, cars are removed entirely, letting people (and greenery) retake the streets. Here's a view of&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Hungary</a>:</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>A street in <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Detroit</a>:</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Also in <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Montreal</a>:</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p> NY Mayor de Blasio's Times Square overhaul runs into massive opposition Alexander Walter 2015-08-24T11:27:00-04:00 >2015-08-25T19:09:15-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="289" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>It&rsquo;s hard to grasp his calculus. One of Mr. de Blasio&rsquo;s big initiatives, Vision Zero, aims to improve pedestrian safety. Ripping up the pedestrian plazas in Times Square, restoring cars and forcing millions of people to dodge traffic again, runs headlong into his own policy. As an exasperated Tim Tompkins, the president of the Times Square Alliance, put it on Thursday: &ldquo;Sure, let&rsquo;s tear up Broadway &mdash; we can&rsquo;t govern, manage or police our public spaces.&rdquo;</p></em><br /><br /><p>More about Times Square on Archinect:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Times Square throughout the ages</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Times Square and the routine of chaos</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Jam to your heart's desire with Stereotank's "Heartbeat" installation in Times Square</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Midtown Manhattan Wouldn't Be the Same</a></li></ul> MIT's "Placelet" sensors technologize old-fashioned observation methods for placemaking Justine Testado 2015-08-18T19:49:00-04:00 >2015-08-19T11:55:27-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>With a $35,000 grant from the Knight Prototype Fund, [MITs Elizabeth Christoforetti] and her team are working on a project called Placelet, which will track how pedestrians move through a particular space. They&rsquo;re developing a network of sensors that will track the scale and speed of pedestrians [and vehicles] over long periods of time. The sensors, [currently being tested in downtown Boston], will also track the 'sensory experience' by recording the noise level and air quality of that space.</p></em><br /><br /><p>More on Archinect:</p><p><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">The Life of a New Architect: Elizabeth Christoforetti</a>&nbsp;(Featured interview)</p><p><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">MIT's MindRider helmet draws mental maps as you bike</a></p><p><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">MIT's Newest Invention Fits All the Furniture You Need in One Closet-Sized Box</a></p><p><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">MIT develops self-assembling modular robots</a></p> Taking a stand against privately-owned public spaces Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-08-04T12:52:00-04:00 >2015-08-09T21:35:51-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="309" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>the place where cities get &ldquo;remade&rdquo; is in the public rather than private sphere. Part of the problem, then, with privately owned public spaces (&ldquo;Pops&rdquo;) ... is that the rights of the citizens using them are severely hemmed in. [...] [Pops] feel too monitored, too controlled, to allow this communal activity to simply unfold. London, and many other cities, are failing miserably to enable diversity in people&rsquo;s engagement with such spaces.</p></em><br /><br /><p>More news from the public space:</p><ul><li><a title="Urban design influences how public protests can take root" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Urban design influences how public protests can take root</a></li><li><a title="Christoper Hawthorne on the recovery of public space in Los Angeles" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Christopher Hawthorne on the recovery of public space in Los Angeles</a></li><li><a title="Locals welcome The 606, a.k.a. Chicago's &quot;High Line&quot;, but anxiety for its future remains" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Locals welcome The 606, a.k.a. Chicago's "High Line", but anxiety for its future remains</a></li><li><a title="Not all sidewalks are created equal in D.C." href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Not all sidewalks are created equal in D.C.</a></li></ul> Downtown Portland says hello to new student-designed public parklet Justine Testado 2015-07-09T15:01:00-04:00 >2015-07-09T18:09:38-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="342" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The first public parklet in downtown Portland, the installation is intended to help revitalize this stretch of SW Fourth Avenue in the heart of the SoMa EcoDistrict (for &ldquo;South of Market Street&rdquo;), giving students, faculty, and workers from surrounding offices a place to sit and enjoy their food-cart lunches in the sunshine, rather than racing back to their desks to eat.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Downtown Portland is no stranger to green public spaces, but the recently opened Fourth Avenue Parklet has that ideal recipe for a do-good-feel-good collaborative project. Twenty-six architecture students from Portland State University spent 18 months to design and construct the parklet, which also crowdsourced $15,640 in cash and in-kind donations from the local community.</p><p>The new parklet flaunts 3,475 pounds of steel, 250 feet of repurposed escalator handrail, 768 linear feet of sustainably harvested juniper, and drought-resistant native plants. It was built as a complementary hangout spot for people to relax and enjoy their grub from the nearby diners and food-cart pod along&nbsp;SW Fourth Avenue in Portland's SoMa EcoDistrict.</p><p>Keep doing you, Portland.</p><p><em>Image <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">via</a>.</em></p> Trust for Public Land initiative will soon bring greener alleys to L.A. Justine Testado 2015-07-03T19:03:00-04:00 >2015-07-05T00:43:28-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="384" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>If the project is scaled up, it could have a substantial impact on the urban fabric: Los Angeles has a total of almost 900 miles of alleys, roughly the length of the coast of California. Proponents believe that on a citywide scale, green alleys could act as significant rainwater sponges, mitigate the heat island effect, and reduce vehicle use, as well as bring social and health benefits to nearby residents.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Tori Kjer, a program director of the Trust for Public Land, and her colleagues won support from local South L.A. communities for their proposed Avalon Green Alley Network Plan, which will transform the city's alleyways into more community-friendly spaces for playing and for bike and walking routes. The plan will start with the renovation of two alleys early next year.</p> Locals welcome The 606, a.k.a. Chicago's "High Line", but anxiety for its future remains Justine Testado 2015-06-10T10:15:00-04:00 >2015-06-15T22:17:14-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="332" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Chicago's highly anticipated elevated trail and park system known as The 606, otherwise referred to as the Bloomingdale Trail or the "Chicago High Line", finally celebrated its grand opening this past Saturday on the appropriate date of June 6 (6/06). The centerpiece of the $95 million project&nbsp;&mdash; which had its first phase designed by&nbsp;ARUP, Carol Ross Barney, Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates, Burns &amp; McDonnell, and the Chicago Public Art Group &mdash; is a 2.7 mile elevated trail that replaces the defunct Bloomingdale rail line. The trail will connect the Wicker Park, Bucktown, Humboldt Park, and Logan Square neighborhoods and six parks. And unlike similar linear-park projects, The 606 is open to pedestrians and cyclists to use as a new "transit corridor".</p><p>Prior to The 606, those communities were historically divided by the Bloomingdale railway and were in need of open green space. The newly opened trail is still looking fairly sparse at the moment, but later phases of the project include ...</p> Not all sidewalks are created equal in D.C. Alexander Walter 2015-05-26T15:59:00-04:00 >2015-06-01T22:51:59-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Instead, he lives on Buena Vista Terrace SE, a grim stretch of low-rise apartments pushed up against the Maryland border. And on Buena Vista Terrace, just standing outside can get you in trouble. [...] The law is meant to fight disorderly conduct, but some lawyers and the people arrested for the &ldquo;crime&rdquo; say it&rsquo;s routinely used to harass people seen as undesirable: protesters, the homeless, and black men.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> Architecture of paranoia Alexander Walter 2015-04-22T21:19:00-04:00 >2015-04-28T21:35:41-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="308" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Since terrorism has become one of the guiding forces in urban design, the incorporation of immense fortifications into everyday streets has spawned an entire industry of defensive architecture [...] The latest developments in this rising tide of urban paranoia are on display this week at the Counter Terror Expo in west London&rsquo;s Olympia, a sprawling trade show that proudly claims to showcase &ldquo;the key terror threat areas under one roof&rdquo;. It is an enormous supermarket of neuroses [...].</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> Heart of the Community program selects six new cities to receive placemaking grants Alexander Walter 2015-04-22T13:11:00-04:00 >2015-04-28T21:36:20-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>This morning, Southwest Airlines announced that non-profit organizations in six U.S. cities will receive Placemaking grants to help them reimagine and reactivate important but underutilized public spaces in their city. [...] Albuquerque, New Mexico: Civic Plaza Ft. Myers, Florida: Lee County Regional Library Jacksonville, Florida: Hemming Park Milwaukee, Wisconsin: 4th &amp; Wisconsin Area Portland, Maine: Congress Square Park St. Louis, Missouri: Strauss Park</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> Three teams left to compete for St. Petersburg Pier redesign Justine Testado 2015-04-15T19:11:00-04:00 >2015-04-16T13:55:44-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="171" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Just three proposals left in the second attempt of the St. Petersburg Pier design competition in St. Petersburg, Florida. Back in 2012, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">"The Lens"</a> by Michael Maltzan Architecture and Tom Leader Studio won the original competition, but that design was kicked to the curb after local group <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Concerned Citizens of St. Pete</a> fiercely <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">opposed</a> it -- mostly because it eliminated the pier's iconic <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">inverted pyramid</a> that was built in 1973. The group's request to preserve the pyramid became a requirement for RFQ #2.</p><p>A final shortlist of seven new proposals was revealed last December. The Pier Selection Committee convened on March 20 to discuss each proposal, and then narrowed down the list to the following three proposals and their current designs:</p><p><strong>ALMA by Alfonso Architects</strong><br><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Original proposal</a>.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""><img title="" alt="" src=""><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><strong>Destination St. Pete Pier by St. Pete Design Group</strong><br><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Original proposal</a>.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""><img title="" alt="" src=""><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><strong>The Pier Park by Rogers Partners Architects+Urban Designers, ASD, Ken Smith</strong><br><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Original proposal</a>.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""><img title="" alt="" src=""><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Each team is now preparing responses to an additio...</p> Curbing violence through better architecture Alexander Walter 2015-04-01T13:50:00-04:00 >2015-04-01T13:52:33-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="290" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Alastair Graham hopes Violence Prevention Through Urban Upgrading, an initiative of the government of Cape Town, South Africa, will end better. He calls the effort, which has been revamping areas around train stations since 2006, part of &ldquo;a package of potential solutions &hellip; either improving safety, or improving socioeconomic situation, or improving quality of life.&rdquo; The project is aimed at curbing violence by augmenting the public spaces in which violent crime frequently occurs [...].</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> Christoper Hawthorne on the recovery of public space in Los Angeles Alexander Walter 2015-03-26T21:12:00-04:00 >2015-04-05T00:03:06-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="386" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>"The public sector stopped making public space a long time ago," Los Angeles architect Jon Jerde told Wired magazine rather matter-of-factly in 1999. [...] A little more than two decades later, there is something quaintly fatalistic about Jerde's attitude toward the frail state of public space. In Los Angeles, at least, it has returned pretty dramatically to health.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> FRCH Design Worldwide upgrades Zaha Hadid's Contemporary Arts Center lobby in Cincinnati Justine Testado 2015-03-23T17:40:00-04:00 >2015-04-04T22:35:15-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="336" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>After moving a few times in Cincinnati throughout the later half of the 20th century, the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Contemporary Arts Center</a> relocated into its current home at the Lois &amp; Richard Rosenthal Center for Contemporary Arts in 2003. Designed by Zaha Hadid, who won the commission in the late 1990s, the building is the first U.S. contemporary art institution designed by a woman. Shortly after the building opened, Herbert Muschamp of The New York Times hailed the building as "the most important American building to be completed since the end of the Cold War.&rdquo; The non-collecting museum has housed temporary exhibitions, installations, and performances.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Hadid envisioned the CAC building as an "urban carpet" that draws in pedestrians to experience the interior space by walking on a gently sloping meandering path. Aiming to connect the building's monochromatic exterior with its "playful" interior, FRCH added a cafe, lounge, and seating area in hopes to create a livelier and welcoming lobby for visitors. "We...</p> Alicia Eler's ode to Jon Jerde and the mall as "part of the American experience" Alexander Walter 2015-02-23T13:49:00-05:00 >2015-02-24T21:57:58-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="364" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>I love the mall as much as I love the urban walking experience, museums and movie theaters. Today the stripmall is not just a part of my everyday life in Los Angeles [...] it is also a memory from my own suburban adolescence growing up in Illinois. Jon Jerde, the LA architect both celebrated and loathed for his role in spreading shopping malls across US suburbia, died this month. Some might scoff at his life&rsquo;s achievement. I am not one of them.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Previously:&nbsp;<a href="" target="_blank">Jon Jerde, founder and chairman of The Jerde Partnership, has died</a></p> Times Square and the routine of chaos Alexander Walter 2015-02-19T19:38:00-05:00 >2015-02-26T21:16:20-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="344" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Times Square runs on spectacle. Bigger and brighter is always better. And though plenty of New Yorkers wear their criticism of Times Square as a badge of local honor [...] one of the most iconic public spaces in the world. In recent years, as stretches of Broadway formerly open to vehicular traffic have been repurposed as pedestrian plazas, opportunities to activate the &ldquo;crossroads of the world&rdquo; with events, performances, and public art installations have ballooned.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> Urban design influences how public protests can take root Archinect 2014-12-29T19:34:00-05:00 >2015-01-05T18:24:33-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="386" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>NYC has been the focal point for recurrent demonstrations over the last couple of weeks, with large, long marches, die-ins and rallies. This is not surprising, since NYC is the most populous city in the country. But even more than that, the urban environment &mdash; dense, centralized, vertical, walkable &mdash; creates spaces that are conducive for these protests to pick up steam. The existence of public spaces, such as Union Square and Washington Square Park, function as easily accessible rallying points.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> 50 years of gentrification: will all our cities turn into 'deathly' Canberra? Alexander Walter 2014-12-12T13:22:00-05:00 >2014-12-14T09:35:30-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="308" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The Economist Intelligence Unit puts Melbourne in first place, followed by Vienna, Vancouver, Toronto, Adelaide and Calgary. There is never any mention, on any list, of London or New York, Paris or Hong Kong. There are no liveable cities where you might actually want to live. [...] Liveability, it seems, is defined by a total absence of risk or chance, pleasure or surprise. It is an index of comfort, a guide to places where you can go safe in the knowledge you&rsquo;ll never be far from a Starbucks.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> “Serra Gate” salutes to Taksim Square protests in Istanbul, will tour city next year Justine Testado 2014-11-24T18:37:00-05:00 >2014-11-26T23:34:58-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="362" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Nodding to the Taksim Square political protests in May 2013, the Serra Gate installation by Istanbul practice GAD Architecture artistically interprets and also invites passers-by to examine the influence of urban interventions in the public realm. Serra Gate, which was inspired by the large-scale sculptures of artist Richard Serra, highlights how protesters created makeshift living spaces inside the park and the streets...</p></em><br /><br /><p><img title="" alt="" src=""><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Learn more about the project on <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Bustler</a>.</p> London's Garden Bridge: not so public after all Alexander Walter 2014-11-19T14:30:00-05:00 >2014-11-20T20:37:19-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="340" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>[...] the bridge will be closed at night, won't allow entry to cyclists or groups of 8 or more without prior booking, and will ocassionally be closed off for fundraising events. Right. So less a public bridge than a privately-managed tourist attraction, then. [...] The east of London, on the other hand, could actually use another crossing, with or without limits to access</p></em><br /><br /><p>Previously:&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">London's Garden bridge: 'It feels like we're trying to pull off a crime'</a></p> Refugees Reshape Their Camp, at the Risk of Feeling at Home Alexander Walter 2014-09-10T14:38:00-04:00 >2014-09-10T19:10:10-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Public space like the plaza in Al Fawwar is mostly unheard-of in Palestinian camps across the West Bank. Architectural upgrades raise fundamental questions about the Palestinian identity, implying permanence, which refugees here have opposed for generations. [...] Camps were conceived as temporary quarters. The absence of public space was then preserved over the years to fortify residents&rsquo; self-identification as refugees, displaced and stateless.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> The Cheesegrater – a tower of no small ambition Alexander Walter 2014-08-25T13:40:00-04:00 >2014-08-27T18:13:54-04:00 <img src="" width="460" height="652" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Someone has told the bouncers to be nice. It is now standard for architectural anoraks like myself to find ourselves challenged by smile-less security as we go about our blameless business &ndash; no loitering, no photography, no looking, as if al-Qaida scouts would do their dastardly work in this way or as if, years after the invention of the camera phone, photography can be controlled as it could in the age of the tripod. But not at the base of the Cheesegrater.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> Have a seat at the "Urban Reef" installation in downtown Vancouver, Canada Justine Testado 2014-08-12T18:52:00-04:00 >2014-08-18T21:06:56-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Meandering down a section of Robson Street on the iconic 800 block in downtown Vancouver, passers-by can sit, relax, play, and socialize on the "Urban Reef" installation. Designed by Kaz Bremner and Jeremiah Deutscher with local furniture collective Higher Works, Urban Reef won the inaugural VIVA Vancouver: Robson Redux design-build competition out of 78 submissions worldwide.</p></em><br /><br /><p>The competition had entrants create a temporary urban installation to transform the block to a welcoming public plaza from Canada Day (July 1) until Labor Day (September 1).</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""><img title="" alt="" src=""><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>More details on <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Bustler</a>.</p><p>Check out a timelapse video and the making-of teaser below.</p> Ateliers Jean Nouvel + PTW Architects’ award-winning One Central Park in Sydney, Australia Justine Testado 2014-07-15T15:21:00-04:00 >2014-07-22T18:02:32-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="469" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Designed by a renowned team of Parisian Ateliers Jean Nouvel in collaboration with Australian firm PTW Architects, One Central Park in downtown Sydney has received some high recognition in just the past few weeks alone.</p></em><br /><br /><p>The project was recently named the Best Tall Building for the Asia + Australia region in <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">CTBUH's 2014 Best Tall Buildings</a>, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">shortlisted in the World Architecture Festival Awards</a>, and received a Commendation in the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">NSW Architecture Awards 2014</a>.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>More info on <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Bustler</a>.</p> The Architecture Of Abortion: How Providers Build Their Own Buffer Zones Alexander Walter 2014-07-03T13:19:00-04:00 >2014-07-09T17:46:32-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="289" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>If women can&rsquo;t always rely on legislation to support their cause, could they rely on architects? [...] Brown says it&rsquo;s time for the design community to take a stand on women&rsquo;s reproductive rights. &ldquo;Architects have to become more politically engaged in our built environment.&rdquo; To that end, Brown is helping organize a design competition that will rethink a privacy fence for Mississippi&rsquo;s only abortion clinic.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Previously:</p><ul><li><p><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Debating abortion rights and free speech on the sidewalk</a></p></li><li><p><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">The Architecture of Abortion Clinics</a></p></li></ul> Debating abortion rights and free speech on the sidewalk Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2014-06-26T12:39:00-04:00 >2014-07-02T17:52:43-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="297" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The Supreme Court on Thursday unanimously struck down a Massachusetts law that barred protests near abortion clinics. The law, enacted in 2007, created 35-foot buffer zones around entrances to abortion clinics. State officials said the law was a response to a history of harassment and violence at abortion clinics in Massachusetts, including a shooting rampage at two facilities in 1994. The law was challenged on First Amendment grounds by opponents of abortion</p></em><br /><br /><p>Massachusett's 35-foot buffer zone was initially enacted as a defensive mechanism, responding to a history of harassments and violence around clinics' entrances. The law had previously barred <em>anyone</em>&nbsp;from entering a fixed buffer zone around entrances to reproductive health care facilities (excepting those simply passing through, clinic employees, or those intentionally going in and out of the building). Plaintiffs in the recent Supreme Court case effectively argued that those exceptions were biased towards supporters of abortion rights.</p><p>More on the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">architecture of abortion clinics</a>.</p> Shared Space and Slow Zones: Comparing Public Space in Paris and New York Alexander Walter 2014-05-27T13:34:00-04:00 >2014-06-02T22:24:56-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="386" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>At a larger scale, the metropolitan regions of Paris and New York City both show significant pedestrian mode shares. New York City has a pedestrian mode share of 34% for all trips citywide ahead of car (33%) and transit (30%)[4] when the Ile-de-France region has a weekday pedestrian mode share of 32%, a car mode share of 43%, and a public transport one up to 21%[5]. [...] How do they support this large pedestrian population and decrease auto-dominance in public space?</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html>