Archinect - News 2014-10-21T16:03:37-04:00 http://archinect.com/news/article/104937987/medell-n-made-urban-escalators-famous-but-have-they-had-any-impact MedellĂ­n made urban escalators famous, but have they had any impact? Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2014-07-24T12:50:00-04:00 >2014-07-28T22:22:41-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/62/62201c98423eac9c80c955cd686936d1.jpg" width="514" height="286" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Medell&iacute;n has gained much attention for its urban transformation &mdash; and the escalators, which won several international prizes for innovation, make up one of the most striking projects. [...] But are the escalators making any real economic or social impact in the neighborhood? To find out, I spent three months in Medell&iacute;n talking with people in Comuna 13 about what has and hasn&rsquo;t changed here.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/loose.dtd"> <html><head><meta></head></html> http://archinect.com/news/article/103322774/the-architecture-of-abortion-how-providers-build-their-own-buffer-zones The Architecture Of Abortion: How Providers Build Their Own Buffer Zones Alexander Walter 2014-07-03T13:19:00-04:00 >2014-07-09T17:46:32-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/d5/d577a2a69d10321c7983e51ebac285a5.jpg" width="514" height="289" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>If women can&rsquo;t always rely on legislation to support their cause, could they rely on architects? [...] Brown says it&rsquo;s time for the design community to take a stand on women&rsquo;s reproductive rights. &ldquo;Architects have to become more politically engaged in our built environment.&rdquo; To that end, Brown is helping organize a design competition that will rethink a privacy fence for Mississippi&rsquo;s only abortion clinic.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Previously:</p><ul><li><p><a href="http://archinect.com/news/article/102781417/debating-abortion-rights-and-free-speech-on-the-sidewalk" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Debating abortion rights and free speech on the sidewalk</a></p></li><li><p><a href="http://archinect.com/news/article/94425539/the-architecture-of-abortion-clinics" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">The Architecture of Abortion Clinics</a></p></li></ul> http://archinect.com/news/article/102781417/debating-abortion-rights-and-free-speech-on-the-sidewalk Debating abortion rights and free speech on the sidewalk Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2014-06-26T12:39:00-04:00 >2014-07-02T17:52:43-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/92/92a3912ac8d8af2cfc34498505191951.jpg" width="514" height="297" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The Supreme Court on Thursday unanimously struck down a Massachusetts law that barred protests near abortion clinics. The law, enacted in 2007, created 35-foot buffer zones around entrances to abortion clinics. State officials said the law was a response to a history of harassment and violence at abortion clinics in Massachusetts, including a shooting rampage at two facilities in 1994. The law was challenged on First Amendment grounds by opponents of abortion</p></em><br /><br /><p>Massachusett's 35-foot buffer zone was initially enacted as a defensive mechanism, responding to a history of harassments and violence around clinics' entrances. The law had previously barred <em>anyone</em>&nbsp;from entering a fixed buffer zone around entrances to reproductive health care facilities (excepting those simply passing through, clinic employees, or those intentionally going in and out of the building). Plaintiffs in the recent Supreme Court case effectively argued that those exceptions were biased towards supporters of abortion rights.</p><p>More on the <a href="http://archinect.com/news/article/94425539/the-architecture-of-abortion-clinics" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">architecture of abortion clinics</a>.</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/98969373/net-neutrality-lives-on-in-santa-monica-california Net Neutrality lives on in Santa Monica, California Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2014-04-30T18:40:00-04:00 >2014-05-06T22:38:55-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/02/02b8d20f8323a74f42990fc3ea066810.jpg" width="500" height="375" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>[Santa Monica will] be able to offer its residents real net neutrality, which the [FCC] is working on rolling back for just about everyone else in the US. [...] Santa Monica has cleverly and quietly been installing its own network of city-owned fiber-optic cables for years, and they intend to keep the net neutral. [...] Santa Monica has also made about $5 million providing internet service and leasing out the cables to other providers, and their competition has driven down rates.</p></em><br /><br /><p>The Federal Communications Commission&nbsp;<a href="http://www.theverge.com/2014/2/19/5425808/fcc-chair-announces-plan-for-new-net-neutrality-rules" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">recently proposed</a> that internet service providers (like Verizon, AT&amp;T, and Time Warner Cable) should be able to charge companies extra for faster service -- so for example, Netflix could pay AT&amp;T more to ensure faster download speeds for its viewers. This would violate <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Net_neutrality" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">net neutrality</a>, the concept that aims to ensure that every companies' data on the internet is treated (and delivered) equally. Under the FCC's proposal, larger companies would be able to make their content more accessible to users, handicapping smaller companies from the get-go.</p><p>But what if your internet service provider wasn't AT&amp;T or Verizon, but your own city? Should city governments hold the reins of internet service, and ultimately net neutrality? It's not only a question of download speeds for the user, but of how local governments could use internet traffic data to change their city.&nbsp;If the internet were treated like a local utility, then perhaps city governments could more ...</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/91832887/protected-bike-lanes-strengthen-city-economy-report-finds Protected bike lanes strengthen city economy, report finds Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2014-01-22T13:07:00-05:00 >2014-01-27T21:46:07-05:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/2u/2u6j4iqlx5mp18aj.jpg" width="514" height="672" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p> According to a recent <a href="http://b.3cdn.net/bikes/123e6305136c85cf56_0tm6vjeuo.pdf" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">report</a> from <a href="http://www.peopleforbikes.org/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">PeopleForBikes</a> and <a href="http://www.peoplepoweredmovement.org/site/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Alliance for Biking &amp; Walking</a>, protected city bike lanes can actually encourage local business success. As trends show workers moving into U.S. cities (rather than out into suburbs), and businesses catering to a younger workforce that relies less on cars, cycling infrastructure has becomes integral to strengthening local businesses and encouraging long-term economic growth for the entire city.</p> <p> A lot of what delays cycling infrastructure is the presumption that it only benefits cyclists. It can be hard to justify to citizens who don't cycle that bike lanes and bike-share programs will benefit the city at large, and not just the "cyclist" demographic. But cities have begun to take notice of the positive change that cycling infrastructure can help bring to their local businesses, in very concrete ways.</p> <p> <img alt="" src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/o7/o7e3k4sw259uvss0.jpg" title=""></p> <p> The report focuses on statistics from cities with expanding networks of protected bike lanes: Austin, TX; San Francisco, CA;...</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/88755037/parsons-and-the-met-team-up-to-increase-accessibility-for-disabled Parsons and the Met team up to increase accessibility for disabled Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2013-12-13T14:40:00-05:00 >2013-12-16T19:24:21-05:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/d7/d7pyl0r91mpu0kpk.jpg" width="514" height="288" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p> As virtual access to art collections expands through online walk-throughs and projects like Google&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.google.com/opengallery" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Open Gallery</a>, museums have long been experimenting within their own halls with ways to accommodate a wider range of visitors,&nbsp;particularly those with disabilities. Historically, <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/27/arts/artsspecial/welcoming-art-lovers-with-disabilities.html?_r=0" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">museums have been leaders in the field of accessible institutional design</a>, whether through improvised additions or new technology. In a collaboration between the <a href="http://www.metmuseum.org/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Metropolitan Museum of Art</a> and Parsons The New School for Design, students in the <a href="http://amt.parsons.edu/%E2%80%8E" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">School of Art, Media, and Technology</a> have focused on how both physical and online resources can optimize the museum experience for people with disabilities.</p> <p> Working under the <a href="http://www.newschool.edu/parsons/mfa-design-technology/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Design and Technology masters program</a> and alongside education specialists at the Met, Parsons&rsquo; students spent the last semester designing a host of physical and digital tools to not only make museum resources more accessible, but to serve and benefit the public at large. Their work, including a...</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/88213328/your-phone-could-soon-become-a-3d-scanner Your phone could soon become a 3D scanner Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2013-12-06T13:49:00-05:00 >2013-12-11T09:58:37-05:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/3y/3yfsf29i4icjehgy.jpg" width="514" height="334" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Most of us have gotten used to smartphones replacing long-established devices such as cameras and music players. Soon, however, they might be taking over the duties of something that is itself an emerging technology &ndash; the 3D scanner. Researchers at ETH Zurich have created an app that allows an ordinary smartphone to capture and display three-dimensional models of real-world objects, for subsequent finessing or even 3D printing.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/loose.dtd"> <html><head><meta></head></html>