Archinect - News 2015-11-27T16:06:58-05:00 Editor's Picks #414 Nam Henderson 2015-05-06T14:00:00-04:00 >2015-05-06T17:04:21-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="303" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Nicholas Korody</a>&nbsp;profiled <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">GRNASFCK</a>, an experimental landscape studio. Therein they explained "<em>We travel to places of material action, geologically leaky locations, where the evidence of disturbance, but also creation, is evident...While we see our narratives as a version of a field report, it seems important to acknowledge ourselves as emotional, human agents. In this way we are equally inspired by Hunter S. Thompson, John McPhee, and Chris Kraus</em>".</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Plus following last month&rsquo;s 7.8 magnitude earthquake, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Julia Ingalls</a>&nbsp;reviewed <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">How Architects Can Help Nepal (And Learn From Past Disastrous Mistakes/Successes)</a>.&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Will Galloway</a>&nbsp;stopped by and provided some insight into post-tsunami redevelopment in Tohoku</p><p>"<em>The trick is to &nbsp;still be there and still be engaged 2 years or 4 years or 5 years later, when communities are finally ready to build...Now is really the time for architects to act, to help build a sustainable community. But we blew our wad on sexy stuff in the early days, and anyway the news...</em></p> Methodolatry and the Art of Measure Places Journal 2013-11-06T17:41:00-05:00 >2013-11-11T21:14:43-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="402" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The default recourse to data-fication, the presumption that all meaningful flows and activity can be sensed and measured, is taking us toward a future in which the people shaping our cities and their policies rarely have the opportunity to consider the nature of our stickiest urban problems and the kind of questions they raise.</p></em><br /><br /><p> What do corporate smart-city programs have in common with D.I.Y. science projects and civic hackathons? &ldquo;Theirs is a city with an underlying logic,&rdquo; writes Shannon Mattern, &ldquo;made more efficient &mdash; or just, or sustainable, or livable &mdash; with a tweak to its algorithms or an expansion of its dataset.&rdquo;</p> <p> On Places, Mattern argues that the new wave of urban data science (and solutionism) is trending toward an obsession with data-for-data&rsquo;s-sake and an idolization of landscape research methods.</p>