Archinect - News 2016-10-24T23:22:57-04:00 Editor's Picks #452 Nam Henderson 2016-08-23T12:42:00-04:00 >2016-08-23T21:10:53-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="383" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Julia Ingalls</a>&nbsp;took readers on <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">a tour of some of the world's most attractive public housing projects</a>, from the last decade.&nbsp;<strong>ChrisDx</strong> commented "<em>The projects certainly appear innovative in images taken most likely when they were first built. I wonder how &lsquo;successful&rsquo; they have been in meeting the resident's needs and what they look like now</em>."</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Plus, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Nicholas Korody</a> investigated how <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">ED/GY, or Ethical Dwellings for Generation Y</a>, hopes to address "<em>new forms of living and owning in a changing London</em>".&nbsp;<strong>Olaf Design Ninja_</strong> &nbsp;was terrified "<em>holy shit is this dystopic!</em>" <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">The Birds of Venice</a> noted the "<em>Marxist sideboob.</em><em><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"> #housing</a></em>".</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""><br>&nbsp;</p><p><strong>News</strong><br>In <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Archinect Sessions One-to-One #33</a>&nbsp;executive director of the A+D Museum Epstein Jones, imagines how A+D could become the L.A version of <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Storefront</a>, while working to keep it accessible to the local community.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Senior editor&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Orhan Ayy&uuml;ce</a>&nbsp;reminded readers that&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Dan Graham hates conceptual art</a>.&nbsp;<strong>Thayer-D</strong>&nbsp;"<em>was enjoying him quite well until he drew an arbitrary line between ar...</em></p> Copenhagen copes with extreme weather by building parks that turn into ponds Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2016-01-22T13:21:00-05:00 >2016-02-10T00:43:49-05:00 <img src="" width="650" height="342" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Eventually, Saint Kjelds will be able to withstand &mdash; and even welcome &mdash; heavy rainfall and flooding. [...] More parks like it are being built to purposefully turn into small ponds during heavy rains, allowing them to capture and retain water on site until the drainage system has capacity to handle it.</p></em><br /><br /><p>More news on cities' response to climate change:</p><ul><li><a title="&quot;King tides&quot; give a glimpse of what the (near) future's rising seas will look like" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">"King tides" give a glimpse of what the (near) future's rising seas will look like</a></li><li><a title="Jakarta, already 40% below sea level, is building one of the biggest sea walls on Earth" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Jakarta, already 40% below sea level, is building one of the biggest sea walls on Earth</a></li><li><a title="Unchecked climate change will make the Gulf uninhabitable, claims new study" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Unchecked climate change will make the Gulf uninhabitable, claims new study</a></li><li><a title="Major international companies to set targets to switch to renewable energy" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Major international companies to set targets to switch to renewable energy</a></li><li><a title="When the next disaster strikes, how resilient would future-proof cities in the U.S. be?" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">When the next disaster strikes, how resilient would future-proof cities in the U.S. be?</a></li></ul> Our cities must adapt to climate change and growing populations within a single generation, according to the head of Arup Nicholas Korody 2016-01-04T13:43:00-05:00 >2016-01-17T22:00:00-05:00 <img src="" width="650" height="487" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Cities around the world have only one generation to meet the twin challenges of climate change and a rapidly growing urban population, the head of a global engineering firm has warned. Gregory Hodkinson, chairman of the Arup group, said that with more than half the world&rsquo;s population already living in cities, and the proportion set to rise to 70% by 2050, city leaders need to take urgent action.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Gregory Hodkinsin, the chairman of the engineering giant Arup Group, has warned that cities must adapt to climate change and booming population growth within the timespan of a single generation.&nbsp;</p><p>&ldquo;If we don&rsquo;t, in my view, we&rsquo;re screwed: my children and my grandchildren and everybody else&rsquo;s children," Hodkinsin told <em>the Guardian</em>.&nbsp;"We need to find a way to do this rapid urbanisation in a way that&rsquo;s not going to kill us &ndash; and to do it once.&rdquo;</p><p>Climate change and urban population growth are "twinned" challenges for a variety of reasons. As global temperatures rise, an increase in natural disasters and resource-driven conflict will likely drive displaced populations to urban centers, where shelter and access to basic necessities are more available. This is a pattern already <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">emerging</a>, for instance,&nbsp;in the mass migration of refugees from Syria and Iraq into Europe and elsewhere.</p><p>Cities currently house more than half of the world's population &ndash; and will most likely have to shelter up to 70% in t...</p> The Pragmatics of Adaptating to Sea Level Rise: The Next Wave @ UCLA Nicholas Korody 2015-03-09T15:49:00-04:00 >2015-03-11T18:44:36-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="650" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Beneath the vertiginous LED-strip lighting of Michael Maltzan's Billy Wilder Theater, a diverse audience gathered last Tuesday for a talk entitled "The Next Wave: Urban Adaptations for Rising Sea Levels." Co-presented by the Hammer Museum and UCLA&rsquo;s Institute of the Environment and Sustainability, the event brought together coastal geomorphologist Jeremy Lowe and civil engineer Peter Wijsman in a conversation moderated by Kristina Hill, a UC Berkeley Professor of Landscape Architecture. The talk was part of an on-going lecture series on "the most pressing issues surrounding the current and future state of water."</p><p>Hill began the evening's panel with a brief introduction to the unfolding realities of sea level rise, as well as some of the efforts underway to mitigate its impact. Pointing to an image of the San Francisco's Embarcadero embattled by high tides, Hill discussed the urgency of our particular temporal moment: we are in the last slow period of sea level rise that the Earth wil...</p> Adaptation - architecture and change in China Metropolitan Monk 2014-05-29T12:59:00-04:00 >2014-05-29T13:00:29-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="326" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>EMG set up <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">EMGdotART</a> Foundation [in 2012] &ndash; the first art and culture foundation established by a Chinese enterprise, to have a permanent gallery and headquarters in the heart of Venice, Italy.</p><p>"<em>More than roofs, doors, courtyards or staircases, adaptation is fundamental for the understanding of Chinese architecture.&nbsp;If the fleeting fascination for fundamentals during the upcoming&nbsp;<a title="14th International Architecture Exhibition | website" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">14th International Architecture Exhibition</a>&nbsp;[June 7 &ndash; 23 November 2014, Venice]&nbsp;will deal and&nbsp;try to understand the basic principles that create architecture; than,&nbsp;<strong>ADAPTATION</strong>&nbsp;-&nbsp;<strong>architecture and change in China</strong>&#12298;<strong>&#24212;&#21464;</strong>&mdash;&mdash;<strong>&#20013;&#22269;&#30340;&#24314;&#31569;&#21644;&#21464;&#21270;</strong>&#12299;&nbsp;focuses on the flexible framework that makes architecture (in China) possible.</em>" MovingCities co-curatorial statement</p><p>Taking place on the ground floor the historic Palazzo Zen &ndash; newly renovated by Chinese architectural studio <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">O-OFFICE</a> &ndash; <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">ADAPTATION, architecture and change in China</a> &ndash; selected as one of <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">21 Collateral Events</a> &ndash; is curated by Prof. Marino Folin (Rector of the IUAV University (19...</p> Gensler brings ‘hackable’ buildings to the real estate market Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2014-03-10T15:26:00-04:00 >2014-03-10T15:26:32-04:00 <img src="" width="606" height="340" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Gensler recently began a research project focused on Los Angeles and D.C., &ldquo;Hackable Buildings &ndash; Hackable Cities,&rdquo; exploring how building owners can adapt their properties to meet changing demand. &ldquo;It really started with some research that we were doing on the evolution of office buildings,&rdquo; said Raffael Scasserra, a Gensler principal. &ldquo;What we were looking at is what is that evolution like? What is it transforming to and what are buildings going to be?&rdquo;</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> Abitare China#34 | HUTONG/adaptation Metropolitan Monk 2013-11-04T23:36:00-05:00 >2013-11-04T23:39:45-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="189" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p> ABITARE China magazine invited <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">MovingCities</a> to guest edit its 34th issue on the topic of "(re) Design Heritage &ndash; Strategies of Urban Renewal and the Chinese City." Published in October 2013, MovingCities took this opportunity to address one of the most urgent issues to discuss when dealing with the urban, architectural, cultural, social and economical development of China and the city of Beijing &#21271;&#20140;: heritage, preservation, adaptive strategies and the hutong &#32993;&#21516;.</p> <p> Formal definition of hutong: <em>Hutongs are a type of narrow streets or alleys, most commonly associated with Beijing, China. In Beijing, hutongs are alleys formed by lines of siheyuan, traditional courtyard residences. Many neighbourhoods were formed by joining one siheyuan to another to form a hutong, and then joining one hutong to another. The word hutong is also used to refer to such neighbourhoods.</em></p> <p> MovingCities choose "<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">HUTONG /Adaptation</a>" as the unifying theme for this themed issue, wishing to approach this much debat...</p>