Archinect - News 2016-08-26T04:52:24-04:00 http://archinect.com/news/article/149946857/the-open-graves-where-new-york-buries-its-unclaimed-bodies The open graves where New York buries its unclaimed bodies Nicholas Korody 2016-05-23T14:09:00-04:00 >2016-05-31T00:28:24-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/o0/o0f8zbt3kmnm354r.jpg" width="514" height="215" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Twice a week or so, loaded with bodies boxed in pine, a New York City morgue truck passes through a tall chain-link gate and onto a ferry that has no paying passengers. Its destination is Hart Island, an uninhabited strip of land off the coast of the Bronx in Long Island Sound, where overgrown 19th-century ruins give way to mass graves gouged out by bulldozers and the only pallbearers are jail inmates paid 50 cents an hour. There, divergent life stories come to the same anonymous end.</p></em><br /><br /><p><em>"New York is unique among American cities in the way it disposes of the dead it considers unclaimed: interment on a lonely island, off-limits to the public, by a crew of inmates. Buried by the score in wide, deep pits, the Hart Island dead seem to vanish &mdash; and so does any explanation for how they came to be there."</em></p><p><img title="" alt="" src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/53/536rg5o2sxde3tnv.jpg"></p><p>Be forewarned: it's a pretty grim read. Unclaimed bodies tend to have tragic backstories, providing a portrait of a city that provides few resources to its most vulnerable inhabitants: the mentally ill, homeless, elderly, and impoverished.</p><p>"In the face of an end-of-life industry that can drain the resources of the most prudent, these people are especially vulnerable," writes author Nina Bernstein.</p><p>For more on spaces devoted to the deceased, check out these links:</p><ul><li><a href="http://archinect.com/news/article/123740675/they-died-as-they-designed-famous-architects-self-styled-gravestones" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">They died as they designed: famous architects' self-styled gravestones</a></li><li><a href="http://archinect.com/news/article/27482287/architectural-design-brings-light-to-funeral-home" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Architectural design brings light to funeral home</a></li><li><a href="http://archinect.com/news/article/147965230/of-death-and-facebook" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Of death and Facebook</a></li><li><a href="http://archinect.com/news/article/122124114/seattle-architect-seeks-to-redesign-america-s-burial-landscape" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Seattle architect seeks to redesign America's burial landscape</a></li><li><a href="http://archinect.com/news/article/136882864/approaching-a-multilayered-death-at-aldo-rossi-s-cemetery" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Approaching a ...</a></li></ul> http://archinect.com/news/article/136882864/approaching-a-multilayered-death-at-aldo-rossi-s-cemetery Approaching a multilayered death at Aldo Rossi’s cemetery Alexander Walter 2015-09-17T13:37:00-04:00 >2015-09-28T23:36:37-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/90/9039dec909aa2d554021ea3858f8fee1.jpg" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Aldo Rossi&rsquo;s addition to the San Cataldo Cemetery is a paragon of postmodern architecture, seeing the cemetery up close exposes some of the style&rsquo;s major shortcomings. [...] all you&rsquo;ve got left is a half-empty, unfinished cemetery with assorted maintenance equipment left lying around. Perhaps you can keep drawing meaning from this decay. But lord knows it&rsquo;s difficult to sustain a deep engagement with life and death after you&rsquo;ve tripped over a garden hose.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Related on Archinect:</p><ul><li><a href="http://archinect.com/news/article/122146647/how-a-postmodernist-department-store-is-trying-to-become-the-youngest-monument-in-poland" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">How a postmodernist department store is trying to become the youngest monument in Poland</a></li><li><a href="http://archinect.com/news/article/131877038/postmodern-no-1-poultry-divides-architects-in-debate-over-recent-heritage" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Postmodern No 1 Poultry divides architects in debate over recent heritage</a></li><li><a href="http://archinect.com/news/article/123740675/they-died-as-they-designed-famous-architects-self-styled-gravestones" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">They died as they designed: famous architects' self-styled gravestones</a></li></ul> http://archinect.com/news/article/123740675/they-died-as-they-designed-famous-architects-self-styled-gravestones They died as they designed: famous architects' self-styled gravestones Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-03-25T14:48:00-04:00 >2015-04-15T12:29:59-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/b2/b2gx01ak4za7wtc9.jpg" width="514" height="386" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Le Corbusier designed a pair of markers in the style of one of his own concrete architectural models. Carlo Scarpa, who was buried standing up and wrapped in linen in the style of a medieval knight, has a marble grave with a maze-like design. Frank Lloyd Wright's marker could not even be called a gravestone, because it looks more like an uncut rock. Meanwhile, Buckminster Fuller's grave has an esoteric quote he once gave to Playboy magazine inscribed on it: "Call me Trimtab."</p></em><br /><br /><p>Sure, an article like this suggests a click bait-y listicle, heavy on images and light on content. But what's installed astride an architect's final resting place is of grave (pardon the pun) importance. Not only would it be surrealistically disorienting to have an architect's professional style countered by an antithetical gravesite, but it also smacks of lost opportunity &ndash; this is the final personal statement, in a way, that an architect can make.</p><p>It's also heartening to realize that even when they died unexpectedly, these architects had their plans sorted. Check out their graves below (a wholehearted and respectful h/t to Curbed for sourcing most of the images):</p><p><em>Alvar Aalto, Hietaniemi cemetery in Helsinki, Finland:</em></p><p><img title="" alt="" src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/ef/efd2637c5f6770ee53a134d6d07d13cf.jpg"></p><p><em>Bruce Goff, Chicago's Graceland cemetery:</em></p><p><img title="" alt="" src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/68/686d80c7ee068e6e86ded31e5614292b.jpg"></p><p><em>Adolf Loos, Zentralfriedhof in Vienna, Austria:</em></p><p><img title="" alt="" src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/de/de2c5ee5a33efc81ccf76463bf2d1f02.jpg"></p><p><em>Buckminster Fuller, Mount Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge, Massachusetts:</em></p><p><img title="" alt="" src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/c7/c78faf845519e2f423f0220ccc87e980.jpg"></p><p><em>Frank Lloyd Wright (first grave), Unity Chapel Cemetery in Wyoming, Wisconsin (According to Curbed, FLW's final r...</em></p> http://archinect.com/news/article/122606084/archinect-sessions-episode-20-three-funerals-and-a-curator Archinect Sessions Episode #20: Three Funerals and a Curator Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-03-12T18:01:00-04:00 >2015-03-25T10:53:03-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/gm/gmdnswh9tbtxxl6f.jpg" width="514" height="333" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Ten minutes before we sat down to record this week's episode, the Pritzker Prize Laureate was announced &ndash; posthumously. The winner, <a href="http://archinect.com/news/article/122595638/frei-otto-wins-2015-pritzker-prize" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Frei Otto</a> (1925 - 2015), was a German architect whose impressive work and research with lightweight and sustainable structures influenced countless architects through the 20th century to today. Otto was informed of the prize before his death in Germany this past Monday, March 9, prompting the Pritzker committee to make the formal announcement the day after.&nbsp;</p><p>This episode, we reflect on Otto's remarkable life and the Prize's announcement in the midst of his passing. We also examine the uncertain fate (and value) of <a href="http://archinect.com/news/article/122285690/frank-gehry-s-winton-guest-house-to-be-up-for-sale-on-may-19-in-chicago#CommentsAnchor" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Frank Gehry's Winton Guest House</a>, which will be up for sale on May 19, and consider whether architects should shoulder the cultural and emotional weight of deciding <a href="http://archinect.com/news/article/122440514/architect-proposes-turning-dead-humans-into-compost" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">how we bury our dead</a>.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/c6/c69c27jy207q8mga.jpg"></p><p>And on the heels of <a href="http://archinect.com/news/article/121746764/google-unveils-big-heatherwick-studios-collaboration-for-new-campus-master-plan" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Google's announcement that BIG will collaborate with Heatherwick Studios</a> on their campus expansion, Amelia spoke with curator <a href="http://archinect.com/news/tag/569104/brooke-hodge" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Brooke Hodge</a> i...</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/122124114/seattle-architect-seeks-to-redesign-america-s-burial-landscape Seattle architect seeks to redesign America's burial landscape Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-03-04T13:30:00-05:00 >2015-03-05T14:11:19-05:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/b1/b1f732423e82b1f8945b3f16a740e795.jpg" width="514" height="649" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Seattle-based architect [Katrina Spade], originally from New England, has a vision that could radically reshape not just the death-care industry but the way we think about death itself. She calls her plan the Urban Death Project, and it proposes a middle road between burial and cremation: compost. [...] The centerpiece of the idea is an approximately three-story-high building in an urban center where people could bring their dead.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/loose.dtd"> <html><head><meta></head></html> http://archinect.com/news/article/108557847/the-new-urban-cemetery The New Urban Cemetery Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2014-09-09T13:06:00-04:00 >2014-09-09T13:06:28-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/b1/b13a3fcd4fbe37c3d69983460a66194b.jpg" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The idea of the Future Cemetery is to create a place for people to connect with death. What that actually means and looks like is still in development, Troyer says, but in the first stage of the project they did everything from projections to audio installations. Now, they&rsquo;re working on developing augmented reality experiences in cemeteries&mdash;elements that are only visible with certain devices and if you know they&rsquo;re there. The idea is to allow people to add to their own cemetery experience...</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/loose.dtd"> <html><head><meta></head></html> http://archinect.com/news/article/81473658/editor-s-picks-332 Editor's Picks #332 Nam Henderson 2013-09-10T11:11:00-04:00 >2013-09-12T05:07:10-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/r0/r03r5pyd33uysuet.jpg" width="514" height="386" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Orhan Ayy&uuml;ce penned a remembrance to his friend architect Larry Totah, titled Slow Weather of Architecture. Therein he describes "The House"...overlooking Pacific Ocean rather edgewise and build like a long drawing depicting a horizontally composed architecture. The fog, roof and the walls are more of Chumash hiring Hopi to build on their mountains for few exquisite basket full of shellfish to adorn the wedding dresses in Hopi villages like the ones a Don Juan dreamed of, a fair exchange"...</p></em><br /><br /><p> <img alt="" src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/bp/bpt69fg49nihb367.jpg"></p> <p> <a href="http://archinect.com/AmeliaTH" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Amelia Taylor-Hochberg</a>&nbsp;interviewed architectural photographer Bilyana Dimitrova, formerly Metropolis Magazine&rsquo;s photo editor. The two discussed <a href="http://archinect.com/features/article/79627034/architecture-photography-in-the-21st-century-interview-with-bilyana-dimitrova" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Architecture Photography in the 21st Century</a> ahead of the exhibition '<a href="http://architecture.woodbury.edu/jsi/?portfolio=beyond-the-assignment-defining-photographs-of-art-and-design" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Beyond the Assignment: Defining Photographs of Architecture and Design</a>'&nbsp;which will be presented by the Julius Shulman Institute at Woodbury University, October 5 - November 1, 2013.</p> <p> <img alt="" src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/xr/xr5ni4zco9rxbyar.jpg"></p> <p> <a href="http://archinect.com/orhan" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Orhan Ayy&uuml;ce</a>&nbsp;penned a remembrance to his friend architect Larry Totah, titled <a href="http://archinect.com/features/article/81002757/slow-weather-of-architecture" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Slow Weather of Architecture</a>.&nbsp;Therein he describes "<strong>The House</strong>" which "<em>continuously frames and de-frames itself in three or four sets of axis minded passages. In the front, overlooking Pacific Ocean rather edgewise and build like a long drawing depicting a horizontally composed architecture. The fog, roof and the walls are more of Chumash hiring Hopi to build on their mountains for few exquisite basket full of shellfish to adorn the wedding dresses in Hopi villages like the ones a Don Juan dreamed of, a fair ...</em></p> http://archinect.com/news/article/81097691/thresholds-marks-the-unmarked-at-kent-cemetery ‘Thresholds’ marks the unmarked at Kent cemetery Bradly Gunn 2013-09-05T14:20:00-04:00 >2013-09-06T11:32:34-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/k1/k1fz0uf4tsh73mif.jpg" width="514" height="342" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>&ldquo;It is amazing to realize you could walk around the site not knowing if there is a body underneath you,&rdquo; Nelson said. &ldquo;How do you commemorate that?&rdquo;</p></em><br /><br /><p> Of the approximately 200 people buried at Saar Pioneer Cemetery, there are 89 unmarked graves, each&nbsp;unable to inform visitors of their presence and the role they played in Kent history. Collaborative artists&nbsp;Frances Nelson and Bradly Gunn seek to mark the unmarked by creating a series &ldquo;thresholds&rdquo; to walk under&nbsp;and pass through, as an acknowledgement of the final resting place of Kent&rsquo;s founding pioneers.&nbsp;</p> <p> THRESHOLDS is generously supported by 4Culture&rsquo;s Site Specific Program and the University of&nbsp;Washington&rsquo;s College of Built Environment&rsquo;s Digital Fabrication Lab, with additional support from McLendon&nbsp;Hardware, Dunn Lumber and Miller Paint Co.</p>