Archinect - News 2014-10-24T05:50:37-04:00 http://archinect.com/news/article/105250586/d-c-s-war-over-pop-ups D.C.'s war over pop-ups Alexander Walter 2014-07-28T15:04:00-04:00 >2014-07-28T15:08:49-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/52/52b8a245bf25e22ba484503aefbf9e09.jpg" width="500" height="500" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Throughout his neighborhood of Lanier Heights, developers are buying up two-story townhouses and building an extra floor or two, additions that are known as pop-ups. They&rsquo;re also extending the structures as far back as allowed, to within 15 feet of the property line, obliterating backyards in the process. [...] A few doors down the other way is a deafening construction site, where a single-family home is being turned into eight units, taking full advantage of what was once the backyard.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/loose.dtd"> <html><head><meta></head></html> http://archinect.com/news/article/98204993/cities-need-goldilocks-housing-density-not-too-high-or-low-but-just-right Cities need Goldilocks housing density – not too high or low, but just right Alexander Walter 2014-04-17T13:31:00-04:00 >2014-04-21T20:44:00-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/00/003508c69ab984a03ea84c4a73835db5.jpg" width="460" height="276" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>In so-called hot cities [...] battles are raging over height limits and urban density, all on the basis of two premises: 1) that building all these towers will increase the supply of housing and therefore reduce its costs; 2) that increasing density is the green, sustainable thing to do and that towers are the best way to do it. I am not sure that either is true.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/loose.dtd"> <html><head><meta></head></html> http://archinect.com/news/article/91832887/protected-bike-lanes-strengthen-city-economy-report-finds Protected bike lanes strengthen city economy, report finds Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2014-01-22T13:07:00-05:00 >2014-01-27T21:46:07-05:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/2u/2u6j4iqlx5mp18aj.jpg" width="514" height="672" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p> According to a recent <a href="http://b.3cdn.net/bikes/123e6305136c85cf56_0tm6vjeuo.pdf" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">report</a> from <a href="http://www.peopleforbikes.org/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">PeopleForBikes</a> and <a href="http://www.peoplepoweredmovement.org/site/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Alliance for Biking &amp; Walking</a>, protected city bike lanes can actually encourage local business success. As trends show workers moving into U.S. cities (rather than out into suburbs), and businesses catering to a younger workforce that relies less on cars, cycling infrastructure has becomes integral to strengthening local businesses and encouraging long-term economic growth for the entire city.</p> <p> A lot of what delays cycling infrastructure is the presumption that it only benefits cyclists. It can be hard to justify to citizens who don't cycle that bike lanes and bike-share programs will benefit the city at large, and not just the "cyclist" demographic. But cities have begun to take notice of the positive change that cycling infrastructure can help bring to their local businesses, in very concrete ways.</p> <p> <img alt="" src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/o7/o7e3k4sw259uvss0.jpg" title=""></p> <p> The report focuses on statistics from cities with expanding networks of protected bike lanes: Austin, TX; San Francisco, CA;...</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/80617354/housing-design-in-the-future-los-angeles-and-the-politics-of-micro-units "Housing Design in the Future Los Angeles" and the politics of micro-units Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2013-08-29T21:08:00-04:00 >2013-09-08T16:10:11-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/os/osodlawtfm4hq7cr.jpg" width="295" height="197" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Architects Alice Kimm, FAIA; John Mutlow, FAIA; Lorcan O&rsquo;Herihy, FAIA; Warren Techentin, AIA; Patrick Tighe, FAIA; and Ed Woll, Ph.D. will present housing projects in development and discuss the potential of micro-housing units, transit oriented development and changing lifestyles to create livable density in LA.</p></em><br /><br /><p> This past Wednesday, I attended a panel discussion of architects at the University of Southern California about the future of housing in Los Angeles -- an exciting and highly debatable topic nowadays, as transit networks expand and neighborhoods densify. Presented in conjunction with two recently-concluded coordinated exhibitions originally sponsored by <a href="http://laforum.org/content/exhibitions/how-small-is-too-small-and-by-rightby-design" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">LA Forum for Architecture and Urban Design</a>, "BY-Right/BY-Design" and "How Small Is Too Small?", the discussion was a type of send-off by trying to describe what smaller and more efficient housing in Los Angeles may look like in the next twenty years. While it didn't really provide any tangible answers to that prompt, the panel did settle on a necessary focus of residential architecture: empathizing with the specific inhabitant.</p> <p> <img alt="" src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/bc/bct7ovuhudzbjxpu.jpg" title=""></p> <p> Given population growth within the past twenty years, housing is certainly a top priority for developers: since 1990, LA County as a whole has risen from approximately 8.9M to 10M*, and accommodating th...</p>