Archinect - News 2014-12-20T00:09:58-05:00 http://archinect.com/news/article/115505365/relocation-or-adaptation-from-sprawl-to-archipelago Relocation or Adaptation: From Sprawl to Archipelago Nicholas Korody 2014-12-08T16:05:00-05:00 >2014-12-11T19:41:01-05:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/83/833f3cbd4ffcfe4824750530025a024f.jpg" width="514" height="514" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>1. By current estimates, if the polar ice caps melt, sea levels around the world will rise by between 80 and 100m. 2. Many cities (and, by default, around 70 per cent of the world's population) border on a body of water of some kind. According to 2010 government figures, 39 per cent of US population live on a coast. Half live within 50 miles of the ocean.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Based on worst-case scenarios for sea-level rise, cartographer Jeremy Linn imagined the future of three of America's major Western cities. He used topographic information to speculate on what an 80m &ndash; &asymp;262 ft &ndash; &nbsp;rise would look like as well as coming up with new names for this new geography. While such an increase in sea levels won't occur in our lifetime, our grandchildren could one day live in cities like this (if drastic food shortages, violent conflict, drug-adapted 'superbugs,' drought, and extreme weather don't get them first...). Such a rise in sea level would require every ice sheet on the planet to melt.</p><p>In Linn's imaginings, Portland (pictured above) has become a veritable archipelago of islands dominated by the spine of what-is-now Northwest Portland.</p><p>Likewise, much of contemporary Seattle will be replaced by a network of waterways. Only the city's hills would remains as isolated islands.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/47/47c88c7636fab03140c59c0cd8125d3e.jpg"></p><p>Los Angeles-of-the-future is almost entirely inundated. To get from Baldwin Island (Hil...</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/112413471/louisiana-is-disappearing-into-the-sea Louisiana is Disappearing into the Sea Nicholas Korody 2014-10-29T13:23:00-04:00 >2014-10-29T13:23:33-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/pa/panl4gel80kftvg0.jpg" width="514" height="361" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The US state of Louisiana is slowly disappearing into the Gulf of Mexico as its fragile wetlands are eroded by rising sea levels. Approximately 75 square kilometres are lost each year and the US Geological Survey has warned that the entire habitat - which represents 40% of all wetlands in the US - could be destroyed within 200 years. The loss is partly down to natural evolutionary processes, but experts say human behaviour... has made the region more vulnerable to storm surges.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/loose.dtd"> <html><head><meta></head></html> http://archinect.com/news/article/104863252/twitterbot-can-now-warn-uk-residents-when-river-levels-are-rising Twitterbot can now warn UK residents when river-levels are rising Archinect 2014-07-23T13:53:00-04:00 >2014-07-23T13:53:19-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/4l/4lvkxi9xlf6s7twj.jpg" width="514" height="333" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>A unique collaborative project has been launched, bringing a constant stream of live river level data to anyone who needs to stay up-to-date with environmental conditions. Shoothill GaugeMap brings the real-time status of England and Wales&rsquo; rivers and tides from Environment Agency monitoring stations, to people in an accessible and user-friendly manner. It works via the web and Twitter, and is available on all major desktop browsers, tablets and smartphones.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/loose.dtd"> <html><head><meta></head></html> http://archinect.com/news/article/104722607/relocation-or-adaptation-construction-on-steel-wall-along-jersey-shore-set-to-begin Relocation or Adaptation: Construction on Steel Wall Along Jersey Shore Set to Begin Nicholas Korody 2014-07-21T18:10:00-04:00 >2014-07-21T18:10:10-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/fw/fwv3scadh9uze9ec.jpg" width="514" height="347" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Construction of a four-mile long steel wall going up along a stretch of the Jersey Shore ripped apart during Hurricane Sandy is expected to begin next month [...] The state Department of Environmental Protection awarded a $23.8 million contract to Springfield-based EIC Associates in May to build the steel wall that will stretch from Lyman Street in Mantoloking through Brick.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/loose.dtd"> <html><head><meta></head></html> http://archinect.com/news/article/104712143/relocation-or-adaptation-map-shows-potential-impact-of-flooding-on-metro-boston Relocation or Adaptation: Map Shows Potential Impact of Flooding on Metro Boston Nicholas Korody 2014-07-21T15:29:00-04:00 >2014-07-22T18:44:21-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/bd/bdjggyhu406xm2ny.jpg" width="514" height="400" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The map [...] based on a report by the Boston Harbor Association, shows the impact of 5-foot and 7.5-foot coastal floods in Metro Boston that could be caused by a number of things &mdash; a rising sea level, storm surges, astronomical high tides or other causes.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/loose.dtd"> <html><head><meta></head></html> http://archinect.com/news/article/103244853/relocation-or-adaptation-kiribati-buys-land-in-fiji Relocation or Adaptation: Kiribati buys land in Fiji Nicholas Korody 2014-07-02T13:23:00-04:00 >2014-07-08T23:30:22-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/13/13qppanvx00re5k5.jpg" width="514" height="386" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Aiming to avoid a humanitarian crisis, Kiribati recently purchased land in Fiji &mdash; about 1,200 miles away &mdash; where its residents would be relocated in the event that sea-level rise drowns the Pacific island nation and displaces its population of just over 100,000 people [...] Contributing very little to the greenhouse gases that most scientists agree fuel climate change, Kiribati is among the least responsible for the present climate crisis.</p></em><br /><br /><p>As atmospheric CO2 levels near 402 ppm without any significant curtailing of industrial production by the major nations of the global economy, time is running out for many of the poorest and most vulnerable countries. The UN and other transnational bodies are beginning to seem like echo chambers for the leaders of island nations like Kiribati and the Marshall Islands. The sad irony of global warming is that it is countries least responsible for it that will bear the most burden.</p><p>Some architects are producing imaginative designs for adaptive structures. For example, <a href="http://archinect.com/features/article/76244" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">LILYPAD</a> is a project by Belgian architect&nbsp;&nbsp;Vincent Callebaut. Described as a "prototypical auto-sufficient amphibious city," the project would adapt to rising sea levels while serving as a shelter for &nbsp;climate refugees.</p><p>But let's be real: adaptive strategies are fundamentally out of the question for countries without the resources for expensive architectural projects &ndash; ie. the countries that need them the most. Efforts by n...</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/80594824/waterworld-koen-olthuis-floating-structures-from-slums-to-stadiums Waterworld: Koen Olthuis' floating structures, from slums to stadiums Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2013-08-29T14:17:00-04:00 >2013-09-02T19:48:34-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/c8/c8bqo48pc7ryc5st.jpg" width="514" height="654" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>[It] is the same technology as we use in Holland. It&rsquo;s made up of concrete caisson, boxes, a shoebox of concrete. We fill them with styrofoam. So with [these] you get unthinkable floating foundations [...] The house itself is the same as a normal house, the same material. Then you want to figure out how to get water and electricity and remove sewage and use the same technology as cruise ships." - Koen Olthuis</p></em><br /><br /><p> Dutch architect Koen Olthuis sees the future of architecture floating out to sea -- quite literally. Responding to undeniable ecological shifts of rising sea levels and seasonal flooding, Olthuis has proposed floatable-projects all along the social spectrum, designing prefabricated multi-use units for waterfront slums in Dhaka, "amphibious" housing in Holland and Columbia,&nbsp;private island-villas for the "stupidly rich", and foldable Olympic stadiums.</p> <p> See projects from Olthius'&nbsp;<a href="http://www.waterstudio.nl/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Waterstudio.NL</a>, in the tradition of <a href="http://archinect.com/news/article/49772782/floating-architecture-finding-ways-to-live-with-rising-water" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">floating architecture inspired by Dutch history and worldwide realities</a>.</p>