Archinect - News 2014-04-21T00:39:31-04:00 http://archinect.com/news/article/76255489/a-recipe-to-live-modern-japanese-straw-house-naturally-heated-by-compost "A Recipe To Live": Modern Japanese Straw House Naturally Heated By Compost Justine Testado 2013-07-02T12:06:00-04:00 >2013-07-02T19:12:31-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/tj/tjau9h5lnp94l54d.jpg" width="514" height="349" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p> The simple, sustainable design of "A Recipe to Live" easily integrates with the lifestyle and landscape of the dairy farm town Taiki-cho in Hokkaido. Designed by students Masaki Ogasawara, Keisuke Tsukada and Erika Mikami of Waseda University, the project was the winner of the 2011 LIXIL International University Architectural Competition.</p> <p> <img alt="" src="http://assets.inhabitat.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/1/files/2013/06/a-recipe-to-live-straw-house-waseda-university.jpg"><br><img alt="" src="http://assets.inhabitat.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/1/files/2013/06/Waseda-University-Students-A-Recipe-To-Live-Straw-House-2.jpg"></p> <p> "A Recipe to Live" is a perfect mixture of pleasing organic aesthetics and practicality that is suitable for life on the pastures. Clean lines and geometric shapes give the shelter durability, while the spacious interior and simple floor plan is ideal for performing everyday tasks or resting.&nbsp;On the other hand,&nbsp;natural tones, soft lighting, and dried straw convey an organic feel that reflect the house's pastoral surroundings. However, even these aesthetic qualities are functional.</p> <p> <img alt="" src="http://assets.inhabitat.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/1/files/2013/06/Waseda-University-Students-A-Recipe-To-Live-Straw-House-5.jpg"><br><img alt="" src="http://assets.inhabitat.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/1/files/2013/06/Waseda-University-Students-A-Recipe-To-Live-Straw-House-7.jpg"><br> &nbsp;</p> <p> <img alt="" src="http://assets.inhabitat.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/1/files/2013/06/Waseda-University-Students-A-Recipe-To-Live-Straw-House-3.jpg"><br><br> An example--and perhaps the house's most unique feature--is its zero-energy heating and cooling system, which uses only dried straw and agricultural ferm...</p>