Archinect - News 2015-11-29T23:32:51-05:00 "Latin America is where modernist Utopia went to die." – A closer look at the changing urban landscape of Caracas Alexander Walter 2015-11-25T17:24:00-05:00 >2015-11-25T18:40:30-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="365" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>&lsquo;El mejor anuncio de la historia&rsquo;, or &lsquo;the best ad in history&rsquo; is a picture taken in February 2008, which neatly encapsulates several aspects of the city&rsquo;s urban landscape: the formal, the informal and the promotional. '[...]Around and in between the super bloques a carpet of slums has grown, an organism that now seems to bind the blocks together in some symbiotic relationship. These are the kind of hybrid forms that are developing in Latin American cities [...]&rsquo;</p></em><br /><br /><p>Related in the Archinect news:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Venezuelan Government Evicts Residents From World's Tallest Slum</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Without Housing Reform, is a "Tower of David" Coming to Your City?</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Housing mobility vs. America's growing slum problem</a></li></ul> Ed Soja 1940 - 2015 Orhan Ayyüce 2015-11-03T11:40:00-05:00 >2015-11-05T21:23:34-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="393" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Murray Low has passed on the sad news of the death of Edward Soja. I first heard him talk on Postmodern Geographies in 1995 &ndash; this would have been work that ended up in Thirdspace &ndash; and the talk really motivated me to examine the spatial aspects of Foucault and Lefebvre.</p></em><br /><br /><p>"Los Angeles seems to break every rule of urban readability and regularity. it is no surprise, then, that Southern California has become a center for innovative and nontraditional urban theory and analysis." - Ed Soja</p><p><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">The Postmodern City / Bonaventure Hotel</a></p> Africa's challenges and opportunities to get urbanization right Alexander Walter 2015-10-14T14:15:00-04:00 >2015-10-24T00:43:02-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="191" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>This is important for Africa, where despite high urbanisation rates the development focus has been primarily rural. Consider Ghana. The country&rsquo;s urban population has grown from four million in 1984 to more than 14 million today. Fifty one percent of Ghanaians now live in cities. While urbanisation rates vary across Africa, Ghana reflects an overall global trend towards a predominantly urban future. Ghana demonstrates how cities can be highly productive in Africa.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Related on Archinect:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">MASS Design Group to propose "Bauhaus of Africa" at U.N. Summit</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Chinese Urbanism takes root in Africa</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">A Look at Africa's Modernist Architecture</a></li></ul> A city for the future but devoid of people Nicholas Korody 2015-10-06T18:07:00-04:00 >2015-10-08T22:37:27-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="360" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>In the arid plains of the southern New Mexico desert, between the site of the first atomic bomb test and the U.S.-Mexico border, a new city is rising from the sand. Planned for a population of 35,000, the city will showcase a modern business district downtown, and neat rows of terraced housing in the suburbs. It will be supplied with pristine streets, parks, malls and a church. But no one will ever call it home.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Planned by the telecommunications and tech firm Pegasus Global Holdings, the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">CITE</a> (Center for Innovation, Testing and Evaluation) is a $1 billion plan to build a model city to test out and develop new technologies.<br><br><img title="" alt="" src=""><br><img title="" alt="" src=""><br><br>With specialized zones for agriculture, energy, and water treatment, the city would also play host to tests for new tech like self-driving cars, responsive roads, and "smart homes" of all kinds.</p><p>CITE would have built-in sensors throughout, as well as a central control room to oversee operations.&nbsp;<br><img title="" alt="" src=""><br><img title="" alt="" src=""><br><br>CITE does not plan to have humans inhabiting the city to allow for faster testing and fewer potential mishaps. But that presents its own issues: after all, these technologies are ultimately intended for social use, and even "smart cities" have to be populated by humans.</p><p>"The inhabitants of cities are not just interchangeable individuals that can be dropped into experimental settings," Professor Steve Rayner, co-director of the Oxford Programme for the Future of Cities, tells CNN.&nbsp;"Th...</p> Adam Gopnik on why cities can't win Alexander Walter 2015-10-05T18:28:00-04:00 >2015-10-08T22:56:28-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Cities can&rsquo;t win. When they do well, people resent them as citadels of inequality; when they do badly, they are cesspools of hopelessness. In the seventies and eighties, the seemingly permanent urban crisis became the verdict that American civilization had passed on itself. Forty years later, cities mostly thrive, crime has been in vertiginous decline, the young cluster together in old neighborhoods [...] &mdash;and so big cities turn into hateful centers of self-absorbed privilege.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> Maxwell Anderson Moves back to NYC and the New Cities Foundation Donna Sink 2015-09-29T13:16:00-04:00 >2015-10-08T00:27:29-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="730" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>&ldquo;My growing interest in how cultural districts can shape cities led me to this new, exciting opportunity in New York City.&rdquo;</p></em><br /><br /><p>Maxwell Anderson is returning to New York, to be Director of Grant Programs at The New Cities Foundation.&nbsp; Dallas' loss (and formerly Indianapolis' deeply felt loss) is good urbanism's gain.&nbsp; I am excited about this change in focus by someone who I know to be a great thinker.</p><p>Press release from NCF <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">here</a>.</p> Binational Urbanism – On the Road to Paradise Released BOARD 2015-09-01T10:13:00-04:00 >2015-09-01T12:23:42-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="415" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Binational urbanism has the potential to become one of the most interesting forms of life in the twenty-first century.</p></em><br /><br /><p>The Amsterdam-based publishing house <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">trancityxvaliz</a> just released Bernd Upmeyer&rsquo;s new book entitled <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">&ldquo;Binational Urbanism &ndash; On the Road to Paradise&rdquo;</a>.<br><br>&ldquo;Never before was the mobility of individuals higher than it is today. People work and live not only in different places, but often even in different countries. Binational Urbanism examines the way of life of people who start a second life in a second city in a second nation-state, without saying goodbye to their first city. They live in constant transit between two homes, between two countries.</p><p>Binational urbanists come from all strata of society, from the highly educated and cosmopolitan creative classes to the working class. Through their continuous change of location, binational urbanists appear to be living in a state that is characterized by a constant longing, or a constant homesickness, for the other city. The author interviewed people of Turkish origin currently living in Germany, who commute regularly between cities in Germany a...</p> Chinese Urbanism takes root in Africa Alexander Walter 2015-08-17T11:14:00-04:00 >2015-08-26T12:46:09-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="289" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Across the continent, Chinese companies are building highways, railways, sports stadiums, mass housing complexes, and sometimes entire cities. But China isn&rsquo;t just providing the manpower to fuel quickly urbanizing African cities. It is exporting its own version of urbanization, creating cities and economic zones that look remarkably similar to Chinese ones.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Related in the Archinect News:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Urban China: Chinese Urbanism in Africa</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">A Look at Africa's Modernist Architecture</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Admire the diversity of African vernacular architecture in this growing online database</a></li></ul> Beijing's challenges to become the center of Jing-Jin-Ji — a supercity of 130 million people Alexander Walter 2015-07-21T08:00:00-04:00 >2015-07-25T16:37:21-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>For decades, China&rsquo;s government has tried to limit the size of Beijing, the capital, through draconian residency permits. Now, the government has embarked on an ambitious plan to make Beijing the center of a new supercity of 130 million people. The planned megalopolis, a metropolitan area that would be about six times the size of New York&rsquo;s, is meant to revamp northern China&rsquo;s economy and become a laboratory for modern urban growth.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Related stories:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">China&rsquo;s "most influential architect" is not pleased with the state of Chinese urbanism</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Beijing mayor says air pollution makes his city "unlivable"</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">China Moves to Ease Home-Registration Rules in Urbanization Push</a></li></ul> New Urbanism takes over Chicago’s suburbs Alexander Walter 2015-07-07T17:20:00-04:00 >2015-07-10T14:10:19-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="386" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>But thanks to increased interest from buyers and less resistance from village governments, developers are constructing more new-urbanism-style homes in the burbs. &ldquo;Millennials and boomers are demanding it,&rdquo; explains Drew Williams-Clark, principal planner at the Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> Istanbul’s introverted megaspaces Alexander Walter 2015-06-18T23:42:00-04:00 >2015-06-22T20:58:28-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="204" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>A new typology of XL-architecture is emerging in Istanbul, negating the urban context. These &lsquo;Citadels-on-Steroids&rsquo; rapidly encroach on the city&rsquo;s urban fabric. [...] This might very well be the future of all cities. As city walls and state boundaries erode under late capitalism, the walls are only rebuilt at a smaller scale to maintain immunity from the chaos outside.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> Creating a Northern England Powerhouse Nam Henderson 2015-05-20T05:00:00-04:00 >2015-05-19T17:01:07-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="289" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>It's insane. Each city in the North is too small to fight against that. We can only drag some of that investment northwards if we work together</p></em><br /><br /><p>In England efforts have begun&nbsp;to corral the North's population of 15 million into a collective force that could begin to rival that of London and the South East. A minister for the Northern Powerhouse has been appointed and the&nbsp;initial/low hanging fruit would include, devolution of some fiscal powers and regional cooperation on issues of major public investment, such as&nbsp;in transport infrastructure.</p> Mumbai's Dharavi 'slum': Opportunities & challenges Alexander Walter 2015-05-18T14:45:00-04:00 >2015-05-18T16:28:47-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="321" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The slum, of course, is the hottest button in urbanism. Beneath the clich&eacute; that half the world&rsquo;s population lives in cities &mdash; and that urban populations will double by 2050 &mdash; is the fact that only bottom-up informal settlements, or slums, can absorb several billion new residents in the timeframe. [...] URBZ is notable in that it offers a third way at looking at Dharavi &mdash; as both a failure and a better path to success than stillborn smart cities or other attempts at top-down instant urbanism.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Related:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Will India's 'smart city' initiative exacerbate social stratification?</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">"Great City...Terrible Place": A discussion on the urban future of India</a></li></ul> Amid historic nuclear negotiations, Tehran's urbanism is shifting Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-05-11T13:58:00-04:00 >2015-05-13T20:30:57-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="329" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>If ongoing discussions with the United States and others prove successful, sanctions affecting the Iranian economy will likely be lifted, exposing the country to a forceful wave of globalization. But the shift from isolation to inclusion has already begun to transform Tehran. [...] It&rsquo;s a city that, at this moment, is intensely influenced by international relations, shaping itself into a burgeoning urban hub.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> Architecture Critic Mark Lamster: "We systemically encourage bad building." Alexander Walter 2015-05-07T18:15:00-04:00 >2015-05-13T07:29:10-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="294" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Here is a constant refrain: Why is so much new building junk? [...] The truth is that architects don&rsquo;t have that much power. Architects don&rsquo;t design most buildings; they are designed by developers or contractors working from&nbsp;cookie-cutter plans. Perhaps an architect signs off. [...] In any number of ways&mdash;our building codes, our housing policies, our preservation statutes&mdash;we systemically encourage bad building.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Related:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Rachel Slade dares to ask: "Why is Boston so ugly?"</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">The new 5 over 1 Seattle, where "everything looks the same"</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Blair Kamin not impressed by Chicago's latest housing developments</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Jeff Sheppard calls downtown Denver's new housing developments "meaningless, uninspiring"</a></li></ul> Our infrastructure is expanding to include animals Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-05-07T14:07:00-04:00 >2015-05-13T19:05:40-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>municipal infrastructure is being expanded to include living creatures. In many ways, of course, this is simply the contemporary urbanization of a practice that goes back millennia. However, the ensuing juxtapositions &ndash; of 21st-century landscapes and cities being maintained not by high-tech machines or by specialty equipment but by neo-medieval groups of trained animals &ndash; can be quite jarring. Animal labour is once more becoming an explicit component of the modern metropolis</p></em><br /><br /><p>The absolute premise, and conclusion, here is that human urbanism is ineluctably woven within all animal ecologies, and that harnessing inter-species relationships within urban systems can be advantageous for every bit of the food web. A few instances from the piece are:</p><ul><li>landscaping llamas for Chicago's O'Hare's "Grazing Herd"</li><li>falcons in Dubai trained to thin out pesty pigeon populations</li><li>waste-clearing pigs in Cairo</li></ul><p>Using natural animal processes to the urban-human's advantage is all well and good, but as the article points out, it's not one that can be easily "scaled". When urban needs outpace the natural rhythms of a supportive ecological system, when we <em>just can't scale nature big enough,&nbsp;</em>humans will simply create their own animal helpers &ndash;&nbsp;<em>New Scientist&nbsp;</em>alludes to a future in which animals are modified to better serve human needs.</p> MONU #22 on Transnational Urbanism released MAGAZINEONURBANISM 2015-04-21T12:12:00-04:00 >2015-04-28T20:47:29-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="694" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>To prepare our cities for the emergence and growth of transnational lifestyles we need to invent new urban and architectural forms that are adapted to these new ways of life. This is what the French sociologist and assistant Mayor of Paris, Jean-Louis Missika, emphasized in an exclusive interview with MONU entitled &ldquo;Libert&eacute;, Digitalit&eacute;, Cr&eacute;ativit&eacute;&rdquo; on the topic of &ldquo;Transnational Urbanism&rdquo;. (Bernd Upmeyer, Editor-in-Chief, April 2015)</p></em><br /><br /><p>To prepare our cities for the emergence and growth of transnational lifestyles we need to invent new urban and architectural forms that are adapted to these new ways of life. This is what the French sociologist and assistant Mayor of Paris, <em><strong>Jean-Louis Missika</strong></em>, emphasized in an exclusive interview with <strong>MONU</strong> entitled <strong>&ldquo;Libert&eacute;, Digitalit&eacute;, Cr&eacute;ativit&eacute;&rdquo;</strong> on the topic of <strong>&ldquo;Transnational Urbanism&rdquo;</strong>. This new issue of <strong>MONU</strong> focuses on the impact of <strong>transnational processes</strong> on cities in general and the consequences of <strong>transnational relations</strong> between individuals, groups, firms, or institutions for cities in particular. We deemed it necessary to dedicate an entire issue to the phenomenon of <strong>transnationalism</strong> in relation to the city, to architecture, and its influence on cities in spatial as well as social, political, economical, and cultural terms, as these days, more than ever before, and due to the development of technologies that have made transportation and communication infinitely more accessib...</p> "Visionary Cities Project" applies urbanist archetypes to Damien Hirst's blank development site Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-04-10T14:58:00-04:00 >2015-04-15T12:38:53-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="268" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Students in UIC&rsquo;s &ldquo;Visionary Cities Project&rdquo; have pitted a selection of urbanist theories against one another, to see how historical visions of urbanism compare on a common ground. The studio, run by <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Alexander Eisenschmidt</a> at the University of Illinois at Chicago, takes urbanist models and schemes from the likes of Piranesis, Le Corbusier, and Hilberseimer, and reinterprets them on the blank slate of an upcoming development for the city of Ilfracombe, on the UK&rsquo;s southern coast. In reality, Ilfracombe&rsquo;s new district is being <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">developed by the artist Damien Hirst</a>, with a plan for suburban subdivisions. But the UIC studio is interpreting the expansion as a &ldquo;cultural instigator&rdquo;; producing a collection of drawings that Eisenschmidt calls&nbsp;&ldquo;HiDef Cities of Architectural Urbanism.&rdquo;</p><p>Eisenschmidt provided the following "Historical Context" for the studio:</p><p><em>Architectural urbanism has a long history, which only by the mid-20th century was questioned as the urbanisms of modernism were unable to re...</em></p> LA Gets its First Parking-Protected Bike Lanes Nicholas Korody 2015-04-07T17:26:00-04:00 >2015-04-13T20:29:32-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="475" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Yesterday, the city of Los Angeles installed its first ever&nbsp;parking-protected bike lanes. They&rsquo;re on Reseda Boulevard in Northridge, part of the mayor&rsquo;s Great Streets Initiative. As of this morning, the project is roughly one-quarter complete. The new protected lanes, also known as&nbsp;cycletracks, are mostly complete on the west side of Reseda Blvd from Plummer Street to Prairie Street. The full one-mile protected lanes will go from Plummer to Parthenia Street.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> A Couple Travels the World in Search of "the Human City" Nicholas Korody 2015-03-31T18:15:00-04:00 >2015-04-05T13:30:37-04:00 <img src="" width="300" height="180" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>...Fernando Casado and Paula Garc&iacute;a, the founders of the Towards the Human City project, [are] travelling the world to find how cities are trying to be more people-oriented...Trends like smart cities make us believe that large structures are needed to change urban spaces, yet there are countless examples of transformative bottom-up initiatives that have come from a simple idea and flourished without public money. It is this citizen-led type of urbanism that they hope to highlight and champion.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> Designing for the Night Nicholas Korody 2015-03-13T15:10:00-04:00 >2015-03-15T18:41:19-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="289" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>When I speak with a student about nightlife they have something different in mind than a 65-year old town planning manager. In the municipalities, finding contacts is difficult - often nobody feels responsible or capable of speaking. That should change.</p></em><br /><br /><p>There are sleepy cities and cities that never sleep. There are cities famed for their raucous nightlife, and others whose adolescent residents dream of leaving. According to the German urban scientist&nbsp;Jakob F. Schmid, interviewed for DW.DE, "Nightlife often defines the character of entire streets or districts." Schmid runs the&nbsp;"City After Eight - Management of the Urban Night Economy" project with Thomas Kr&uuml;ger, which is funded by the German government.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Looking at a variety of German cities including Berlin, Hamburg, and Frankfurt, the researchers mapped nightlife "with online recommendation platforms as the basis for the data." The hazy blue results indicate that various forms a city's nightlife may take. In the famed-party city Berlin, for example, hotspots are diffused throughout the expansive metropolis. In a traditional German city, on the other hand, the nightlife tends to be concentrated "on the city center, usually on the streets directly surrounding the center proper."</p><p>In the...</p> Was Rome really a "City of Marble"? Nicholas Korody 2015-03-09T16:38:00-04:00 >2015-03-15T16:02:41-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="364" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Architectural historian Diane Favro of [UCLA], has employed advanced modeling software to reconstruct the city of Rome in its entirety over the period of the rule of Augustus Caesar, from 44 B.C. to A.D. 14. According to legend, Augustus boasted, &ldquo;I found Rome a city of bricks and left it a city of marble&rdquo;... She found that only a small proportion of the buildings in Augustan Rome were converted from brick to marble, and that they would have been difficult to see from ground level.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Favro explains that while much of Rome was left untouched by Augustus' urban project, the traffic caused by bringing the large quantities of Carrera marble through the city likely created the illusion "that Rome had been transformed into marble."</p> San Francisco's Mid-Market neighborhood, a "corridor of shame?" Alexander Walter 2015-02-11T19:13:00-05:00 >2015-02-18T23:26:21-05:00 <img src="" width="400" height="600" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>&ldquo;This corridor of shame that I call Van Ness and Market is just a spectacular example of failed urban planning.&rdquo; [...] &ldquo;In the built environment, as one writer puts it, all our warts and our glories are there,&rdquo; says Paul Groth, an architectural historian at UC Berkeley. &ldquo;You can tell how we&rsquo;re treating our fellow humans in the built environment. It really is an autobiography.&rdquo; So, what does Groth think our current architecture says? &ldquo;Greed.&rdquo;</p></em><br /><br /><p>Related:&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">San Francisco is quick to poke fun of Sn&oslash;hetta's new One Van Ness tower design</a></p> Learning from Las Vegas: a look at the Strip through urban planning lenses Alexander Walter 2015-02-10T14:07:00-05:00 >2015-02-11T22:47:03-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="308" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Al describes CityCenter as the product of &ldquo;the Bilbao effect: the notion that buildings designed by celebrity architects bring in tourists, and in particular a higher-end type of visitor&rdquo;. MGM&rsquo;s version was to bring in name-brand architects such as Daniel Libeskind, Helmut Jahn and Norman Foster [...]. &ldquo;It goes against the casino design convention,&rdquo; Al says, &ldquo;by having towers that let in natural light and meet the street the way buildings do in other cities&rdquo; &ndash; with retail spaces, not gaming.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> What is Interior Urbanism? - A Review of MONU #21 by Claudia Mainardi and Giacomo Ardesio MAGAZINEONURBANISM 2015-01-26T13:04:00-05:00 >2015-02-02T21:17:44-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="386" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>In 1969 Reyner Banham in his book <a href=";redir_esc=y" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><strong>The Architecture of the Well-tempered Environment</strong></a> marked the shift between the concept of interior to that of an artificial environment. Technology and new human needs in fact had become an integral part of architecture, defining a new paradigm to describe indoor space, that it was not any longer a concern of the singular living-cell but rather of its internal atmosphere.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>The <strong><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">issue 21 of MONU</a></strong> describes the current development and the extreme consequences of what this Interior Urbanism means. As <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><em><strong>Brendan Cormier</strong></em></a><em> </em>emphasizes in his article <strong>Some Notes Towards an Interior Archipelago</strong>: &ldquo;90% of our lives are spent inside. Urban life is an interior affair.&rdquo; This statement manifests the necessity to invert the canonical approach to read and plan cities, unfolding a new possible stream of research which considers how architecture affects our everyday life.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Climate, or the need to erase the atmospheric conditions, is one of the trigger factors of the production o...</p> The Calvert Journal asks experts: How to fix Moscow? Alexander Walter 2015-01-22T14:42:00-05:00 >2015-01-22T14:43:21-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="335" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Big, brash, and full of energy, Moscow is a city that knows how to make an impression. But for all its attractions &mdash; world-class museums, clubs and rapidly transforming food scene, to name a few &mdash; its downsides are impossible to ignore. [...] This week, The Calvert Journal considers Moscow&rsquo;s prospects, consulting experts at the Moscow Urban Forum, looking in detail at two projects in the pipeline &mdash; VDNKh and Zaryadye Park &mdash; and checking out some neighbourhoods that are already going places.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> Infographic: the cheapest and most expensive countries to live in Nicholas Korody 2015-01-19T13:31:00-05:00 >2015-01-20T15:28:30-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>This map shows the difference in living costs around the world using figures from the world's largest database of user contributed data about cities and countries worldwide. The Consumer Price Index, used to determine the difference in the living costs between countries takes into account the prices of groceries, transportation, restaurants and utilities. The CPI in the infographic is a relative indicator of a country's living costs compared to New York.</p></em><br /><br /><p>The top five cheapest countries are: India, Nepal, Pakistan, Tunisia, and Algeria.</p><p>The most expensive countries are: Switzerland, Norway, Venezuela, Iceland, and Denmark.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p> Buzzwords explained: “Urban Metabolism” Alexander Walter 2014-12-23T15:09:00-05:00 >2014-12-27T17:52:39-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="353" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>In the past two years, Yale&rsquo;s Journal of Industrial Ecology has published a special issue devoted to &ldquo;urban metabolism for the urban century&rdquo; and a paper on &ldquo;an urban metabolism approach to Los Angeles.&rdquo; Clearly, certain precincts of academia are abuzz about this concept. And if still another recent paper &mdash; &ldquo;Mainstreaming Urban Metabolism&rdquo; &mdash; has any sway, the term could become as familiar in urban circles as &ldquo;resilience&rdquo; and &ldquo;Vision Zero.&rdquo; But what exactly does it mean?</p></em><br /><br /><p>Got an appetite for more architectural buzzwords and the industry's bizarre lingo? Get your fix with the ongoing&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Archinect's Lexicon</a> series.</p> Architecture Won’t Save the World: “Tactical Urbanisms” at MoMA (...or will it?) Alexander Walter 2014-11-26T14:18:00-05:00 >2014-11-29T14:00:30-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="305" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>&ldquo;Uneven Growth: Tactical Urbanisms for Expanding Megacities&rdquo; is, at least nominally, about urbanism and architecture. [...] The problems, not the solutions, presented in &ldquo;Uneven Growth&rdquo; are very real. Before Gadanho and his teams of architects, planners, and researchers can suggest productive solutions, they would do well to acknowledge that their fellow practitioners hold responsibility for the very state of urban affairs they seek to remedy.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Previously:&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">MoMA's &ldquo;Uneven Growth&rdquo; case studies conclude with exhibition this month</a></p> MoMA's “Uneven Growth” case studies conclude with exhibition this month Justine Testado 2014-11-13T13:03:00-05:00 >2014-11-26T14:22:44-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="257" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>MoMA began its "Uneven Growth: Tactical Urbanisms for Expanding Megacities" initiative last year aiming to advance international discussion on disproportionate urban development and its potential consequences. To address this issue, six interdisciplinary teams spent 14 months in workshops designing proposals that investigate new architectural possibilities for six metropolises. Each case study will be exhibited to the public at MoMA starting on November 22.</p></em><br /><br /><p>But the discussion doesn't end there. MoMA also created a user-generated <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Tumblr</a> that collects examples of emerging modes of tactical urbanism taking place in the six cities.</p><p>Here's a glimpse:</p><p><strong>LAGOS</strong><br>By NL&Eacute; (Lagos, Nigeria and Amsterdam, Netherlands)<br>Zoohaus/Inteligencias Colectivas (Madrid, Spain)</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><strong>HONG KONG</strong><br>By MAP Office (Hong Kong, China)<br>Network Architecture Lab (Columbia University, New York, U.S.)</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><strong>ISTANBUL</strong><br>By Superpool (Istanbul, Turkey)<br>Atelier d&rsquo;Architecture Autog&eacute;r&eacute;e (Paris, France)</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><strong>MUMBAI</strong><br>By URBZ: user-generated cities (Mumbai, India)<br>Ensamble Studio/MIT-POPlab (Madrid, Spain and Cambridge, U.S.)</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><strong>RIO DE JANEIRO</strong><br>By RUA Arquitetos (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil)<br>MAS Urban Design at ETH (Zurich, Switzerland)</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><strong>NEW YORK</strong><br>By SITU Studio (New York, U.S.)<br>Cohabitation Strategies (CohStra) (Rotterdam, Netherlands AND New York, U.S.)</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>For further details and images from each case study, head over to <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Bustler</a>.</p>