Archinect - News 2015-11-25T22:19:12-05:00 Seattle's massive Bertha tunnel drill is up for repair, but still faces a shaky outlook Justine Testado 2015-04-07T16:25:00-04:00 >2015-04-14T10:45:52-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="411" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Megaprojects almost always fall short of their promises&mdash;costing too much, delivering underwhelming benefits, or both. Yet...cities still fall for them, seduced by new technologies and the lure of the perfect fix. A mix of factors has given Seattle a particularly acute sense of angst. The project depends on a singular piece of engineering. And Bertha&rsquo;s building a highway for cars in a city where workers overcrowd buses and commuters wrap themselves in waterproof everything to bike in the rain.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Bedecked with amusingly cutesy illustrations, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Bloomberg</a> tells the exasperating tale of the giant tunnel drill dubbed <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Bertha</a>, which began digging the new State Route 99 tunnel underneath downtown Seattle in summer 2013 to replace the current street-level Alaskan Way Viaduct and ideally clear up the city's waterfront for a park. Named after Seattle's only female mayor Bertha Knight Landes, Bertha is reportedly the world's biggest tunnel drill at five stories tall, built with a 25,000-horsepower motor, 260 steel teeth, and has an $80 million price tag.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""><br><em>Bertha near completion back in 2012 before its shipment to Seattle</em>.</p><p>But in December 2013 after digging through about 1,000 feet, Bertha's seals busted from increasing temperatures and grit clogged up its teeth, so, it broke. Debate amongst Seattleites ensued. What the hell will happen to Big Bertha now? The project was originally <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">scheduled</a> to be done this November.</p><p>Last week, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Washington State</a>'s contractor Seattle Tunnel Partners safely haul...</p> "The Hole Idea" celebrates the simple joys of creating "spontaneous architecture" Justine Testado 2015-04-01T15:16:00-04:00 >2015-04-01T15:19:24-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="342" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Architectural design can be as playful as a child's imagination and still be taken seriously. Coated in a sunny yellow and candy-colored circular openings, "The Hole Idea -- Now in Technicolor" in Winnipeg is a snow tunnel that may seem like a kids-only zone at first glance, but is an engaging installation that can spark the curiosity of anyone who is trudging by in the snow. Since it was first installed in January after winning the popular <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Warming Huts 2015 competition</a>, The Hole Idea has attracted visitors of all ages. The project's success continues with its recent win of an Ontario Association Of Architects Award.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Designed by Toronto-based <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Weiss Architecture + Urbanism</a>, the playful concept for The Hole Idea -- which was named after a 1955 Looney Tune animation of the same name -- evokes childhood memories of Saturday morning cartoons, colorful playgrounds, and building snow forts.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>The firm worked alongside Blackwell Engineering and the Canada Culvert fabrication team to complete th...</p> Gensler proposes "Underline" bike paths in London's abandoned tube tunnels Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-02-05T13:47:00-05:00 >2015-02-12T19:14:48-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="308" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Could the answer to London&rsquo;s congestion be a network of subterranean cycleways? A new project from design firm Gensler suggests that maybe &ndash; just maybe &ndash; it might. Dubbed the London Underline, the project would turn London&rsquo;s abandoned tube tunnels into living streets beneath the city. [...] London Underline is being taken seriously enough in some quarters. Earlier this week, it won the Best Conceptual Project gong at the London Planning awards.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> Geology and the Art of New York City Subway Construction Alexander Walter 2014-11-03T13:27:00-05:00 >2014-11-05T17:40:46-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="122" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The Second Avenue Subway is the stuff of legend in New York City, the locomotive who cried wolf. Plagued by funding shortages, the project has been stop-and-go since the 1920s. Now construction is back to go; in late September, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) [...] requested $1.5 billion [...]. Michael Horodniceanu, head of construction for the MTA, has stated that the long-awaited line may be ready by 2029. In the meantime, the MTA is learning about, and acting on, geology.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Related: <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">NYC Can't Afford to Build the Second Avenue Subway, and It Can't Afford Not To</a></p> Report highlights vulnerability of Amtrak’s NYC tunnels Alexander Walter 2014-10-02T13:49:00-04:00 >2014-10-08T23:02:37-04:00 <img src="" width="300" height="198" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>A new engineering report assessing the damage caused to the Amtrak-owned Hudson River and East River tunnels in New York City by Superstorm Sandy in October 2012 recommends a phased process of maintenance works, which will require taking individual tunnel tubes out of service for extended periods.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> Editor's Picks #344 Nam Henderson 2013-12-03T18:49:00-05:00 >2013-12-04T11:09:32-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="303" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>eric chavkin penned a review of "Glen Small: Recovery Room" an exhibit at Assembly in Los Angeles, organized and curated by Archinect's own Orhan Ayy&uuml;ce. MightyMike (aka Michael Locke) commented "For local (Los Angeles) fans of Archinect, there's a wonderful example of Small's work in the Franklin Hills...the Leiberman House". For his part davidd felt "This review and Small's work seems to come from an ingroup/niche point of view".</p></em><br /><br /><p> <strong>eric chavkin</strong> penned <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">a review of "Glen Small: Recovery Room" an exhibit at Assembly in Los Angeles</a>,&nbsp;organized and curated by Archinect's own <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Orhan Ayy&uuml;ce</a>.&nbsp;He concluded "<em>Despite the flaws the works of Glen Small offer so much that another architect could base an entire career on re-doing, modifying, repeating any one of his single works</em>".</p> <p> <strong>MightyMike</strong> (aka Michael Locke) commented "<em>For local (Los Angeles) fans of Archinect, there's a wonderful example of Small's work in the Franklin Hills...the Leiberman House, designed by Glen Howard Small, AIA c.1989 and completed by Anthony Eckelberry&nbsp; in 1995</em>".&nbsp;For his part <strong>davidd</strong> felt "<em>This review and Small's work seems to come from an ingroup/niche point of view</em>".</p> <p> <img alt="" src=""></p> <p> Plus, in latest edition of the series <strong>Working out of the Box</strong>, Archinect spoke with with <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Microsoft Design Leads Mary-Lynne Williams and Moneta Ho Kushner</a>.</p> <p> <br><strong>News</strong><br><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Brian Henry</a>&nbsp;noted <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">a move by Ohio towards banning LEED</a>.&nbsp;<strong>katscan</strong> thought "<em>It sure is about time, I was wondering why stat...</em></p> Crossrail: Britain's biggest archaeological dig will transform London Archinect 2013-11-25T20:21:00-05:00 >2013-12-02T22:51:07-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="358" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Crossrail is not just about engineering: artists, designers and archaeologists are all involved in the &pound;15bn new railway. As the amazing tunnel-boring machines approach halfway, Rowan Moore dons his hard hat and goes below</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> How Engineers Are Building a New Railroad Under New York City Archinect 2013-05-28T15:13:00-04:00 >2013-05-28T15:14:09-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="374" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The biggest public transit infrastructure effort in the US is almost completely invisible &mdash; unless you&rsquo;re 160 feet underground. The East Side Access project will connect the Long Island Railroad to New York&rsquo;s Grand Central Terminal via a massive tunnel under the East River. Actually, that tunnel was the easy part; it was started in 1969. The hard part? &ldquo;We are building a brand-new railroad here,&rdquo; says Michael Horodniceanu, president of Metropolitan Transit Authority Capital Construction.</p></em><br /><br /><p> Beautiful photographs by Dean Kaufman. To view more of his photos from this story, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">go to his website</a>.</p>