Archinect - News 2015-11-27T19:33:03-05:00 Editor's Picks #421 Nam Henderson 2015-06-24T09:24:00-04:00 >2015-06-24T12:07:27-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="303" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Amelia Taylor-Hochberg</a>&nbsp;penned <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">What makes an artless museum?</a>,&nbsp;which reviewed the February Sky-lit event/preview of the new Broad Museum.&nbsp;Therein she argues that it provided "<em>an opportunity for the architecture to be treated as a relational art object, but not so it could be handled with velvet gloves</em>".&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Chris Teeter</a>&nbsp;commented "<em>great article, it's worth 2 or 3 reads&hellip;</em>" <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Donna Sink</a>&nbsp;wrote "<em>A meaty essay...on the Broad Museum (meat, contraceptive sponges, art, raw spectacle: it's a big topic</em>"</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Plus, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Julia Ingalls</a>&nbsp;explored the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Role of Software vs. Vision in Architectural Employment</a>.&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Derek Kaplan</a>&nbsp;thought it was a "<em>Great article on a topic that needs more discussion.</em>"<br>&nbsp;</p><p><strong>News</strong></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Charles Correa, named "<em>India&rsquo;s Greatest Architect</em>"&nbsp;by RIBA, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">died</a> at 84.&nbsp;<strong>jla-x</strong> eulogized "<em>He was pretty great. &nbsp;I studied his residential developments extensively as a student...He will be missed</em>".</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Despite recovering from several major surgeries for cancer, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Tadao Ando spoke with </a><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">NHK World</a><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"> about</a>; recent projects, the durability of...</p> Charles Correa, legendary Indian architect, dies at 84 Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-06-17T13:43:00-04:00 >2015-06-17T15:14:19-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="342" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Born in 1930 in the southern Indian city of Secunderabad, Mr. Correa studied at St. Xavier&rsquo;s College in Mumbai and then went on to attend theUniversity of Michigan and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the U.S. to study architecture. &ldquo;To work in India is the great advantage of life in the Third World. The issues are so much bigger than you are; they give you a chance to grow,&rdquo; Mr. Correa wrote in his book &lsquo;Housing and Urbanization.&rsquo;</p></em><br /><br /><p>Charles Correa died at home Tuesday night in Mumbai, after a bout of brief illness (according to&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">BBC news</a>). He is known for the diversity and far-reaching quality of his work in India and elsewhere, including affordable housing, master planning, and high-profile academic and diplomatic structures. In 2013,&nbsp;RIBA named him "India's Greatest Architect".&nbsp;Up until his death, he served as a consulting architect with the Goa government in India.&nbsp;</p><p>After studying at St. Xavier's College in Mumbai, Correa earned architecture degrees from the University of Michigan and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.&nbsp;Some of his best known architectural works include the Mahatma Gandhi Memorial in Ahmedabad, the Kanchanjunga Apartment tower in Mumbai, MIT's Brain and Cognitive Sciences Center in Boston, and the Parumala Church, as well as his master planning work for Navi Mumbai in the 1960s.</p><p>RIP Charles Correa, 1930-2015</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>&uarr;&nbsp;<em>British Council, Delhi</em></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>&uarr;&nbsp;<em>Mahatma Gandhi Memorial, Ahmedabad</em></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>&uarr;&nbsp;<em>Kanchanjunga Apartm...</em></p> "Great City...Terrible Place": A discussion on the urban future of India Laura Amaya 2015-03-27T14:00:00-04:00 >2015-04-05T00:03:24-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="341" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>India is currently the second most populated country in the world, closely following China, at 1.25 billion people. Around 30 percent of its inhabitants, roughly the population of the entire United States, live in urban areas that continue to grow. The astonishing numbers are proof of the country&rsquo;s demographic explosion, and make Indian cities a fascinating combination of chaos and vitality rarely found elsewhere. Great City&hellip;Terrible Place, this year&rsquo;s Z-AXIS symposium curated by the Charles Correa Foundation in Goa, explored the complex forces shaping global cities in an effort to understand the dynamism of India&rsquo;s ever-changing urban centers. Held over three days at Kala Academy, one of Correa&rsquo;s masterworks, the conference brought together speakers from different corners of the world to share their views with an audience eager to take an active role in India&rsquo;s urban transformation.</p><p>The conference&rsquo;s moderator, Pratyush Shankar, described cities as places of will, where people forge ...</p> uncube talks to Charles Correa Archinect 2013-07-01T18:55:00-04:00 >2013-10-16T11:29:07-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="708" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>When Charles Correa was recently in London for the opening of his RIBA exhibition, Rob Wilson spoke with him about some of the key ideas, influences and recurrent themes in his work throughout his long career.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> Charles Correa's influence and style Nam Henderson 2013-05-14T10:17:00-04:00 >2013-05-16T02:33:51-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="288" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>His eye-catching buildings have helped define the architecture of post-independence India.</p></em><br /><br /><p> A new exhibition at the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Royal Institute of British Architects in London</a> - which has been gifted Correa's archive - celebrates his decades-long career. The BBC's took a look with the designer, fellow architect David Adjaye.</p> Correa, Maki Tapped to Design Aga Khan Center Aaron Plewke 2008-10-07T09:48:00-04:00 >2013-07-01T19:01:46-04:00 <img src="" width="500" height="250" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p> One of the world&rsquo;s great architecture patrons has hired two distinguished architects&mdash;the Indian Modernist <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Charles Correa</a> and Pritzker Prize winner <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Fumihiko Maki</a>&mdash;to design a $200-million cultural and religious complex in Toronto. <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">ArchRecord</a> | <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Slideshow</a></p>