Archinect - News 2014-09-01T14:55:57-04:00 http://archinect.com/news/article/93084470/chicago-spire-developer-wants-to-resume-project Chicago Spire developer wants to resume project Archinect 2014-02-07T17:52:00-05:00 >2014-02-11T14:32:42-05:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/ge/geev88pohms7ilgn.jpg" width="514" height="585" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The Irish developer behind the Chicago Spire said it has found an investor to pay its creditors, allowing it to emerge from bankruptcy and possibly restart work on the long-stalled residential project.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/loose.dtd"> <html><head><meta></head></html> http://archinect.com/news/article/81208741/vanity-height-the-use-less-space-in-today-s-tallest Vanity Height: the Use-less Space in Today’s Tallest Alexander Walter 2013-09-06T12:49:00-04:00 >2013-09-09T18:47:24-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/vm/vm28bkpcyxksyaxv.jpg" width="514" height="334" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>We noticed in Journal 2013 Issue I&rsquo;s case study on Kingdom Tower, Jeddah, that a fair amount of the top of the building seemed to be an unoccupied spire. This prompted us to investigate the increasing trend towards extreme spires and other extensions of tall buildings that do not enclose usable space, and create a new term to describe this &ndash; Vanity Height, i.e., the distance between a skyscraper&rsquo;s highest occupiable floor and its architectural top, as determined by CTBUH Height Criteria.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/loose.dtd"> <html><head><meta></head></html> http://archinect.com/news/article/72365496/watch-the-spire-travel-to-the-top-of-one-world-trade-center Watch The Spire Travel to the Top of One World Trade Center sara@curbed 2013-05-02T17:20:00-04:00 >2013-05-08T02:31:06-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/0a/0ajo2tjbmuuzdmuq.jpg" width="514" height="350" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>After traveling from Newark to New York City via barge in December and waiting a while for clear weather, the spire finally made its way to the top of One World Trade Center this morning. The project isn't quite finished&mdash;sections 17 and 18 of the spire were raised to a temporary work platform and will be installed by ironworkers later&mdash;but Curbed video editor David Sherwin headed downtown this morning to watch the spire's hoisting. Take a look.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/loose.dtd"> <html><head><meta></head></html>