Archinect - News 2015-10-07T02:48:37-04:00 Sydney architecture intern underpaid almost $7000 Nicholas Korody 2015-03-18T15:49:00-04:00 >2015-03-23T22:27:01-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="368" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>A student was underpaid almost $7000 during an internship with a Sydney firm of architects, a Fair Work Ombudsman investigation has found. The student was completing a masters degree in architecture when he was paid $12 per hour for six months of full-time work. His duties included architectural drawing, consulting with clients and and conducting site visits...the student, aged in his 20s,... was short-changed $6830.</p></em><br /><br /><p>According to Australian labor laws, the student was performing work that was not part of his architectural education and should have received minimum wage payment. Australia's minimum wage is $16.88 (in comparison, the US minimum wage is currently $7.25/hr) and after the student's graduation his payment should have risen to&nbsp;$21.19 an hour.</p><p>This news is the latest in a gathering storm surrounding the abuse of intern labor in architecture and other fields. For example, former interns at the publisher Cond&eacute; Nast recently won a <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">lawsuit </a>against the firm, collecting a total of&nbsp;$5.8 million for unpaid labor (divided among 7,500 people).&nbsp;</p><p>The issue is part of a larger, systematic problem that inhibits young people at the nascence of their careers. In conjunction with the massive loans need to get educated, un- and underpaid internships are an impossible burden to shoulder for many aspiring architects, yet are often presented as a normal and necessary aspect of getting into the profession. For...</p> Is unpaid work ever legal? Brian Newman, Archinect Sessions' Legal Correspondent, answers the question. Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-01-13T18:47:00-05:00 >2015-01-14T20:52:03-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="331" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Need legal advice? Sure you do, all architects could use some. <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Archinect Sessions</a> is proud to have&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Brian Newman</a>&nbsp;of&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Dykema Gossett PLLC</a>&nbsp;as our official legal correspondent, offering insight into the legal quagmire of architectural practice. Brian is a regular guest on the podcast, dishing out info on internships, how to negotiate a contract, and when to take things to court. We've extracted his segments to better focus directly on his wisdom.</p><p>Brian made his podcasting debut on <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Episode #10</a>, Powers of 10 with Christopher Hawthorne, architecture critic at the <em>LA Times</em>. In that episode, Paul spoke with Brian about when unpaid work is legal (and when it certainly isn't). Listen to their conversation below:</p><p></p><p>Click <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">here</a> to listen on SoundCloud if the track above isn't playable.</p><p>Want to ask Brian something specifically, or suggest a future topic for him to cover on the podcast? Send your legal questions to us via email at <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"></a>, through <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Twitter</a> #archinectsessions, or leave a mess...</p> Pei Partnership sues National Slavery Museum for... get this... not getting paid for their services Archinect 2013-01-25T14:12:00-05:00 >2013-01-25T19:35:07-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="316" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The National Slavery Museum, which was spearheaded by former Virginia Gov. Doug Wilder, never paid Pei for the architectural work. Pei says it is owed more than $6 million, money that the firm hopes to recoup in an eventual sale of the 38 acres. The slavery museum organization now owes more than $300,000 in delinquent real estate taxes to Fredericksburg. The city has begun the lengthy legal process of selling the land at auction to recoup the back taxes.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html>