Archinect - News 2015-12-01T04:24:09-05:00 How one urban planner is helping revamp a Miami suburb "without gentrification" Justine Testado 2015-11-10T20:20:00-05:00 >2015-11-17T23:27:48-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Germane Barnes wants Opa-Locka to be known for something else...He knows [change] can happen because he lives there, and has seen the work of a group of artists and organizers slowly change the landscape...The city's history intrigued him, not merely because it seemed like a perfect case study for his thesis about revitalizing a community without gentrification, but because it also spoke to his own experiences.</p></em><br /><br /><p>More on Archinect:</p><p><a title="In Chicago, forming economically integrated suburbs is more complex than it looks" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">In Chicago, forming economically integrated suburbs is more complex than it looks</a></p><p><a title="Welcome to Evanston, Illinois: the carless suburbia" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Welcome to Evanston, Illinois: the carless suburbia</a></p><p><a title="Berliners are getting their hopes up for transformed Kulturforum arts district" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Berliners are getting their hopes up for transformed Kulturforum arts district</a></p><p><a title="With a little compromise, illegal urban squats like Ljubljana's Metelkova Mesto can do a city good" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">With a little compromise, illegal urban squats like Ljubljana's Metelkova Mesto can do a city good</a></p> The BEACH to be reincarnated in arts competition for D.C.'s Dupont Underground initiative Justine Testado 2015-09-01T12:55:00-04:00 >2015-09-01T15:38:06-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>The wildly successful BEACH installation is down to its final exhibition days at Washington D.C.'s National Building Museum. Since <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">opening on July 4</a>, over 120,000 visitors both young and old "splashed" around in its bubbly waters, lounged about on the "shore", and perhaps saw a live band rock out in the 10,000 square-foot monochromatic ball pit, designed by Brooklyn-based <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Snarkitecture</a>. Although the Beach closes on September 7, that won't be the last of it.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Recycling the Beach was always part of the plan. Even before the installation opened, representatives of the D.C.-based initiative, the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Dupont Underground</a>, proposed&nbsp;to transport, store, and re-use its building materials.</p><p>The Dupont Underground has set&nbsp;its sights on revitalizing&nbsp;an abandoned trolley station beneath the Dupont Circle neighborhood into a public venue for arts and design-oriented events. As part of their inaugural programming, the group will take the Beach's more than 650,000 anti-microbial plastic balls and its 6,000 ...</p> Gehry to prioritize hydrology in LA River revitalization strategy Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-08-10T19:04:00-04:00 >2015-08-20T02:31:14-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="289" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Gehry insists that he isn't interested in the river as the site for new landmarks. He says he told the Revitalization Corp. board members who first visited his office last year that he would take on the job only if he could look at the river primarily in terms of hydrology. [...] "I told them I'm not a landscape guy. I said I would only do it on the condition that they approached it as a water-reclamation project, to deal with all the water issues first."</p></em><br /><br /><p>Following up on last week's news that <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Gehry had been attached to the LA River redevelopment strategy</a>, a few more details have surfaced &ndash; no distinct plans yet, but an overall approach has emerged. Summed up by Christopher Hawthorne, the&nbsp;<em>LA Times'</em>&nbsp;architecture critic, the plan is: "Gehry thinks [the LA River] could be turned into an entirely different kind of machine, one that could store and even treat storm water."</p><p>In the 1930s, the riverbed was coated in concrete by the Army Corps of Engineers to manage stormwater flooding, and has since turned the river into a piece of civic infrastructure foremost, a public space second. With that traditional understanding of the river's utility,&nbsp;Gehry's approach "stresses how little sense it makes to prohibit the public from using the river or its banks when risk of flooding is low &mdash; which means the vast majority of the time."</p><p>At least by that note, it appears Gehry's plan for the river will not push waterfront residential development at the expe...</p> Follow the yellow wooden road into Rotterdam's new Luchtsingel pedestrian park Justine Testado 2015-07-14T19:46:00-04:00 >2015-07-18T14:01:20-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Rotterdam recently welcomed <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">The Luchtsingel</a>, a communal endeavor to spruce up the long-neglected Hofplein neighborhood in the heart of the city. Locally based architecture practice <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Zones Urbaines Sensibles</a> (ZUS) devised The Luchtsingel in 2011. The focal point of the emerging "three-dimensional cityscape" is a nearly 400-meter wooden pedestrian bridge that was largely built from crowdsourced funds, accompanied by a network of refurbished public spaces.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>"<em>Based on the idea of Permanent Temporality, the Luchtsingel introduces a new way of [city-making]. This means using the city's evolutionary character and existing forms as a starting point. Therefore, we have developed new instruments for design, financing, and planning,</em>" said ZUS partner Elma van Boxel in a statement.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>The project gained traction when ZUS set up the "I Make Rotterdam" crowdfunding campaign for the bridge. The campaign sold over 8,000 boards painted in a&nbsp;hard-to-ignore shade of yellow inscribed with the supporter's name...</p> About Detroit's too often skewed media coverage Alexander Walter 2015-01-12T14:25:00-05:00 >2015-01-12T15:27:43-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>In Detroit, the American Dream has become an American Paradox: Corporate-backed revitalization downtown belies the continued deterioration of sprawling neighborhoods of single-family homes; [...] white newcomers trickle in by choice, just as many black natives have no choice but to stay where they are. What&rsquo;s that? It doesn&rsquo;t sound like the up-from-the-ashes, post-industrial renaissance Detroit you&rsquo;ve been hearing about of late?</p></em><br /><br /><p>For more about Detroit, take a listen to episode 11 of Archinect Sessions, and our chat with Mitch McEwen:</p><p></p> New map tool reveals NYC's vacant lots zoned for revitalization Diane Pham 2014-11-11T11:46:00-05:00 >2014-11-11T11:46:54-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="330" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Developed with the help of a team of volunteer researchers, urban planners and designers, this new online tool allows anyone to view the staggering amount of publicly-owned lots that once had an urban renewal plan in the pipeline but were scrapped due to bureaucracy. By mapping out all of the vacant spaces across the city, 596 hopes that we as a community can take a top-down approach to turning these urban blights into public gardens, play lots, and spaces where people can &ldquo;co-create.&rdquo;</p></em><br /><br /><p>From 1949-1974 NYC took on an urban renewal project that resulted in the bulldozing of "slums" across Manhattan. The vast majority of the proposals planned for the land floundered and today nearly 15,000 lots across the city lay vacant. 596 Acres, a grassroots land access nonprofit, had developed a map tool called Urban Reviewer that pinpoints all of these spots&mdash;most owned by the public&mdash;already zoned for action.&nbsp;</p> Feds Okay $1-Billion Los Angeles River Project Alexander Walter 2014-05-29T12:46:00-04:00 >2014-05-29T15:22:42-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="334" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The jury is in and the Los Angeles River's future seems to be bright. After more than six months of intense lobbying by the city, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Army Corps) has announced that it will be recommending a more ambitious $1-billion plan to restore an 11-mile stretch of the Los Angeles River from downtown through Elysian Park.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> Now on auction in Detroit: Homes starting at $1,000 Alexander Walter 2014-05-19T13:57:00-04:00 >2014-05-19T15:48:58-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="388" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>No absentee landlords or faraway investors allowed. Only Michigan residents and businesses [...] The idea is to lure neighbors, not investors or opportunists (#NeighborsWanted is the city's hashtag for the program). And that does not include out-of-state urban homesteaders dreaming of cheap property in Detroit. Right now, the land bank is focusing on otherwise intact neighborhoods, as opposed to those parts of town where vacant parcels outnumber the residents who've stuck around.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> Post-Katrina: Will New Orleans still be New Orleans? Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2014-04-25T19:33:00-04:00 >2014-04-28T17:54:18-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>With billions in federal, charity and insurance dollars flowing in after [Hurricane Katrina], there were suddenly resources for change. &ldquo;The city essentially got the opportunity to do a do-over,&rdquo; said Carol Bebelle, a lifelong New Orleanian and executive director of Ash&eacute; Cultural Arts Center. [...] In many ways, it was a top-to-bottom re-imagining of the cityscape. So, is the city in a better place than it was nearly nine years ago? It depends on how closely you look.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> NYC chief city planner Amanda Burden on public space and densification Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2014-04-21T13:07:00-04:00 >2014-04-21T16:28:18-04:00 <img src="" width="376" height="600" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>If there is any one lesson that I have learned in my life as a city planner, it is that public spaces have power. It's not just the number of people using them, it's the even greater number of people who feel better about their city just knowing that they are there. Public space can change how you live in a city, how you feel about a city, whether you choose one city over another, and public space is one of the most important reasons why you stay in a city.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Amanda Burden served as New York City's chief planner under Mayor Bloomberg, leading such revitalization projects as the High Line and Brooklyn's waterfront. You can watch the full TED talk below, or read the complete transcript <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">here</a>.</p> In Atlanta, Two Stadiums Collide With Dreams of a New Downtown Alexander Walter 2014-02-21T14:45:00-05:00 >2014-02-24T18:35:09-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="289" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Over the next few years, two professional sports teams are in a position to radically reshape much of the fringe of Atlanta's downtown core. [...] Neither stadium deal has been the public relations coup that Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed surely hoped for. [...] There's an inherent messiness to these dual, competing narratives &ndash; one of downtown reinvestment, the other a triumph of the suburbs.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> Will Zappos turn downtown Las Vegas into the next Silicon Valley? Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2014-01-21T13:28:00-05:00 >2014-01-27T19:28:39-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="350" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Late in 2011, [Zappos CEO] Hsieh became even more legendary by announcing almost larkishly that he&rsquo;d be leading a $350 million effort to rejuvenate a blighted stretch of Las Vegas&rsquo; downtown [&hellip;] His plan was to spend much of his own personal fortune to transform this lifeless area about a mile north of the neon blitz of the Strip into an entrepreneurial tech nirvana. [...] Doubters have no place in the ecosystem. Pragmatists stand little chance. A love of hyperbole prevails.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> Five Teams Shortlisted in Syracuse’s “Movement on Main” Competition Alexander Walter 2013-01-09T15:11:00-05:00 >2013-01-14T20:19:12-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="342" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Five design teams have been named to receive $15,000 grants to revitalize Syracuse's Near Westside neighborhood as part of the "Movement on Main: Designing the Healthy Main Street" competition. The initiative, sponsored by Syracuse University, plans to redesign the area around Wyoming Street to once again make it an important agent of the community's social and recreational life.</p></em><br /><br /><p> &nbsp;Three teams were chosen from the submissions in the first round of the competition:</p> <ul><li> Coen + Partners, Inc. (Minneapolis, MN)</li> <li> Stoss Landscape Urbanism (Boston, MA) with H&ouml;weler + Yoon Architecture, LLP, Nitsch Engineering, Inc., and Dr. Angie Cradock, Sc. D.</li> <li> King and King Architects (Syracuse, NY) with Urban Movement Design and The Alchemical Nursery</li> </ul><p> Two teams had previously been invited as preselected participants:</p> <ul><li> Marpillero Pollak Architects (New York, NY) with Arup, Consulting Engineers, Nelson Byrd Woltz Landscape Architects, and HealthxDesign</li> <li> peg office of landscape + architecture (Philadelphia, PA) with Sp(a)de Architecture and Barton &amp; Loguidice, P.C. Engineering</li> </ul>