Archinect - News 2015-11-26T05:40:18-05:00 Bonus Session: Reflections on "Shelter" in Los Angeles Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-11-20T14:49:00-05:00 >2015-11-20T19:41:23-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>We're pleased to announce a special bonus episode of <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Archinect Sessions</a>, featuring a live recording of the closing panel discussion for&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">"Shelter" at the Architecture + Design Museum in Los Angeles.</a></p><p>To close out the exhibition on November 6, curators Sam Lubell and Danielle Rago hosted two panel discussions with the featured architects, focusing on the sites that serve as the exhibition's organizing principles: the Metro subway extension in front of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the stretch of the LA River running through the city proper. Both sites embody much of what is affecting Los Angeles' changing urbanism &ndash; ongoing drought, invigorated public transportation, gentrification, and increasing density.</p><p>Mimi Zeiger, West Coast Editor of The Architect's Newspaper moderated the panel on the River, with Jimenez Lai (Bureau Spectacular), Elizabeth Timme (LA-M&aacute;s), and Lorcan O'Herlihy (Lorcan O'Herlihy Architects), and I moderated the panel on Metro, with Jennifer Marmon (PAR),...</p> Op-Ed: Architect Magazine Finally Found its Voice Keith Zawistowski 2012-11-28T03:04:00-05:00 >2012-12-03T19:04:29-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="621" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p> I recently received my November Issue of <em>Architect</em> and for the first time since the blogs caused us all to begin devouring images at warp speed and sent print media into a battle for survival, I actually "read" an architecture magazine. It was truly satisfying.</p> <p> From its inception, the idea behind <em>Architect</em> was clear; its title was the proof. <em>Architectural Record</em> had lost touch. It had become a glossy product placement catalog, serving its advertisers but increasingly bereft of intellectual rigor. <em>Architect</em> promised to peel back the facade of idealized pre-occupancy images and to share the stories of the people who make architecture: to deliver us process and ideas. The bar was high and so were many of our expectations. Perhaps that is why I have been so underwhelmed as <em>Architect</em> has struggled for nearly 7 years to find a voice. The magazine has taken us on a journey from in-depth interviews of firms producing irrelevant projects, to garnish cartoony graphics that distracted from...</p>