Archinect - News 2015-11-27T10:30:59-05:00 "The Other Architect" explores alternative practices and radical research projects Nicholas Korody 2015-10-27T15:59:00-04:00 >2015-11-05T00:36:11-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="274" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>For as long as architecture has been reduced to a service to society or an &ldquo;industry&rdquo; whose ultimate goal is only to build, there have been others who imagine it instead as a field of intellectual research: energetic, critical, and radical. But how can we produce or maintain this position?</p></em><br /><br /><p><em>The Other Architect</em>, an expansive exhibition that considers "architecture&rsquo;s potential to identify the urgent issues of our time" through&nbsp;twenty-three case studies from the 1960s to the present, opens tomorrow at the Canadian Centre for Architecture (CCA) in Montreal.<br><br>Curated by Giovanna Borasi, the exhibition looks at various groups that have sought to critically intervene in the architectural profession, as well as to mobilize architectural thinking towards an expanded field. If the "normal architect" works within established conditions and using a defined toolset, these "other architects" developed (or borrowed) new methodologies, experimented formally and conceptually, and sought alternative organizational structures.<br><br><img title="" alt="" src=""><br><br>Architecture witnessed a proliferation of radical experiments beginning in the mid-20th century, resulting in outputs in a variety of a media, such as pamphlets, manifestos, videos, questionnaires, and books. In the exhibition, the material is organized in thematic ga...</p> WIRED on the 'Future' of Architecture Alexander Walter 2015-04-06T13:42:00-04:00 >2015-04-13T20:41:40-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="386" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>As Kushner sees it, the advent of social media changed architecture in the same way it has changed other industries. It&rsquo;s a real time barometer for how the public feels about any given project. He sees this as a good thing. The beauty and frustration of architecture is that it&rsquo;s unavoidable; we&rsquo;re all stakeholders, even if we don&rsquo;t want to be. In the past, the voices of only a select group of these stakeholders would be heard. Today, anyone with an internet connection can be a casual critic.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> Aaron Betsky To Lead Taliesin West Orhan Ayyüce 2015-01-25T19:10:00-05:00 >2015-01-30T13:52:52-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>&ldquo;I look forward to continuing the tradition of experimental architecture he did so much to define.&rdquo;</p></em><br /><br /><p>Betsky seems to be the man of the hour these days, writing popularly&nbsp;discussive&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">articles</a> in defense of architecture and participating in <a href=";mode=news&amp;src=tyah&amp;lang=en" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">social media</a>. Congratulations and looking forward to seeing&nbsp;what becomes of the heavily branded institution in need of a new life.</p> Editor's Picks #347 Nam Henderson 2013-12-24T00:42:00-05:00 >2013-12-29T10:44:33-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="303" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Amelia Taylor-Hochberg Editorial Manager for Archinect features BI's inaugural publication, "FREE" in Screen/Print #3. Donna Sink LOVED "the cover of this periodical! So satirical".</p></em><br /><br /><p> For the latest edition of the <strong>In Focus</strong> series, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Archinect talked to London-based photographer Edward Neumann</a>. He describes himself "<em>an aspiring fine art photographer...I like the &lsquo;art for art&rsquo;s sake&rsquo; school of thought</em>".</p> <p> <img alt="" src="" title=""></p> <p> Plus, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Amelia Taylor-Hochberg</a>&nbsp;Editorial Manager for Archinect features&nbsp;<strong>BI</strong>'s inaugural publication, "<strong>FREE</strong>" in&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Screen/Print #3</a>.&nbsp;Donna Sink&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">LOVED</a>&nbsp;"<em>the cover of this periodical!&nbsp; So satirical</em>".</p> <p> <br><strong>News</strong><br> It's that time of the year again, so we are taking a look back at the year 2013 on Archinect by sharing the most trafficked and popular pages in Archinect's diverse online ecosystem, with <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">a list of 13 top 13 lists for '13</a>.</p> <p> <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Miles Jaffe</a>&nbsp;got excited "<em>Woo Hoo! My images headline #5 and #8!</em>"&nbsp;in <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Archinect's Top 13 Discussions for '13'</a>&nbsp;while in response to <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Archinect's Top 13 Lecture Posters for '13'</a>,&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Harold-Sprague Solie</a>&nbsp;argued "<em>You can really read into each schools methodology and educational philosophies through these posters. It is a shame to see so many of them favorin...</em></p> What is likely the world’s thinnest home Nam Henderson 2012-11-15T22:29:00-05:00 >2012-12-11T06:41:46-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="771" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>When Mr. Keret, 45, received a call from the architect, he was initially puzzled. &ldquo;This guy with a very heavy Polish accent said he wanted to make a house in proportion to my stories,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;It sounded like a prank.&rdquo;</p></em><br /><br /><p> Steven Karutz profiled Keret House, a recently completed example of "experimental architecture" by Jakub Szczesny, a Polish architect. &nbsp;Mr. Szczesny, 39, designed the space for an ideal resident, specifically Israeli writer, Etgar Keret. The architect who belongs to a collective called <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Centrala</a>, built the house in an incredibly thin gap between two existing buildings.</p>