Archinect - News 2015-11-27T07:10:59-05:00 Is Waze to blame for heavy traffic on L.A. residential side streets? Justine Testado 2015-11-24T15:00:00-05:00 >2015-11-24T18:01:53-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="353" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Waze sometimes sends drivers through little-used side streets such as Cody Road [in Sherman Oaks, Calif]...Some people try to beat Waze at its own game by sending misinformation about traffic jams and accidents so it will steer commuters elsewhere. Others log in and leave their devices in their cars, hoping Waze will interpret that as a traffic standstill and suggest alternate routes.</p></em><br /><br /><p>More about Waze on Archinect:</p><p><a title='Throwback Throughway: when GPS fails, these gorgeous "mental maps" help you navigate' href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Throwback Throughway: when GPS fails, these gorgeous "mental maps" help you navigate</a></p><p><a title="Waze takes on the ride-sharing market with new carpooling app" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Waze takes on the ride-sharing market with new carpooling app</a></p><p><a title="Arnold Schwarzenegger voices Waze app" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Arnold Schwarzenegger voices Waze app</a></p><p><a title="Waze and its new uneasy bedfellows" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Waze and its new uneasy bedfellows</a></p> Throwback Throughway: when GPS fails, these gorgeous "mental maps" help you navigate Julia Ingalls 2015-11-12T19:21:00-05:00 >2015-11-18T00:40:18-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="342" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>A set of maps from designer Archie Archambault might help us rebuild the mental maps of cities that we're starting to lose. Instead of a literal grid of streets, he maps out neighborhoods and the basic parts of a city the way someone who lives there might think of it, or at least the way they probably did before Google Maps existed.</p></em><br /><br /><p>How did people live&mdash;or at least find their way to all of the events, parties, and work-related meetings&mdash;before they had smartphones and <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">GPS</a>? You could ask a friend, just as Archie Archambault did when he first visited <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Portland</a> and didn't know his way around. Since then, he has started drawing circular "mental maps" of cities, based on the recollections of each urbanity's denizens.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Similar to the simplified subway line maps that help commuters get from one transit stop to another by omitting unnecessary details, these mental maps render cities in terms of big-picture human landmarks. He's mapped cities from Amsterdam to Kyoto to Vancouver, B.C. (and, just in case you find yourself up there without a good WiFi connection, the Moon).</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p> The new Monument Men: with 3D cameras and GPS data against cultural annihilation in Syria and beyond Alexander Walter 2015-11-12T19:00:00-05:00 >2015-11-18T00:40:05-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="289" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>That&rsquo;s why a team from the Institute for Digital Archaeology (IDA) is turning to the next best option&mdash;using technology to protect cultural heritage. Founded in 2012 by Roger Michel, IDA is a joint effort between Harvard University and Oxford University to create an open-source database of high-resolution images and three-dimensional graphics of things like paper and papyrus documents, epigraphs and small artifacts. Work on what IDA has named the Million Image Database began in early 2015.</p></em><br /><br /><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>The photo shows the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Baal Shamin temple</a> prior to its destruction. Volunteers of the&nbsp;Institute for Digital Archaeology were able to digitally archive the 2,000-year-old&nbsp;structure for the&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Million Image Database</a> project just in time before <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">ISIS fighters seized control</a> of Palmyra's historic site.</p><p>Related on Archinect:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">ISIS militants have reportedly blown up Palmyra's Arch of Triumph</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">ISIS blows up 2,000-year-old Baalshamin temple in Palmyra</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">ISIS continues destruction of ancient artefacts, burns Mosul library, smashes antique statues</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">PBS' premiere of "Time Scanners" brings 3D digital preservation technology to a wider audience</a></li></ul> Arnold Schwarzenegger voices Waze app Nicholas Korody 2015-06-16T16:15:00-04:00 >2015-06-17T09:12:25-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Starting Monday, drivers around the world could soon be directed by a familiar Austrian-accented voice telling them: "I'm a Terminator Cyberdyne Systems Model 101, and you're coming with me." It's Arnold Schwarzenegger, the actor and former California governor, who is lending his persona as the famed Terminator from the movie franchise to the community-based traffic and navigation app Waze.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> “3D Soundscape” Can Guide Blind People Through Cities Alexander Walter 2014-11-19T15:19:00-05:00 >2014-11-26T21:51:22-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="275" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Enter Cities Unlocked, a project intended to help people with sight loss navigate cities. The brainchild of a blind Microsoft employee, it uses GPS, a 3D audio headset, and Bluetooth beacons, among other technologies. [...] &ldquo;I&rsquo;m a blind person, I need to keep my ears open,&rdquo; she says. The headset uses bone-conducting technology, in which vibrations create a &ldquo;3D soundscape&rdquo; around the user.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Related:&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Parsons and the Met team up to increase accessibility for disabled</a></p> New podcast, new banknotes, new neurons: Weekly News Round-Up for October 6, 2014 Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2014-10-13T20:27:00-04:00 >2014-10-15T21:26:58-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="686" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p><strong><em>Sunday, October 12:</em></strong></p><ul><li><a title="A classic American look, feng shui notwithstanding" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">A classic American look, feng shui notwithstanding</a>: Investigating the impact of wealthy Chinese immigrants on suburban Seattle's real estate boom.</li></ul><p><strong><em>Saturday, October 11:</em></strong></p><ul><li><a title="Indiana Ponders Abolishing Licensing for Architects" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Indiana Ponders Abolishing Licensing for Architects</a>: Part of a state-wide reconsideration of more than "200 types of professional licenses, permits and certifications", aimed at cutting regulatory costs.</li><li><a title='Announcing "Archinect Sessions", our brand new podcast! Listen to Episode #1 now' href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Announcing "Archinect Sessions", our brand new podcast! Listen to Episode #1 now</a>: We're launching a weekly podcast to discuss prominent news items, feat. members of the Archinect community and other special guests. Ep. #1: "Where are the women?"</li></ul><p><strong><em>Thursday, October 9:</em></strong></p><ul><li><a title="Architects Create a 3-D Printed Column That Survives Earthquakes" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Architects Create a 3-D Printed Column That Survives Earthquakes</a>: Made of cement and based on ancient Incan techniques.</li><li><a title="Renzo Piano admits he's &quot;struggling to do something good&quot; for the LA Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences project" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Renzo Piano admits he's "struggling to do something good" for the LA Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences project</a>: A fable to remind us that architecture is never solely the product of architects.</li></ul><p><strong><em>Wednesday, October 8:...</em></strong></p> Nobel Prize in Medicine Is Awarded to Three Who Discovered Brain’s ‘Inner GPS’ Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2014-10-07T13:15:00-04:00 >2014-10-16T00:03:34-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="308" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The three scientists&rsquo; discoveries &ldquo;have solved a problem that has occupied philosophers and scientists for centuries &mdash; how does the brain create a map of the space surrounding us and how can we navigate our way through a complex environment?&rdquo; said the Karolinska Institute in Sweden, which chooses the laureates. The positioning system they discovered helps us know where we are, find our way from place to place and store the information for the next time</p></em><br /><br /><p>Back in 1971, John O'Keefe identified "place cells" in the brain &ndash; neurons that were selectively activated in relation to the subject's place in an environment. He concluded these nerves were composing a mental map of the space, and the collection of multiple place cells constituted a spatial memory of the environment.</p><p>Then in 2005, May-Britt Moser and Edvard I. Moser identified another group of nerve cells, the so-called "grid cells", that create a coordinate system in the brain. Together, place cells and grid cells create a precise understanding of space in the brain, allowing for navigation and spatial memory.</p> Google Maps enters the indoor GPS market Archinect 2012-11-13T12:18:00-05:00 >2012-11-13T12:18:24-05:00 <img src="" width="500" height="436" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>On Black Friday and throughout this holiday season, simply zoom in to a participating store on Google Maps to devise your shopping game plan. An indoor floor plan with helpful labels will automatically appear, and the familiar &ldquo;blue dot&rdquo; icon will help you figure out the fastest way to the accessories department, the food court when you need to refuel, and the closest restroom or ATM when you need a break from your marathon shopping session.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> Macy's introduces indoor GPS navigation Paul Petrunia 2012-11-08T11:28:00-05:00 >2012-11-13T12:20:20-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="321" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Macy&rsquo;s has added a new feature to its iPhone app that provides indoor turn-by-turn directions for its massive flagship location in New York City&rsquo;s Herald Square, courtesy of Meridian, the software startup behind an indoor GPS platform.</p></em><br /><br /><p> Is indoor GPS navigation the new wayfinding?</p> <p> <em>Since launching last year, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Meridian</a> has worked with a handful of prominent institutions to build indoor mapping systems from the ground up, including the American Museum of Natural History in New York and the Venetian hotel and casino in Las Vegas. The service uses a unique combination of GPS and WiFi data to pinpoint the precise location of the smartphone user indoors. By opening up its SDK to developers, Meridian should see plenty more locations incorporate this technology.</em></p>